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Equality, freedom, and religion [electronic resource] /
Roger Trigg.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press c2012.
description
ix, 184 p. 21 cm.
ISBN
0199576858, 9780199576852
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press c2012.
isbn
0199576858
9780199576852
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction -- Does religious freedom matter? -- Does equality trump freedom? -- Religious beliefs and institutions -- Equal beliefs? -- Is religious toleration enough? -- Freedom from the law? -- Belief and practice -- Necessary limits to religious freedom -- The challenge of equality -- The foundations of equality and freedom -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
11808409
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [173]-177) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Roger Trigg looks at the assumptions that lie behind the subordination of religious liberty to other social concerns, especially the pursuit of equality.. He gives examples from different Western countries of a steady erosion of freedom of religion. The protection of freedom of worship is often seen as sufficient, and religious practices are separated from the beliefs which inspire them. So far from religion in general, and Christianity in particular, providing a foundation for our beliefs in human dignity and human rights, religion is all too often seen as a threat and source of conflict, to be controlled at all costs. The challenge is whether any freedom can be preserved for long, if the basic human right to freedom of religious belief and practice is dismissed as of little account, with no attempt to provide any reasonable accommodation. Given the central role of religion in human life, unnecessary limitations on its expression are attacks on human freedom itself.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-07-01:
In this short but judicious volume, Trigg (Kellogg College, Oxford, UK) argues that religious freedom, including the freedom to reject religion, is a basic human right deserving special protection. The fact that religion frequently affirms a transcendent reality beyond the authority of the state gives freedom of belief a special priority. Though religion normally is expressed in and through institutions, Trigg regards religious freedom as pertaining primarily to the individual rather than the institution. Yet even religious institutions should enjoy freedoms not necessarily accorded to other civic organizations. Citing examples from contemporary US, Canadian, and UK societies, Trigg discusses ways in which religious freedom may be challenged by the claims of equality. Granting that some religious views, if put into practice, may be harmful and thus cannot be permitted, he nonetheless argues at the level of public policy for a general willingness to accommodate consciences even at the expense of strict equality. Thoughtful readers may not always arrive at the same conclusions as the author, but will certainly find helpful his fair and thoughtful analysis of issues that are critical to contemporary society. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers. S. C. Pearson emeritus, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
Reviews
Review Quotes
a carefully reasoned and clearly written book
a well-written and approachable discussion of some very difficult questions about freedom of religion and equality before the law ... The author analyses with exemplary clarity the implications of numerous awkward cases and judicial opinions from many quarters.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2012
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Summaries
Long Description
Is religious freedom being curtailed in pursuit of equality, and the outlawing of discrimination? Is enough effort made to accommodate those motivated by a religious conscience? All rights matter but at times the right to put religious beliefs into practice increasingly takes second place in the law of different countries to the pursuit of other social priorities. The right to freedom of belief and to manifest belief is written into all human rights charters. In the United Statesreligious freedom is sometimes seen as 'the first freedom'. Yet increasingly in many jurisdictions in Europe and North America, religious freedom can all too easily be 'trumped' by other rights. Roger Trigg looks at the assumptions that lie behind the subordination of religious liberty to other social concerns, especially the pursuit of equality. He gives examples from different Western countries of a steady erosion of freedom of religion. The protection of freedom of worship is often seen as sufficient, and religious practices are separated from the beliefs which inspire them. So far from religion in general, and Christianity in particular, providing a foundation for our beliefs inhuman dignity and human rights, religion is all too often seen as threat and a source of conflict, to be controlled at all costs. The challenge is whether any freedom can preserved for long, if the basic human right to freedom of religious belief and practice is dismissed as of little account, with noattempt to provide any reasonable accommodation. Given the central role of religion in human life, unnecessary limitations on its expression are attacks on human freedom itself.
Main Description
Is religious freedom being curtailed in pursuit of equality, and the outlawing of discrimination? Is enough effort made to accommodate those motivated by a religious conscience? All rights matter but at times the right to put religious beliefs into practice increasingly takes second place in the law of different countries to the pursuit of other social priorities. The right to freedom of belief and to manifest belief is written into all human rights charters. In the United States religious freedom is sometimes seen as 'the first freedom'. Yet increasingly in many jurisdictions in Europe and North America, religious freedom can all too easily be 'trumped' by other rights. Book jacket.
Main Description
Is religious freedom being curtailed in pursuit of equality, and the outlawing of discrimination? Is enough effort made to accommodate those motivated by a religious conscience? All rights matter but at times the right to put religious beliefs into practice increasingly takes second place in the law of different countries to the pursuit of other social priorities. The right to freedom of belief and to manifest belief is written into all human rights charters. In the United States religious freedom is sometimes seen as 'the first freedom'. Yet increasingly in many jurisdictions in Europe and North America, religious freedom can all too easily be 'trumped' by other rights. Roger Trigg looks at the assumptions that lie behind the subordination of religious liberty to other social concerns, especially the pursuit of equality. He gives examples from different Western countries of a steady erosion of freedom of religion. The protection of freedom of worship is often seen as sufficient, and religious practices are separated from the beliefs which inspire them. So far from religion in general, and Christianity in particular, providing a foundation for our beliefs in human dignity and human rights, religion is all too often seen as threat and a source of conflict, to be controlled at all costs. The challenge is whether any freedom can preserved for long, if the basic human right to freedom of religious belief and practice is dismissed as of little account, with no attempt to provide any reasonable accommodation. Given the central role of religion in human life, unnecessary limitations on its expression are attacks on human freedom itself.
Main Description
Is religious freedom being curtailed in pursuit of equality, and the outlawing of discrimination? Is enough effort made to accommodate those motivated by a religious conscience? All rights matter but at times the right to put religious beliefs into practice increasingly takes second place inthe law of different countries to the pursuit of other social priorities. The right to freedom of belief and to manifest belief is written into all human rights charters. In the United States religious freedom is sometimes seen as 'the first freedom'. Yet increasingly in many jurisdictions in Europeand North America, religious freedom can all too easily be 'trumped' by other rights. Roger Trigg looks at the assumptions that lie behind the subordination of religious liberty to other social concerns, especially the pursuit of equality. He gives examples from different Western countries of a steady erosion of freedom of religion. The protection of freedom of worship is often seenas sufficient, and religious practices are separated from the beliefs which inspire them. So far from religion in general, and Christianity in particular, providing a foundation for our beliefs in human dignity and human rights, religion is all too often seen as threat and a source of conflict, tobe controlled at all costs. The challenge is whether any freedom can preserved for long, if the basic human right to freedom of religious belief and practice is dismissed as of little account, with no attempt to provide any reasonable accommodation. Given the central role of religion in human life,unnecessary limitations on its expression are attacks on human freedom itself.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. 1
Does Religious Freedom Matter?p. 11
Does Equality Trump Freedom?p. 27
Religious Beliefs and Institutionsp. 41
Equal Beliefs?p. 55
Is Religious Toleration Enough?p. 69
Freedom from the Law?p. 85
Belief and Practicep. 97
Necessary Limits to Religious Freedomp. 111
The Challenge of Equalityp. 127
The Foundations of Equality and Freedomp. 139
Conclusionp. 153
Notesp. 159
Bibliographyp. 173
Indexp. 179
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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