Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The fallacy of campaign finance reform [electronic resource] /
John Samples.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2006.
description
xiii, 375 p. : ill.
ISBN
0226734501 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780226734507 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2006.
isbn
0226734501 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780226734507 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The Madisonian vision of politics -- The progressive vision of politics -- The corruption of representation -- Political culture -- Equality -- Electoral competition -- The origins of modern campaign finance law -- McCain-Feingold and the market for incumbent protection -- A liberalizing agenda.
catalogue key
11573121
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [293]-362) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-01-01:
Proposals and debates over the financing of political campaigns generally divide into two camps. One side argues that money spent for political purposes is not protected speech under the First Amendment and it may be regulated. Conversely, others argue that money is speech and therefore it may not be regulated. Samples (director, Center for Representative Government, Cato Institute) champions the latter camp. Assuming a self-avowed libertarian credo, the author develops a well-argued, articulate case to show that efforts to regulate money in politics are rooted in a Progressive Era vision of reform, contrary to what he calls a Madisonian vision of the Constitution, which protects liberty. While Samples considers that campaign finance reform--a term he refuses to use and attacks with derision--threatens constitutional liberty, two other broad arguments are directed against it. First, the track record of reform has proven that it is a failure. Second, these reforms are ideologically biased, favoring the interests of its advocates. Samples advocates deregulating campaign financing, opposing even mandatory disclosure of contributions and expenditures. Good choice for campaign finance and campaigns and elections collections. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers, upper-division undergraduates through practitioners. D. Schultz Hamline University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"As the federal government's size and intrusiveness grow, so does its attempt to regulateration, reallypolitical speech about the government's composition and behavior. John Samples sees the menace of this through the prism of political philosophy. This book is a lucid and urgently needed warning about a growing assault on the First Amendment and the entire Madisonian understanding of American politics."
"As the federal government''s size and intrusiveness grow, so does its attempt to regulateration, reallypolitical speech about the government''s composition and behavior. John Samples sees the menace of this through the prism of political philosophy. This book is a lucid and urgently needed warning about a growing assault on the First Amendment and the entire Madisonian understanding of American politics."George F. Will
"A thoughtful antidote to the exalted status accorded campaign finance reform."
"A thoughtful antidote to the exalted status accorded campaign finance reform."James E. Campbell, Political Science Quarterly
"A wonderful volume that debunks pretty much everything that one hears from modern 'good government goo-goos.' From his astute analysis of the seemingly eternal Progressive Movement to his citing of study after study that demonstrate that legal campaign contributions do not 'corrupt' the political process."
"A wonderful volume that debunks pretty much everything that one hears from modern ''good government goo-goos.'' From his astute analysis of the seemingly eternal Progressive Movement to his citing of study after study that demonstrate that legal campaign contributions do not ''corrupt'' the political process."William Anderson, Public Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Defying long-held assumptions and conventional political wisdom, 'The Fallacy of Campaign Finance Reform' is a provocative and decidedly nonpartisan work that is ideal for anyone concerned about the future of American government.
Main Description
At first glance, campaign finance reform looks like a good idea. McCain-Feingold, for instance, regulates campaigns by prohibiting national political parties from accepting soft money contributions from corporations, labor unions, and wealthy individuals. But are such measures, or any of the numerous and similarly restrictive proposals that have circulated through Washington in recent years, really good for our democracy? John Samples says no, and here he takes a penetrating look into the premises and consequences of the long crusade against big money in politics. How many Americans, he asks, know that there is little to no evidence that campaign contributions really influence members of Congress? Or that so-called negative political advertising actually improves the democratic process by increasing voter turnout and knowledge? Or that limits on campaign contributions make it harder to run for office, thereby protecting incumbent representatives from losing their seats of power? Posing tough questions such as these, Samples uncovers numerous fallacies beneath proposals for campaign finance reform. He argues that our most common concerns about money in politics are misplaced because the ideals implicit in our notion of corruption are incoherent or indefensible. The chance to regulate money in politics allows representatives to serve their own interests at a cost to their constituents. And, ironically, this long crusade against the corruption caused by campaign contributions allows public officials to reduce their vulnerability by suppressing electoral competition. Defying long-held ssumptions and conventional political wisdom, The Fallacy of Campaign Finance Reform is a provocative and decidedly nonpartisan work that will be essential for anyone concerned about the future of American government.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Introduction: Money and Speechp. 1
The Conflict of Idealsp. 15
The Madisonian Vision of Politicsp. 17
The Progressive Vision of Politicsp. 42
Four Illusionsp. 81
The Corruption of Representationp. 83
Political Culturep. 107
Equalityp. 130
Electoral Competitionp. 165
Realitiesp. 187
The Origins of Modern Campaign Finance Lawp. 189
McCain-Feingold and the Market for Incumbent Protectionp. 233
A Liberalizing Agendap. 255
Notesp. 293
Indexp. 363
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem