Catalogue


The soul of development : biblical Christianity and economic transformation in Guatemala /
Amy L. Sherman.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
description
xviii, 214 p.
ISBN
0195106717 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
isbn
0195106717 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
1160094
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-02:
This work is based on the author's surveys and interviews. Survey respondents are labeled "orthodox," "moderate," and "weak" evangelicals, "cristo-pagans," and "orthodox" and "traditional" Catholics. Sherman, formerly a visiting fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, Washington, DC, shows that converts to orthodox Christianity from traditional belief systems are more likely to have values that would permit them to succeed in a capitalist, individually oriented market economy, but that "cristo-pagans," or traditional Guatamalan peasants with their particular religious and traditional worldview, are particularly maladapted to economic development. She finds that orthodox Catholics and evangelicals score high on a scale that measures how open one's worldview is to capitalist values, but that cristo-pagans and moderate evangelicals score worst of all. Her fear, she concludes, is not that Guatemala will experience considerable economic progress under the influence of an increasingly large number of orthodox Christians but that more affluent generations will become more secularized and materialistic. There is some depth to this study not found in comparable literature. References to current revisionist development literature as well as classic studies of cultural change; data from personal stories and interviews Sherman conducted. Appendix includes a copy of the questionnaire used. Upper-division undergraduate; graduate; researchers. B. T. Froehle; Georgetown University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An excellent contribution to our understanding of the relationship between religion and development."--Peter Berger, Boston University
"An excellent contribution to our understanding of the relationshipbetween religion and development."--Peter Berger, Boston University
"An excellent contribution to our understanding of the relationship between religion and development."--Peter Berger, Boston University "The writing is crisp and very clear as to its basic approach and evaluational standpoint. The organization of the argument is likewise clear....A genuine extension of our knowledge on a matter of contemporary debate."--David Martin, London School of Economics and Political Science and author of Tongues of Fire .
"An excellent contribution to our understanding of the relationship between religion and development."--Peter Berger,Boston University "The writing is crisp and very clear as to its basic approach and evaluational standpoint. The organization of the argument is likewise clear....A genuine extension of our knowledge on a matter of contemporary debate."--David Martin,London School of Economics and Political Scienceand author ofTongues of Fire.
A very interesting and thought-provoking contribution to the discussion on religion and economic development
"...Sherman offers a well-argued case that spiritual convictions can influence economic outcomes at the individual level, through their impact on attitude and lifestyle choices."--The Marketplace
"...Sherman offers a well-argued case that spiritual convictions caninfluence economic outcomes at the individual level, through their impact onattitude and lifestyle choices."--The Marketplace
There is much to like about this book ... The writing is crisp and polemical
"The writing is crisp and very clear as to its basic approach and evaluational standpoint. The organization of the argument is likewise clear....A genuine extension of our knowledge on a matter of contemporary debate."--David Martin, London School of Economics and Political Science and authorof Tongues of Fire.
"The writing is crisp and very clear as to its basic approach andevaluational standpoint. The organization of the argument is likewise clear....Agenuine extension of our knowledge on a matter of contemporary debate."--DavidMartin, London School of Economics and Political Science and author of Tonguesof Fire.
"An excellent contribution to our understanding of the relationship between religion and development."--Peter Berger, Boston University"The writing is crisp and very clear as to its basic approach and evaluational standpoint. The organization of the argument is likewise clear....A genuine extension of our knowledge on a matter of contemporary debate."--David Martin, London School of Economics and Political Science and author of Tongues of Fire."...Sherman offers a well-argued case that spiritual convictions can influence economic outcomes at the individual level, through their impact on attitude and lifestyle choices."--The Marketplace
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Sharman argues that Latin America's Protestant revival is likely to help the prospects for the region's economic growth and democratic development, explaining how conversion to a Biblical worldview has improved the welfare of Guatemala's poor.
Long Description
Ever since Max Weber started an argument about the role of Protestantism in jump-starting northern Europe's economic development, scholars have clashed over the influence of religion and culture on a society's (or an individual's) economic prospects. Today, many wonder whether the "explosion" of Protestantism in Latin America will effect a similar wave of growth and democratization. In this book, Sherman compiles the results of her field study and national survey of 1000 rural Guatemalan households. She offers persuasive evidence that, in Guatemala and throughout the region, religious world-views significantly influence economic life. Sherman explains how the change in attitude and behaviour that accompanies conversion from animism to a Biblically orthodox world-view has improved the domestic welfare and economic status of many families. Further, she asserts that this new attitude, sympathetic to democratic-capitalism, has created a "moral cultural soil" in which freedom, personal empowerment, an enhanced status for women, and a desire to get ahead can be nurtured.
Main Description
Ever since Max Weber started an argument about the role of Protestantism in jump-starting northern Europe's economic development, scholars have clashed over the influence of religion and culture on a society's (or an individual's) economic prospects. Today, many wonder whether the "explosion"of Protestantism in Latin America will effect a similar wave of growth and democratization. In this book, Sherman compiles the results of her field study and national survey of 1000 rural Guatemalan households. She offers persuasive evidence that, in Guatemala and throughout the region, religiousworld-views significantly influence economic life. Sherman explains how the change in attitude and behavior that accompanies conversion from animism to a Biblically orthodox world-view has improved the domestic welfare and economic status of many families. Further, she asserts that this newattitude, sympathetic to democratic-capitalism, has created a "moral cultural soil" in which freedom, personal empowerment, an enhanced status for women, and a desire to get ahead can be nurtured.
Main Description
Ever since Max Weber started an argument about the role of Protestantism in jump-starting northern Europe's economic development, scholars have clashed over the influence of religion and culture on a society's (or an individual's) economic prospects. Today, many wonder whether the "explosion" of Protestantism in Latin America will effect a similar wave of growth and democratization. In this book, Sherman compiles the results of her field study and national survey of 1000 rural Guatemalan households. She offers persuasive evidence that, in Guatemala and throughout the region, religious world-views significantly influence economic life. Sherman explains how the change in attitude and behavior that accompanies conversion from animism to a Biblically orthodox world-view has improved the domestic welfare and economic status of many families. Further, she asserts that this new attitude, sympathetic to democratic-capitalism, has created a "moral cultural soil" in which freedom, personal empowerment, an enhanced status for women, and a desire to get ahead can be nurtured.
Table of Contents
Preface of Fires and Tremorsp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Glossaryp. xvii
Introductionp. 3
Setting the Contextp. 19
Locating the Argumentp. 21
Latin American Protestantism and Economic Developmentp. 38
Cristo-Paganism Described and Analyzedp. 51
Orthodoxy and Economic Transformationp. 71
Worldview and Socioeconomic Development the Evidence Explainedp. 73
Outback Journeys: The Evidence Experiencedp. 97
Orthodoxy and Democratic Capitalismp. 127
Evangelicals and Civic Culturep. 129
the Evangelicals' Alternative Communitarianismp. 147
Conclusion a Third Reformation?p. 160
Worldview and Development Survey Questionnairep. 171
Selected Additional Tables from the Worldview and Development Surveyp. 183
Notesp. 187
Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 211
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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