Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

New Kingdom ostraca from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge [electronic resource] /
by Fredrik Hagen.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2011.
description
x, 124 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.
ISBN
9004182950 (hbk. : acid-free paper), 9789004182950 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2011.
isbn
9004182950 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
9789004182950 (hbk. : acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11669022
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text publishes a previously unknown collection of hieratic ostraca from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. The texts include a broad range of genres, including wisdom literature, religious hymns, magical texts, medical recipes, private letters, and much more.
Description for Reader
All those interested in the literature, religion and socio-economic history of New Kingdom Egypt.
Long Description
This book publishes a previously unknown collection of hieratic ostraca from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. The texts include a broad range of genres, including wisdom literature, religious hymns, magical texts, medical recipes, private letters, administrative notes, scribal exercises ( Kemit), and copies of tomb inscriptions. Each ostracon is presented with photographs, facsimile drawings and hieroglyphic transcriptions, as well as translations and brief philological commentaries. Many of the texts can be linked to the village of Deir el-Medina on internal evidence, and the book offers new data to scholars working with material from this famous site.
Main Description
This book publishes a previously unknown collection of hieratic ostraca from the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge. The texts include a broad range of genres, including wisdom literature, religious hymns, magical texts, medical recipes, private letters, administrative notes, scribal exercises (Kemit), and copies of tomb inscriptions. Each ostracon is presented with photographs, facsimile drawings and hieroglyphic transcriptions, as well as translations and brief philological commentaries. Many of the texts can be linked to the village of Deir el-Medina on internal evidence, and the book offers new data to scholars working with material from this famous site.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem