Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Different worlds of discourse [electronic resource] : transformations of gender and genre in late Qing and early republican China /
edited by Nanxiu Qian, Grace S. Fong, and Richard J. Smith.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2008.
description
xi, 415 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004167765 (hardback : alk. paper), 9789004167766 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2008.
isbn
9004167765 (hardback : alk. paper)
9789004167766 (hardback : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
"This volume stems from an international conference, titled "Beyond Tradition and Modernity: Gender, Genre, and the Negotiation of Knowledge in Late Qing China," held on 4-6 March 2005"--P. [ix].
catalogue key
11665037
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [383]-402) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work explores the reform period from three interrelated perspectives, the construction of gender roles, the development of literary genres, and the emergence of new forms of print media.
Description for Reader
All those interested in Chinese history, culture, literature, and women and gender studies, especially of the late imperial and early republican periods.
Long Description
During the late Qing reform era (1895-1912), women for the first time in Chinese history emerged in public space in collective groups. They assumed new social and educational roles and engaged in intense debates about the place of women in China's present and future. These debates found expression in new media, including periodicals and pictorials, which not only harnessed the power of existing cultural forms but also encouraged experimentation with a variety of new literary genres and styles - works increasingly produced by and for Chinese women. Different Worlds of Discourse explores the reform period from three interrelated and comparatively neglected perspectives: the construction of gender roles, the development of literary genres, and the emergence of new forms of print media.
Main Description
"Different Worlds of Discourse" explores the late Qing reform era (c. 1895-1912) from three interrelated and comparatively neglected perspectives: the construction of gender roles, the development of literary genres, and the emergence of new forms of print media.
Main Description
During the late Qing reform era (1895-1912), women for the first time in Chinese history emerged in public space in collective groups. They assumed new social and educational roles and engaged in intense debates about the place of women in Chinas present and future. These debates found expression in new media, including periodicals and pictorials, which not only harnessed the power of existing cultural forms but also encouraged experimentation with a variety of new literary genres and styles - works increasingly produced by and for Chinese women. Different Worlds of Discourse explores the reform period from three interrelated and comparatively neglected perspectives: the construction of gender roles, the development of literary genres, and the emergence of new forms of print media.
Table of Contents
List of Figures
Different Worlds of Discourse: Transformations of Gender and Genre in Late Qjng and Early Republican Chinap. 1
Transformations of Gender Roles
Wang Zhaoyuan (1763-1851) and the Erasure of "Talented Women" by Liang Qichaop. 29
"Tossing the Brush"? Wu Zhiying (1868-1934) and the Uses of Calligraphyp. 57
Reconfiguring Time, Space, and Subjectivity: Lu Bicheng's Travel Writings on Mount Lup. 87
From "Cainu" to "Nu Jiaoxi": Female Normal Schools and the Transformation of Women's Education in the Late Qing Period, 1895-1911p. 115
Transformations of Genres
Mediated Imaginings: Biographies of Western Women and Their Japanese Sources in Late Qing Chinap. 147
Female Assassins, Civilization, and Technology in Late Qing Literature and Culturep. 167
Patriotism Versus Love: The Central Dilemma of Zhan Kai's Novel Bihai zhup. 197
The Production of Gender and Genres in New Print Media
Women in Shenbaoguan Publications, 1872-90p. 227
The Mother Nu xuebao versus the Daughter Nu xuebao: Generational Differences between 1898 and 1902 Women Reformersp. 257
Tianyi bao and He Zhen's Views on "Women's Revolution"p. 293
Male Gaze/Female Students: Late Qing Education for Women as Portrayed in Beijing Pictorials, 1902-08p. 315
The Construction of Gender and Genre in the 1910s New Media: Evidence from The Ladies' Journalp. 349
Suggested Bibliographyp. 383
About the Contributorsp. 403
Indexp. 407
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem