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A study of the life and works of Athanasius Kircher, "Germanus incredibilis" [electronic resource] : with a selection of his unpublished correspondence and an annotated translation of his autobiography /
by John Edward Fletcher ; edited for publication by Elizabeth Fletcher ; editorial adjustment for the Aries book series by Garry Trompf.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2011.
description
p. cm.
ISBN
9789004207127 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
This is the long awaited masterwork on the great polymathic German Jesuit of the seventeenth century, Athanasius Kircher. Scholars have continually acclaimed the work in its thesis form, but now it has at last become widely accessible through publication by Brill. It considers the life, work and correspondence of Kircher, and adds a translation of his autobiography with extensive commentary. The bulk of the work critically evaluates Kircher's extraordinary contributions in many fields - cosmology, geology, linguistics, medicine, mechanics, music, history, art - and covers his relationships with great continental scholars (Peiresc, Huygens, Boyle, etc.) and with patrons of scientific endeavour (especially Christina of Sweden), together with his part in the Jesuits' "Republic of Letters" across the globe, and his influences on subsequent 'greats' (Leibniz, Goethe, etc.). An immense work of patient, careful and astute scholarship. - Prof. Gary Trompf, University of Sydney.
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is the long awaited masterwork on the great polymathic German Jesuit of the 17th century, Athanasius Kircher.
Description for Reader
All those interested in the history of science and the pursuit of esoteric knowledge, the intellectual history of the Baroque period,and the Jesuits.
Long Description
Athanasius Kircher, a German Jesuit in 17th-century Rome, was an enigma. Intensely pious and a prolific author, he was also a polymath fascinated with everything from Egyptian hieroglyphs to the tiny creatures in his microscope.His correspondence with popes, princes and priests was a window into the restless energy of the period. It showed first-hand the seventeenth-century's struggle for knowledge in astronomy, microscopy, geology, chemistry, musicology, Egyptology, horology… The list goes on.Kircher's books reflect the mind-set of 17th-century scholars - endless curiosity and a substantial larding of naiveté: Kircher scorned alchemy as the wishful thinking of charlatans, yet believed in dragons.His life and correspondence provide a key to the transition from the Middle Ages to a new scientific age. This book, though unpublished, has been long quoted and referred to. Awaited by scholars and specialists of Kircher, it is finally available with this edition.
Main Description
Athanasius Kircher, a German Jesuit in 17th-century Rome, was an enigma. Intensely pious and a prolific author, he was also a polymath fascinated with everything from Egyptian hieroglyphs to the tiny creatures in his microscope. His correspondence with popes, princes and priests was a window into the restless energy of the period. It showed first-hand the seventeenth-century s struggle for knowledge in astronomy, microscopy, geology, chemistry, musicology, Egyptology, horology The list goes on. Kircher s books reflect the mind-set of 17th-century scholars - endless curiosity and a substantial larding of naiveté: Kircher scorned alchemy as the wishful thinking of charlatans, yet believed in dragons.His life and correspondence provide a key to the transition from the Middle Ages to a new scientific age. This book, though unpublished, has been long quoted and referred to. Awaited by scholars and specialists of Kircher, it is finally available with this edition.

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