Catalogue

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The Zelmenyaners [electronic resource] : a family saga /
Moyshe Kulbak ; translated by Hillel Halkin ; introduction and notes by Sasha Senderovich.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2013.
description
xxxiv, 267 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
9780300112320 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
uniform title
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2013.
isbn
9780300112320 (pbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11672587
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A masterpiece...[Kulbak's] characters are funny and pathetic, his prose delicate and inventive."Ezra Glinter, The Forward
"Kulbak's work is a masterpiece. . . . His characters are funny and pathetic, his prose delicate and inventive. His novel ushers the reader not into Soviet Belorussia, but into a world entirely its own." Forward
"The funniest Yiddish novel about Soviet central planning you'll read this year."Jewish Book Council
" The Zelmenyaners is always more sweet than sour. Kulbak brings a poignancy to his observations of a family, and a place, for which he clearly feels much affection." The Jewish Book Council
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'The Zelmenyaners' describes the travails of a Jewish family in Minsk that is torn asunder by the new Soviet reality. Four generations are depicted in riveting and often uproarious detail as they face the profound changes brought on by the demands of the Soviet regime and its collectivist, radical secularism.
Main Description
This is the first complete English-language translation of a classic of Yiddish literature, one of the great comic novels of the twentieth century. The Zelmenyaners describes the travails of a Jewish family in Minsk that is torn asunder by the new Soviet reality. Four generations are depicted in riveting and often uproarious detail as they face the profound changes brought on by the demands of the Soviet regime and its collectivist, radical secularism. The resultant intergenerational showdownsincluding disputes over the introduction of electricity, radio, or electric trolleyare rendered with humor, pathos, and a finely controlled satiric pen. Moyshe Kulbak, a contemporary of the Soviet Jewish writer Isaac Babel, picks up where Sholem Aleichem left off a generation before, exploring in this book the transformation of Jewish life.

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