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Materials and expertise in early modern Europe [electronic resource] : between market and laboratory /
edited by Ursula Klein and E.C. Spary.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2010.
description
vi, 398 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226439682 (alk. paper), 9780226439686 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2010.
isbn
0226439682 (alk. paper)
9780226439686 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Papers of two workshops which were held at the Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin, in July 2004 and December 2006.
catalogue key
11576230
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-11-01:
Academics are increasingly examining the mundane matters first popularized in such works as Henry Petroski's The Pencil (1989) and Mark Kurlansky's Cod (CH, Dec'97, 35-2109). In this volume of conference papers, notable historians of technology and science analyze materials, including vermilion, ink, milk, liqueurs, gunpowder, and dyes. As they place these substances in cultural context, mainly covering the 15th to 18th centuries, the authors additionally view the materials as illustrations of the permeable boundaries between artisanal practice and the experimental philosophy of scholars. The chapters describe manufacturing processes but also explore the knowledge claims made about each material's composition and its powers. The editors organized the book into three parts, emphasizing production, commerce, and state support. In all realms, experts emerged from hybrid backgrounds, combining craftsmanship with the academy. Footnotes appear at the bottom of every page, primary source bibliographies are provided in each chapter, and an overall list of secondary sources is given at the end of the book. Scholars in numerous historical disciplines will find something useful in this well-edited volume. Summing Up: Recommended. Academic and professional libraries, all levels. A. K. Ackerberg-Hastings University of Maryland University College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A very valuable addition to the history of matter. A fascinating and thought-provoking range of studies of mundane substances as lures to consumption, commerce, warfare and science."
"A very valuable addition to the history of matter. A fascinating and thought-provoking range of studies of mundane substances as lures to consumption, commerce, warfare and science."Andrew Pickering, University of Exeter
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
It is often assumed that natural philosophy was the forerunner of early modern natural sciences. But where did these sciences' systematic observation and experimentation get their starts? In this work, the laboratories, workshops, and marketplaces emerge as arenas where hands-on experience united with higher learning.
Main Description
It is often assumed that natural philosophy was the forerunner of early modern natural sciences. But where did these sciences' systematic observation and experimentation get their starts? In Materials and Expertise in Early Modern Europe , the laboratories, workshops, and marketplaces emerge as arenas where hands-on experience united with higher learning. In an age when chemistry, mineralogy, geology, and botany intersected with mining, metallurgy, pharmacy, and gardening, materials were objects that crossed disciplines. Here, the contributors tell the stories of metals, clay, gunpowder, pigments, and foods, and thereby demonstrate the innovative practices of technical experts, the development of the consumer market, and the formation of the observational and experimental sciences in the early modern period. Materials and Expertise in Early Modern Europe showcases a broad variety of forms of knowledge, from ineffable bodily skills and technical competence to articulated know-how and connoisseurship, from methods of measuring, data gathering, and classification to analytical and theoretical knowledge. By exploring the hybrid expertise involved in the making, consumption, and promotion of various materials, and the fluid boundaries they traversed, the book offers an original perspective on important issues in the history of science, medicine, and technology.
Main Description
It is often assumed that natural philosophy was the forerunner of early modern natural sciences. But where did these sciences' systematic observation and experimentation get their starts? InMaterials and Expertise in Early Modern Europe, the laboratories, workshops, and marketplaces emerge as arenas where hands-on experience united with higher learning. In an age when chemistry, mineralogy, geology, and botany intersected with mining, metallurgy, pharmacy, and gardening, materials were objects that crossed disciplines. Here, the contributors tell the stories of metals, clay, gunpowder, pigments, and foods, and thereby demonstrate the innovative practices of technical experts, the development of the consumer market, and the formation of the observational and experimental sciences in the early modern period.Materials and Expertise in Early Modern Europeshowcases a broad variety of forms of knowledge, from ineffable bodily skills and technical competence to articulated know-how and connoisseurship, from methods of measuring, data gathering, and classification to analytical and theoretical knowledge. By exploring the hybrid expertise involved in the making, consumption, and promotion of various materials, and the fluid boundaries they traversed, the book offers an original perspective on important issues in the history of science, medicine, and technology.
Main Description
Papers of two workshops which were held at the Max-Planck-Institut f'ur Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin, in July 2004 and December 2006.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction: Why Materials?p. 1
The Production of Materials
Introduction to Part 1p. 25
Vermilion, Mercury, Blood, and Lizards: Matter and Meaning in Metalworkingp. 29
Ceramic Naturep. 50
The Production of Silver, Copper, and Lead in the Harz Mountains from Late Medieval Times to the Onset of Industrializationp. 71
Inkp. 101
Blending Technical Innovation and Learned Natural Knowledge: The Making of Ethersp. 125
Materials in the Market Sphere
Introduction to Part 2p. 159
Enlightened Milk: Reshaping a Bodily Substance into a Chemical Objectp. 163
The Sparkling Nectar of Spas; or, Mineral Water as a Medically Commodifiable Material in the Province, 1770-1805p. 198
Liqueurs and the Luxury Marketplace in Eighteenth-Century Parisp. 225
State Interventions
Introduction to Part 3p. 257
Economizing Agricultural Resources in the German Economic Enlightenmentp. 261
The Crisis of English Gunpowder in the Eighteenth Centuryp. 288
Between Craft Routines and Academic Rules: Natural Dyestuffs and the "Art" of Dyeing in the Eighteenth Centuryp. 321
Secondary Sourcesp. 355
Contributorsp. 389
Indexp. 393
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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