Catalogue

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Latin historiography and poetry in the early empire [electronic resource] : generic interactions /
edited by John F. Miller and A.J. Woodman.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2010.
description
ix, 248 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004177558 (alk. paper), 9789004177550 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2010.
isbn
9004177558 (alk. paper)
9789004177550 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction / John F. Miller & A.J. Woodman -- Crowds and leaders in imperial historiography and in epic / Philip Hardie -- Causation in post-Augustan epic / Bruce Gibson -- Too close? historian and poet in the Apocolocyntosis / Cynthia Damon -- Cannibalising history: Livian moments in Statius' Thebaid / Helen Lovatt -- Replacing history: inaugurating the new year in Statius, Siluae 4.1 / Jean-Michel Hulls -- The eruption of Vesuvius in the epistles of Statius and Pliny / Carole Newlands -- From Sallust to Silius Italicus: metus hostilis and the fall of Rome in the Punica / John Jacobs -- Rhoxolani blues (Tacitus, Histories 1.79): Virgil's Scythian ethnography revisited / Rhiannon Ash -- Ac rursus noua laborum facies: Tacitus' repetition of Virgil's Wars (Histories 3.26-34) / Timothy A. Joseph -- Amicus Caesaris: Vibius Crispus in the works of Juvenal and Tacitus / Kathryn Williams -- The unfortunate marriage of Gaius Silius: Tacitus and Juvenal on the fall of Messalina / Christopher Nappa -- The figure of Seneca in Tacitus and the Octavia / Matthew Taylor.
general note
Papers presented at the "Proxima poetis: Latin historiography and poetry in the early empire" conference, held at the University of Virginia on April 11-12, 2008.
Sequel to: Clio and the poets (Brill, 2002).
catalogue key
11668055
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [223]-239) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
John F. Miller, Ph.D. (North Carolina), is Professor of Classics at the University of Virginia and author of Ovid's Elegiac Festivals: Studies in the Fasti (1991), Apollo, Augustus, and the Poets (2009), and many articles on Roman poetry and the reception of Ovid. He was edited-in-chief of classical Journal from 1991 to 1998 and has edited two collaborative volumes on Greek and Latin literature. A.J. Woodman, Ph.D. (Cambridge), is Gildersleeve Professor of Classics at the University of Virginia and author of Rhetoric in Classical Historiography (1998), Latin Historians (1997, with C.S. Kraus) and Tacitus Reviewed (1988) and commentaries on Velleius Paterculus (1977, 1983) and (with R.H. Martin) Tacitus, Annals 3 (1996) and 4 (1989). He has produced award-winning translations of Sallust and Tacitus' Annals and has co-edited numerous volumes on Latin poetry and historical writing.
Reviews
Review Quotes
" ...Quintilian's proxima poetis is in fact an apposite characterization of Roman historiography. The editors and the publisher are to be congratulated for this important and thought-provoking collection." Jakub Pigo in BMCR, 14.8.2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
This book, a sequel to Clio and the Poets (Brill 2002), takes as its point of departure Quintilian's statement that 'historiography is very close to the poets': it examines not only how verse interfaces with historical texts but also how first-century AD Roman historians engage with issues and patterns of thought central to contemporary poetry and with specific poetic texts. Included are substantive discussions of a wide range of authors, including Velleius Paterculus, Lucan, Seneca, Statius, Pliny, Valerius Flaccus, Juvenal, Silius Italicus, and Tacitus.
Description for Reader
Students and scholars of Latin literature generally, and of the Roman historians and poets specifically; university libraries
Long Description
This book, a sequel to Clio and the Poets (Brill 2002), takes as its point of departure Quintilian's statement that 'historiography is very close to the poets': it examines not only how verse interfaces with historical texts but also how first-century AD Roman historians engage with issues and patterns of thought central to contemporary poetry and with specific poetic texts. Included are substantive discussions of a wide range of authors, notably Lucan, Seneca, Statius, Pliny, Juvenal, Silius Italicus, and Tacitus.
Main Description
This book, a sequel toClio and the Poets(Brill 2002), examines the inter-relationships between Latin poetry and historiography in the first century AD.
Main Description
This book, a sequel to Clio and the Poets (Brill 2002), takes as its point of departure Quintilian's statement that 'historiography is very close to the poets': it examines not only how verse interfaces with historical texts but also how early imperial Roman historians engage with specific poetic texts. Included are substantive discussions of a wide range of authors, notably Lucan, Seneca, Statius, Pliny, Juvenal, Silius Italicus, and Tacitus. Book jacket.
Main Description
This book, a sequel to Clio and the Poets (Brill 2002), takes as its point of departure Quintilians statement that historiography is very close to the poets: it examines not only how verse interfaces with historical texts but also how first-century AD Roman historians engage with issues and patterns of thought central to contemporary poetry and with specific poetic texts. Included are substantive discussions of a wide range of authors, notably Lucan, Seneca, Statius, Pliny, Juvenal, Silius Italicus, and Tacitus.
Table of Contents
Contributorsp. VII
Prefacep. XI
Introductionp. 1
Crowds and Leaders in Imperial Historiography and in Epicp. 9
Causation in Post-Augustan Epicp. 29
Too Close? Historian and Poet in the Apocolocyntosisp. 49
Cannibalising History: Livian Moments in Statius' Thebaidp. 71
Replacing History: Inaugurating the New Year in Statius, Silvae 4.1p. 87
The Eruption of Vesuvius in the Epistles of Statius and Plinyp. 105
From Sallust to Silius Italicus: Metus Hostilis and the Fall of Rome in the Punicap. 123
Rhoxolani Blues (Tacitus, Histories 1.79): Virgil's Scythian Ethnography Revisitedp. 141
Ac rursus nova laborum fades: Tacitus' Repetition of Virgil's Wars at Histories 3.26-34p. 155
Amicus Caesaris: Vibius Crispus in the Works of Juvenal and Tacitusp. 171
The Unfortunate Marriage of Gaius Silius: Tacitus and Juvenal on the Fall of Messalinap. 189
The Figure of Seneca in Tacitus and the Octaviap. 205
Bibliographyp. 223
Index Locorump. 241
General Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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