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Rhetorical traditions and British romantic literature /
edited by Don H. Bialostosky and Lawrence D. Needham.
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1995.
description
vii, 312 p.
ISBN
0253311802 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c1995.
isbn
0253311802 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1153976
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 281-299) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, March 1996
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Romantic "genius" did not sweep away classical rhetoric. As these essays demonstrate, romantic writers drew upon a number of rhetorical models, including the sophistic, classical, biblical, and enlightenment traditions. These essaysÑmany of them created for this volumeÑdocument the importance of these traditions in shaping the poetry, novels, and criticism of Coleridge, De Quincey, Wordsworth, Shelley, Blake, Austen, and Scott. The contributors are Stephen C. Behrendt, Don H. Bialostosky, Jerome Christensen, Richard W. Clancey, Klaus Dockhorn, James Engell, David Ginsberg, Bruce E. Graver, Scott Harshbarger, Theresa M. Kelley, J. Douglas Kneale, John R. Nabholtz, Lawrence D. Needham, Marie Secor, Nancy S. Struever, Leslie Tannenbaum, and Susan J. Wolfson.
Main Description
"The book deserves a large and passionate readership among both Romanticists and others; I hope it will inspire further work along similar lines." -- Modern Philology "... a collection of essays that is admirable for its quite conservative and utterly convincing account of the structuring presence of the classical rhetorical tradition in the works of several Romantic writers..." -- The Wordsworth Circle Romantic "genius" did not sweep away classical rhetoric. As these essays demonstrate, romantic writers drew upon a number of rhetorical traditions -- including the sophistic, classical, biblical, and enlightenment in the creation of their art.
Main Description
"The book deserves a large and passionate readership among both Romanticists and others; I hope it will inspire further work along similar lines." -- Modern Philology"... a collection of essays that is admirable for its quite conservative and utterly convincing account of the structuring presence of the classical rhetorical tradition in the works of several Romantic writers..." -- The Wordsworth CircleRomantic "genius" did not sweep away classical rhetoric. As these essays demonstrate, romantic writers drew upon a number of rhetorical traditions -- including the sophistic, classical, biblical, and enlightenment in the creation of their art.
Main Description
"The book deserves a large and passionate readership among both Romanticists and others; I hope it will inspire further work along similar lines." Modern Philology "... a collection of essays that is admirable for its quite conservative and utterly convincing account of the structuring presence of the classical rhetorical tradition in the works of several Romantic writers..." The Wordsworth Circle Romantic "genius" did not sweep away classical rhetoric. As these essays demonstrate, romantic writers drew upon a number of rhetorical traditionsincluding the sophistic, classical, biblical, and enlightenment in the creation of their art.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
The Method of The Friendp. 11
"Comparing Power" Coleridge and Similep. 28
De Quincey's Rhetoric of Display and Confessions of an English Opium-Eaterp. 48
Romantic Prose and Classical Rhetoricp. 65
Wordsworth's Cintra Tract: Politics, the Classics, and the Duty of the Poetp. 79
The Oratorical Pedlarp. 94
Wordsworth's Poems, in Two Volumes (1807) and the Epideictic Traditionp. 108
The Case for William Wordsworth: Romantic Invention versus Romantic Geniusp. 122
The Invention/Disposition of The Prelude, Book Ip. 139
Romantic Aversions: Apostrophe Reconsideredp. 149
Shelley and the Ciceronian Oratorp. 167
Prophetic Form: The "Still Better Order" of Blake's Rhetoricp. 185
Robert Lowth's Sacred Hebrew Poetry and the Oral Dimension of Romantic Rhetoricp. 199
The New Rhetoric and Romantic Poeticsp. 217
The Conversable World: Eighteenth-Century Transformations of the Relation of Rhetoric and Truthp. 233
Jeanie Deans and the Nature of True Eloquencep. 250
Appendix: Wordsworth and the Rhetorical Tradition in England (1944)p. 265
Select Bibliographyp. 281
Contributorsp. 300
Indexp. 302
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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