Catalogue


Europeanization and civil society [electronic resource] : Turkish NGOS as instruments of change? /
Markus Ketola.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave, 2013.
description
xi, 187 pages ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9781137034519
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave, 2013.
isbn
9781137034519
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11572893
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 171-182) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Markus Ketola is a Fellow at the Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK. His research subjects include civil society, NGOs, social policy and development, with a particular focus on both Turkey and the European Union.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Europeanization and Civil Society' offers a theoretically informed, empirically rich, and critical assessment of EU relations with NGOs in Turkey. Markus Ketola shows convincingly how poorly EU civil society conceptions and funding priorities match with conditions on the ground and how local NGOs negotiate external opportunities and domestic demands. Frank Schimmelfennig, Center for Comparative and International Studies, ETH Z├╝rich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), Switzerland
'Europeanization and Civil Society' offers a theoretically informed, empirically rich, and critical assessment of EU relations with NGOs in Turkey. Markus Ketola shows convincingly how poorly EU civil society conceptions and funding priorities match with conditions on the ground and how local NGOs negotiate external opportunities and domestic demands. Frank Schimmelfennig, Center for Comparative and International Studies, ETH Zrich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), Switzerland
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Do NGOs strengthen Turkey's efforts at Europeanization and democratization or do they use EU funding to serve other interests? This book offers a critical investigation of the relationship between Turkish NGOs and the European Union (EU) and a nuanced assessment of the opportunities and limitations to fashioning social change by funding NGOs.
Long Description
Since 1999 when Turkey was declared a candidate country for European Union membership, Turkish nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have found themselves at the heart of the EU pre-accession process. Not only is the development of a vibrant and strong civil society key part of the Europeanization process Turkey is expected to undertake, but NGOs also have an important role in facilitating broader socio-political changes through a range of EU-funded projects. These claims, however, are based on normative assumptions on how Turkish NGOs should behave, rather than on empirical evidence of how they experience and respond to the Europeanization project. This book examines the (dis)connections between EU civil society policy and Turkish NGOs in detail. Through interviews with key actors from the NGO sector, and policymakers from the EU and Turkish government the book draws a picture of a complex and intricate relationship. Turkish NGOs do not passively accept the top-down agenda set by the EU civil society funding framework but often find creative ways to circumvent and resist the EU's objectives.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Boxesp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
List of Acronymsp. x
Introductionp. 1
Europeanization from a Civil Society Perspectivep. 10
EU Civil Society Policyp. 33
Civil Society in Turkeyp. 58
NGO Relationshipsp. 82
Civil Society Support in Turkeyp. 107
Tracing the Impact of EU Policy on the Groundp. 133
Conclusionp. 157
Notesp. 166
Bibliographyp. 171
Indexp. 183
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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