Catalogue


Great power peace and American primacy [electronic resource] : the origins and future of a new international order /
Joshua Baron.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.
description
xv, 261 pages ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9781137299475 (hbk)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.
isbn
9781137299475 (hbk)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction: Seasons of Darkness and Light1. The Transformation of Great Power Politics2. A Theory of Order: Explaining Change in International Politics3. A Season of Light: The Balance of Power and the Westphalian Order4. A Fifty Years' Crisis: The Collapse of the Westphalian Order and the Path to Total War5. Dawn of a New Day: The Rise of the American Order6. Getting MAD and Even: Nuclear Weapons, Bipolarity, and a New Kind of Rivalry7. Balance of Power and Its Critics: The Limitations of Current Paradigms8. Preserving Peace in the 21st Century: Thought and Action in a Newly-Ordered WorldConclusion: The Need for Vigilance and Sacrifice.
abstract
"From the turn of the 15th century until the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, the great powers frequently fought wars or regularly stood on the precipice of conflict. In contrast, for more than fifty years we have lived through an unprecedented period of great power peace. This book advances a theory of change based on the Realist tradition and uses it to explain the transformation of great power politics from centuries of warfare and multipolarity to a time of peace and American primacy.Challenging conventional wisdom about the causes of American primacy, Baron explores the contributions to peace made by democracy, nuclear weapons and globalization as well as the continued relevance of the balance of power. Providing new insights into major debates within the policy community, this book examines America's forward military presence, Western policy towards China and Russia, the evolution of the European Union and Japan's role in Asia.Baron raises important questions surrounding American primacy and the durability of the current international order, informing policy-making in the coming years as the United States attempts to manage the rise of China and secure its own leadership role and also considering how to maintain the current state of peace. "--
catalogue key
11573955
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Joshua Baron has a profound understanding of how power works and how to make it work better. In Great Power Peace and American Primacy, he advances prophetic, provocative, and worldly arguments about the future of political order, stability, and peace. This is top-notch work on a grand scale by a formidable and ingenious thinker." - Joseph M. Parent, University of Miami, USA
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Summaries
Long Description
From the turn of the 15th century until the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, the great powers frequently fought wars or regularly stood on the precipice of conflict. In contrast, for more than fifty years we have lived through an unprecedented period of great power peace. This book advances a theory of change based on the Realist tradition and uses it to explain the transformation of great power politics from centuries of warfare and multipolarity to a time of peace and American primacy. Challenging conventional wisdom about the causes of American primacy, Baron explores the contributions to peace made by democracy, nuclear weapons and globalization as well as the continued relevance of the balance of power. Providing new insights into major debates within the policy community, this book examines America's forward military presence, Western policy towards China and Russia, the evolution of the European Union and Japan's role in Asia. Baron raises important questions surrounding American primacy and the durability of the current international order, informing policy-making in the coming years as the United States attempts to manage the rise of China and secure its own leadership role and also considering how to maintain the current state of peace.
Main Description
From the turn of the 15th century until the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, the great powers frequently fought wars or regularly stood on the precipice of conflict. In contrast, for more than fifty years we have lived through an unprecedented period of great power peace. This book advances a theory of change based on the Realist tradition and uses it to explain the transformation of great power politics from centuries of warfare and multipolarity to a time of peace and American primacy.Challenging conventional wisdom about the causes of American primacy, Baron explores the contributions to peace made by democracy, nuclear weapons and globalization as well as the continued relevance of the balance of power. Providing new insights into major debates within the policy community, this book examines America's forward military presence, Western policy towards China and Russia, the evolution of the European Union and Japan's role in Asia.Baron raises important questions surrounding American primacy and the durability of the current international order, informing policy-making in the coming years as the United States attempts to manage the rise of China and secure its own leadership role and also considering how to maintain the current state of peace.

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