Catalogue


Words and their stories [electronic resource] : essays on the language of the Chinese revolution /
edited by Ban Wang.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2011.
description
ix, 342 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9789004188600 (hard cover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2011.
isbn
9789004188600 (hard cover : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Understanding the Chinese revolution through words: an introduction / Ban Wang -- Revolution: from literary revolution to revolutionary literature / Jianhua Chen -- The Long March / Enhua Zhang -- RectiĆ¾cation: party discipline, intellectual remolding, and the formation of a political community / Kirk A. Denton -- Worker-peasant-soldier's literature / Xiaomei Chen -- Steel is made through persistent tempering / Xinmin Liu -- Socialist realism / Ban Wang -- Political lyric / Xin Ning -- Writing the actual / Charles A. Laughlin -- Nowhere in the world does there exist love or hatred without reason / Haiyan Lee -- Promote physical culture and sport, improve the people's constitution / Xiaoning Lu -- Typical people in typical circumstances / Richard King -- Use the past to serve the present; the foreign to serve China / Tina Mai Chen -- Women can hold up half the sky / Xueping Zhong -- Let a hundred flowers blossom, let a hundred schools of thought contend / Richard Kraus -- They love battle array, not silks and satins / Tina Mai Chen -- The three prominences / Yizhong Gu -- Revolutionary narrative in the Seventeen Years Period / Guo Bingru.
catalogue key
11672470
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ban Wang, Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, UCLA, is the William Haas Professor in Chinese Studies at Stanford University. He has written on Chinese literature, film, and aesthetics and is the author of The Sublime Figure of History (1997) and Illuminations from the Past (2004).
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
As China joins the capitalist world economy, the problems of social disintegration that gave rise to the earlier revolutionary social movements are becoming pressing. Instead of viewing the Chinese Revolution as an academic study, these essays suggest that the motifs of the Revolution are still alive & relevant.
Main Description
As China joins the capitalist world economy, the problems of social disintegration that gave rise to the earlier revolutionary social movements are becoming pressing. Instead of viewing the Chinese Revolution as an academic study, these essays suggest that the motifs of the Revolution are still alive and relevant. The slogan "Farewell to Revolution" that obscures the revolutionary language is premature. In spite of dislocations and ruptures in the revolutionary language, to rethink this discourse is to revisit a history in terms of sedimented layers of linguistic meanings and political aspirations. Earlier meanings of revolutionary words may persist or coexist with non-revolutionary rivals. Recovery of the vital uses of key revolutionary words proffers critical alternatives in which contemporary capitalist myths can be contested.
Table of Contents
List of Contributorsp. vii
Understanding the Chinese Revolution through Words: An Introductionp. 1
Revolution: From Literary Revolution to Revolutionary Literaturep. 15
The Long Marchp. 33
Rectification: Party Discipline, Intellectual Remolding, and the Formation of a Political Communityp. 51
Worker-Peasant-Soldier Literaturep. 65
Steel Is Made through Persistent Temperingp. 85
Socialist Realismp. 101
Political Lyricp. 119
Writing the Actualp. 135
Nowhere in the World Does There Exist Love or Hatred without Reasonp. 149
Promote Physical Culture and Sport, Improve the People's Constitutionp. 171
Typical People in Typical Circumstancesp. 185
Use the Past to Serve the Present; the Foreign to Serve Chinap. 205
Women Can Hold Up Half the Skyp. 227
Let a Hundred Flowers Blossom, Let a Hundred Schools of Thought Contendp. 249
They Love Battle Array, Not Silks and Satinsp. 263
The Three Prominencesp. 283
Revolutionary Narrative in the Seventeen Years Periodp. 305
Bibliographyp. 319
Indexp. 335
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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