Catalogue


Girls and women in classical Greek religion [electronic resource] /
Matthew Dillon.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, c2002.
description
x, 436 p. : ill.
ISBN
0415202728
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, c2002.
isbn
0415202728
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11748447
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Matthew Dillon is Senior Lecturer at the University of New England, Armidale, Australia
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-08-01:
In this careful and detailed study, Dillon (Univ. of New England, Australia) surveys the literary and archaeological evidence of the role that girls and women played in the religious cults of classical Greece. He examines female participation in a wide range of cults, including public, gender-specific, and domestic, along with the responsibilities within those cults, such as those of priestesses, prophetesses (belly-talkers), and prostitutes. He carefully uses the limited number of literary and inscriptional references, combining them with rich physical evidence to reconstruct a vivid portrait of the significant role women and young girls played in Greek religious life. The discussion is often technical and detailed, suggesting that the target audiences are specialists and graduate students. Nevertheless, much of his discussion is fully illustrated with 56 black-and-white photographs, supplemented with a glossary of technical terms. Consequently, the work contains a wealth of information for the specialist yet remains accessible for advanced undergraduate students. To this reviewer's knowledge, no comparable study exists. Highly recommended--no collection of classical, religious, or gender studies would be complete without it. J. R. Asher Georgetown College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2002
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
It has often been thought that participation in fertility rituals was women's most important religious activity in classical Greece. Matthew Dillon's wide-ranging study makes it clear that women engaged in numerous other rites and cults, and that their role in Greek religion was actually more important than that of men. Women invoked the gods' help in becoming pregnant, venerated the god of wine, worshipped new and exotic deities, used magic for both erotic and pain-relieving purposes, and far more besides. Clear and comprehensive, this volume challenges many stereotypes of Greek women and offers unexpected insights into their experience of religion. With more than fifty illustrations, and translated extracts from contemporary texts, this is an essential resource for the study of women and religion in classical Greece.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Scholars have seen the most important religious activity in classical Greece by women as their participation in fertility rituals. Dillon shows how women engaged in numerous other rites & that their role was often more important than that of the men.
Main Description
It has often been thought that participation in fertility rituals was women's most important religious activity in classical Greece. Matthew Dillon's wide-ranging study makes it clear that women engaged in numerous other rites and cults, and that their role in Greek religion was actually more important than that of men. Women invoked the gods' help in becoming pregnant, venerated the god of wine, worshipped new and exotic deities, used magic for both erotic and pain-relieving purposes, and far more besides. While traditional scholarship has seen such involvement in religion as escapist, Dillon's skillful presentation of the evidence proves that this denigrates women's religiosity and the real importance they attached to their relationship with the divine. Clear, coherent and comprehensive, this volume challenges many stereotypes of Greek women and offers unexpected insights into their experience of religion. With more than fifty illustrations, and translated extracts from contemporary texts, this isan essential resource for the study of women and religion in classical Greece.
Back Cover Copy
Modern scholars have seen women's most important religious activity in classical Greece as their participation in fertility rituals. Matthew Dillon's wide-ranging new study makes it clear that women engaged in numerous rites and cults besides such festivals, and that their role in Greek religion was actually more important than that of men.Women invoked the gods for help in becoming pregnant, venerated the god of wine, worshipped exotic gods new to the Greek pantheon, used magic and potions for both erotic and pain-relieving purposes - and far more besides. While traditional scholarship has seen such involvement in religion as 'escapist', Dillon's skilful presentation of the evidence proves that this denigrates women's religiosity, and the real importance which they attached to their mediation with the divine.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. vii
Prefacep. x
Introductionp. 1
Public religious roles for girls and womenp. 7
Women as dedicatorsp. 9
The public religious roles of girls and adolescent women in Athensp. 37
Women priestsp. 73
Segregated and ecstatic religious ritesp. 107
Women-only festivalsp. 109
Women at the margins of Greek religionp. 139
Prostitutes, foreign women and the godsp. 183
Sacrificial and domestic ritualsp. 209
From adolescent girl to woman, wife and motherp. 211
Women, sacrifice and impurityp. 236
Women and the corpse: mourning ritualsp. 268
Epiloguep. 293
Notesp. 301
Glossaryp. 369
Abbreviationsp. 372
Bibliographyp. 380
Indexp. 403
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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