Catalogue


Manliness & civilization [electronic resource] : a cultural history of gender and race in the United States, 1880-1917 /
Gail Bederman.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1995.
description
xiii, 307 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226041387 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1995.
isbn
0226041387 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11576113
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-296) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1995-03-01:
Bederman (history, Notre Dame) has written a complex but intriguing account of the links between concepts of race, gender, and civilization in late 19th- and early 20th-century America. Focusing on shifting constructions of "manhood" and "civilization," she examines aspects of the lives and careers of Jack Johnson, Ida B. Wells, G. Stanley Hall, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Theodore Roosevelt, and Edgar Rice Burroughs, all of whom illustrate attempts to use these constructions as rhetorical weapons in the struggle to define basic race and gender roles. A densely packed analysis that will be appropriate primarily for scholars in the field of American cultural studies.-Anthony O. Edmonds, Ball State Univ., Muncie, Ind. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, March 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
When former heavyweight champion Jim Jeffries came out of retirement on the fourth of July, 1910 to fight current black heavywight champion Jack Johnson in Reno, Nevada, he boasted that he was doing it "for the sole purpose of proving that a white man is better than a negro." Jeffries, though, was trounced. Whites everywhere rioted. The furor, Gail Bederman demonstrates, was part of two fundamental and volatile national obsessions: manhood and racial dominance. In turn-of-the-century America, cultural ideals of manhood changed profoundly, as Victorian notions of self-restrained, moral manliness were challenged by ideals of an aggressive, overtly sexualized masculinity. Bederman traces this shift in values and shows how it brought together two seemingly contradictory ideals: the unfettered virility of racially "primitive" men and the refined superiority of "civilized" white men. Focusing on the lives and works of four very different AmericansTheodore Roosevelt, educator G. Stanley Hall, Ida B. Wells, and Charlotte Perkins Gilmanshe illuminates the ideological, cultural, and social interests these ideals came to serve.
Main Description
When former heavyweight champion Jim Jeffries came out of retirement on the fourth of July, 1910 to fight current black heavywight champion Jack Johnson in Reno, Nevada, he boasted that he was doing it "for the sole purpose of proving that a white man is better than a negro." Jeffries, though, was trounced. Whites everywhere rioted. The furor, Gail Bederman demonstrates, was part of two fundamental and volatile national obsessions: manhood and racial dominance. In turn-of-the-century America, cultural ideals of manhood changed profoundly, as Victorian notions of self-restrained, moral manliness were challenged by ideals of an aggressive, overtly sexualized masculinity. Bederman traces this shift in values and shows how it brought together two seemingly contradictory ideals: the unfettered virility of racially "primitive" men and the refined superiority of "civilized" white men. Focusing on the lives and works of four very different Americans--Theodore Roosevelt, educator G. Stanley Hall, Ida B. Wells, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman--she illuminates the ideological, cultural, and social interests these ideals came to serve.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Remaking Manhood through Race and "Civilization"
"The White Man's Civilization on Trial"
Representations of Lynching, and Northern Middle-Class Manhood
"Teaching Our Sons to Do What We Have Been Teaching the Savages to Avoid"
Racial Recapitulation, and the Neurasthenic Paradox
"Not to Sex - But to Race!"
Civilized Anglo-Saxon Womanhood, and the Return of the Primitive Rapist
Theodore Roosevelt: Manhood, Nation, and "Civilization" Conclusion: Tarzan and After
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem