Catalogue


Religious identity in an early Reformation community [electronic resource] : Augsburg, 1517 to 1555 /
by Michele Zelinsky Hanson.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2009.
description
xi, 237 p., [1] folded leaf of plate : map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004166734 (hardback : alk. paper), 9789004166738 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2009.
isbn
9004166734 (hardback : alk. paper)
9789004166738 (hardback : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Ambiguous identities -- Religious tensions in the 1520s -- Anabaptists: a special case? -- Magisterial reform and religious deviance -- Making the bi-confessional city: political -- Making the bi-confessional city: religious -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
11670392
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [227]-231) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Zelinsky [gelingt] eine umfassende Darstellung und Deutung der Entwicklung religiöser Identitäten und deren Auswirkungen auf soziale Beziehungen...Zelinskys Studie überzeugt schliesslich auch durch eine anspruchsvolle und dennoch erfreulich unaufgeregte sprachliche Gestaltung." Natalie Krentz, in Zeitschrift für Historische Forschung, vol. 38 (2011) no. 3, pp. 520-522.
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Summaries
Description for Reader
All those interested in the history of the Reformation, the history of early modern Germany, religious history, the history of Anabaptism, legal historians, as well as those interested in the history of religious conflict, toleration and identity formation.
Main Description
Debate over the usefulness of the confessionalization paradigm for understanding how Europeans responded to religious differences resulting from the Reformation has obscured peoples experiences during the early years of reform. Based on interrogations recorded in Augsburg, Germany, in the first half of the sixteenth century, the compelling portraits of individual believers presented in this book provide a rare insight into the lives of ordinary people during one of the most controversial periods in religious history. Speaking about their faith and encounters with others in their own words, they rephrase the debate in terms of contemporary experiences. The resulting study challenges previous assumptions about the importance of belief in constructing religious identities and reveals the potential for accommodation amidst conflict.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Based on interrogations recorded in the first half of the 16th century, the portraits of individual believers presented in this book provide a rare insight into the lives of ordinary people during the early years of one of the most controversial periods of Europe's religious history.
Table of Contents
Map of Augsburg
Introductionp. 1
Ambiguous Identitiesp. 27
Religious Tensions in the 1520sp. 45
Trespassingp. 50
Blasphemyp. 59
Anabaptists: A Special Case?p. 79
Degrees of Associationp. 84
Social Networksp. 95
Trouble with the Lawp. 101
Magisterial Reform and Religious Deviancep. 107
Making the Bi-Confessional City: Political Encountersp. 139
Censorship of Printingp. 146
Critical Speechesp. 151
Making the Bi-Confessional City: Religious Encountersp. 173
Attacks on the Clergyp. 174
Religious Deviancep. 200
Miscellaneousp. 207
Conclusionp. 217
Bibliographyp. 227
Indexp. 233
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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