Catalogue


Mary Robinson and the genesis of Romanticism [electronic resource] : literary dialogues and debts, 1784-1821 /
Ashley Cross.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2017.
description
xiii, 288 pages ; 24 cm
ISBN
1848933681 (hbk. : alk. paper), 9781848933682 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2017.
isbn
1848933681 (hbk. : alk. paper)
9781848933682 (hbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction: Robinson's romantic dialogues -- Prelude: 'sweet converse': Della Cruscan dialogues -- Harping on lyrical exchange: Samuel Coleridge -- Illegitimate influences: Charlotte Smith -- The morning post aesthetic: Robert Southey -- Walsingham, Caleb Williams and queer panic: William Godwin -- Vindicating the writing woman: Mary Wollstonecraft -- From lyrical ballads to lyrical tales: Willam Wordsworth -- Resurrecting Robinson: Charlotte Dacre -- 'Sick of the same bruise': John Keats.
catalogue key
11576200
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 247-272) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Originally coming to prominence as an actress and scandalous celebrity, Mary Robinson created an identity for herself as a poet and novelist of the Romantic school. Through a series of literary dialogues with established writers - including Robert Southey, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith and Mary Wollstonecraft - Robinson put herself at the centre of Romantic literary culture as observer, participant and creator. Cross argues that Robinson's dialogues shaped the nature of Romantic verse and went on to influence second-generation Romantics such as Christina Rossetti and Alfred Lord Tennyson.
Main Description
Originally coming to prominence as an actress and scandalous celebrity, Mary Robinson created an identity for herself as a poet and novelist of the Romantic school. Through a series of literary dialogues with established writers including Robert Southey, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith and Mary Wollstonecraft Robinson put herself at the centre of Romantic literary culture as observer, participant and creator. Cross argues that Robinson's dialogues shaped the nature of Romantic verse and went on to influence second-generation Romantics such as Christina Rossetti and Alfred Lord Tennyson.
Description for Bookstore
Originally coming to prominence as an actress and scandalous celebrity, Mary Robinson created an identity for herself as a poet and novelist of the Romantic school. Through a series of literary dialogues with established writers including Hannah Cowley, Robert Southey, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, John Keats, Charlotte Smith, William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft Robinson put herself at the centre of Romantic literary culture as observer, participant and creator. Cross argues that Robinson's dialogues shaped the nature of Romantic verse and went on to influence second-generation Romantics such as Christina Rossetti and Alfred Lord Tennyson.
Description for Reader
Romanticism, Theatre History and Women's Writing
Main Description
Originally coming to prominence as an actress and scandalous celebrity, Mary Robinson created an identity for herself as a poet and novelist of the Romantic school. Through a series of literary dialogues with established writers - including Hannah Cowley, Robert Southey, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, John Keats, Charlotte Smith, William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft - Robinson put herself at the centre of Romantic literary culture as observer, participant and creator. Cross argues that Robinson's dialogues shaped the nature of Romantic verse and went on to influence second-generation Romantics such as Christina Rossetti and Alfred Lord Tennyson.
Description for Reader
Romanticism, Eighteenth-Century Literature and Theatre, and Gender Studies
Table of Contents
Introduction: Robinson's Dialogues: From Della Cruscan to Romantic
Romantic Robinson: Poetic Dialogues
Harping on Lyrical Exchange: Coleridge and Robinson
Illegitimate Influences: Charlotte Smith, Coleridge and Robinson's Sappho and Phaon
Romantic Authorship and the Morning Post Aesthetic: Robert Southey
From Lyrical Ballads to Lyrical Tales: Wordsworth, Reputation and Romantic Genius
Radical Robinson: Dialogic Fictions
Dangerous Dialogues and Queer Panic: Walsingham and Caleb Williams
Vindicating the Writing Woman: Robinson's Response to Wollstonecraft
Posthumous Robinson: Early Nineteenth-Century Responses
Resurrecting Robinson: Charlotte Dacre's Hours of Solitude
'Sick of the same bruise': John Keats, Robinson and the Forlorn Body of Sensibility
Coda: Robinson and the Victorians
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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