Catalogue


Writing early modern London [electronic resource] : memory, text and community /
Andrew Gordon, University of Aberdeen, UK.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
description
viii, 264 pages ; 23 cm
ISBN
9781137294913
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
isbn
9781137294913
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction: Writing early modern London -- Henry Machyn's Book of remembrance -- Contesting inheritance: William Smith and Isabella Whitney -- John Stow and the textuality of custom -- Credit history to civic history: Thomas Middleton and the politics of urban memory.
catalogue key
11567542
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 240-255) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrew Gordon is a lecturer in Renaissance Literature at the University of Aberdeen, UK. He is the author of numerous articles and chapters on early modern London, manuscript culture and correspondence. He has edited (with Bernhard Klein) Literature, Mapping and the Politics of Space in Early Modern Britain (2001), and (with Thomas Rist) The Arts of Remembrance in Early Modern England (2013).
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Writing Early Modern London' explores how urban community in early modern London was experienced, imagined and translated into textual form. Ranging from previously unstudied manuscripts to major works by Middleton, Stow and Whitney, it examines how memory became a key cultural battleground as rites of community were appropriated in creative ways.
Long Description
What does it mean to write the city? How could the myriad experiences of life in early modern London be translated into textual form? In a detailed study of works ranging from little known manuscript accounts to major canonical texts from the pen of Thomas Middleton and Isabella Whitney, Writing Early Modern London pursues these questions. Arguing that the impulse to record and reflect upon the early modern city was fuelled by the process of religious reformation, it traces the profound impact of these upheavals upon how community was experienced and imagined. The authors studied here show how rites of community were appropriated and re-imagined in texts which responded creatively to the transformation of urban life. Contesting London's future involved contesting the past, and Writing Early Modern London demonstrates how memory became a key cultural battleground, one in which writing itself was implicated, as a far-reaching 'reformation of the archive' challenged the habits of memory within early modern culture.
Long Description
What does it mean to write the city? How could the myriad experiences of life in early modern London be translated into textual form? In a detailed study of works ranging from little known manuscript accounts to major canonical texts from the pen of Thomas Middleton and Isabella Whitney, Writing the City pursues these questions. Arguing that the impulse to record and reflect upon the early modern city was fuelled by the process of religious reformation, it traces the profound impact of these upheavals upon how community was experienced and imagined. The authors studied here show how rites of community were appropriated and re-imagined in texts which responded creatively to the transformation of urban life. Contesting London's future involved contesting the past, and Writing the City demonstrates how memory became a key cultural battleground, one in which writing itself was implicated, as a far-reaching 'reformation of the archive' challenged the habits of memory within early modern culture.
Main Description
What does it mean to write the city? How could the myriad experiences of life in early modern London be translated into textual form? In a detailed study of works ranging from little known manuscript accounts to major canonical texts from the pen of Thomas Middleton and Isabella Whitney, Writing Early Modern London pursues these questions. Arguing that the impulse to record and reflect upon the early modern city was fuelled by the process of religious reformation, it traces the profound impact of these upheavals upon how community was experienced and imagined. The authors studied here show how rites of community were appropriated and re-imagined in texts which responded creatively to the transformation of urban life. Contesting Londons future involved contesting the past, and Writing Early Modern London demonstrates how memory became a key cultural battleground, one in which writing itself was implicated, as a far-reaching reformation of the archive challenged the habits of memory within early modern culture.
Main Description
What does it mean to write the city? How could the myriad experiences of life in early modern London be translated into textual form? In a detailed study of works ranging from little known manuscript accounts to major canonical texts from the pen of Thomas Middleton and Isabella Whitney, Writing the City pursues these questions. Arguing that the impulse to record and reflect upon the early modern city was fuelled by the process of religious reformation, it traces the profound impact of theseupheavals upon how community was experienced and imagined. The authors studied here show how rites of community were appropriated and re-imagined in texts which responded creatively to the transformation of urban life. Contesting London's future involved contesting the past, and Writing the City demonstrates how memory became a key cultural battleground, one in which writing itself was implicated, as a far-reaching 'reformation of the archive' challenged the habits of memory within early modernculture.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Introduction: Writing Early Modern Londonp. 1
Henry Machyn's Book of Remembrancep. 11
Contesting Inheritance: William Smith and Isabella Whitneyp. 60
John Stow and the Textuality of Customp. 110
Credit History to Civic History: Thomas Middleton and the Politics of Urban Memoryp. 155
Conclusionp. 200
Notesp. 205
Select Bibliographyp. 240
Indexp. 256
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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