Catalogue


Fostering independence, participation, and healthy aging through technology [electronic resource] : workshop summary /
Tracy A. Lustig and Steve Olson, Rapporteurs ; Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence ; Board on Health Sciences Policy ; Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education ; Institute of Medicine and National Research Council of the National Academies.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, [c2013]
description
xii, 72 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0309285178 (pbk.), 9780309285179 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, [c2013]
isbn
0309285178 (pbk.)
9780309285179 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Summary of a workshop held by the Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence on December 19, 2012 in Washington, D.C. titled Fostering Independence, Participation, and Healthy Aging Through Technology--Cf. p. 3.
catalogue key
11509798
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 57-58).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the National Research Council (NRC) have had prominent roles in discussions of aging, disability, and technology for decades. In 1978, Aging and Medical Education (IOM, 1978) raised national awareness of the challenges to physicians posed by the aging of the U.S. population. Thirty years later, Retooling for an Aging America highlighted concerns for the entire health care workforce in view of the aging of the population, including the role of technology in caring for older populations. The 1988 report The Aging Population in the 21st Century examined social, economic, and demographic changes among older adults, as well as many health-related topics: health promotion and disease prevention; quality of life; health care system financing and use; and the quality of care- especially long-term care. In 1991, the landmark report Disability in America laid out a national agenda to prevent disability and improve the lives of people with disabling conditions. The 1997 report Enabling America: Assessing the Role of Rehabilitation Science and Engineering examined the knowledge base of rehabilitation science and engineering and proposed ways to translate scientific findings into interventions that produce better health. And the 2007 report The Future of Disability in America examined progress made since the earlier reports and looked at continuing barriers that limit the independence, productivity, and participation in community life of people with disabilities. All these reports were produced by committees appointed in accordance with guidelines of the National Academies and met multiples times to compile and review evidence, reach consensus on conclusions and recommendations, draft a report of the committee, and then modify that draft report in response to comments from outside reviewers. The IOM and NRC have also held several workshops related to aging, disability, and technology and published summary reports, such as Technology for Adaptive Aging and Grand Challenges of Our Aging Society. The IOM and NRC also convene groups that take a different approach to issues of pressing national and international importance. Often known as forums or roundtables, these groups meet regularly to foster dialogue and confront issues of mutual interest and concern among a broad range of stakeholders. They can convene workshops, initiate cooperative projects among members, commission independently authored articles, and generate ideas for independent consensus studies. In 2012 the IOM and NRC joined together to establish the Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence to provide a neutral venue for broad-ranging discussions among the many stakeholders involved with aging and disability. The goals of the forum are to highlight areas in which the coordination of the aging and disability networks is strong, examine the challenges involved in aligning the aging and disability networks, explore new approaches for resolving problem areas, elevate the visibility and broaden the perspectives of stakeholders, and set the stage for future policy actions. Forum sponsors and members include federal agencies, health professional associations, private sector businesses, academics, and consumers. Fostering Independence, Participation, and Healthy Aging Through Technology summarizes this workshop.
Main Description
The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the National Research Council (NRC) have had prominent roles in discussions of aging, disability, and technology for decades. In 1978, Aging and Medical Education (IOM, 1978) raised national awareness of the challenges to physicians posed by the aging of the U.S. population. Thirty years later, Retooling for an Aging America highlighted concerns for the entire health care workforce in view of the aging of the population, including the role of technology in caring for older populations. The 1988 report The Aging Population in the 21st Century examined social, economic, and demographic changes among older adults, as well as many health-related topics: health promotion and disease prevention; quality of life; health care system financing and use; and the quality of care-- especially long-term care. In 1991, the landmark report Disability in America laid out a national agenda to prevent disability and improve the lives of people with disabling conditions. The 1997 report Enabling America: Assessing the Role of Rehabilitation Science and Engineering examined the knowledge base of rehabilitation science and engineering and proposed ways to translate scientific findings into interventions that produce better health. And the 2007 report The Future of Disability in America examined progress made since the earlier reports and looked at continuing barriers that limit the independence, productivity, and participation in community life of people with disabilities. All these reports were produced by committees appointed in accordance with guidelines of the National Academies and met multiples times to compile and review evidence, reach consensus on conclusions and recommendations, draft a report of the committee, and then modify that draft report in response to comments from outside reviewers. The IOM and NRC have also held several workshops related to aging, disability, and technology and published summary reports, such as Technology for Adaptive Aging and Grand Challenges of Our Aging Society. The IOM and NRC also convene groups that take a different approach to issues of pressing national and international importance. Often known as forums or roundtables, these groups meet regularly to foster dialogue and confront issues of mutual interest and concern among a broad range of stakeholders. They can convene workshops, initiate cooperative projects among members, commission independently authored articles, and generate ideas for independent consensus studies. In 2012 the IOM and NRC joined together to establish the Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence to provide a neutral venue for broad-ranging discussions among the many stakeholders involved with aging and disability. The goals of the forum are to highlight areas in which the coordination of the aging and disability networks is strong, examine the challenges involved in aligning the aging and disability networks, explore new approaches for resolving problem areas, elevate the visibility and broaden the perspectives of stakeholders, and set the stage for future policy actions. Forum sponsors and members include federal agencies, health professional associations, private sector businesses, academics, and consumers. Fostering Independence, Participation, and Healthy Aging Through Technology summarizes this workshop.
Table of Contents
Introduction and Themes of the Workshopp. 1
Workshop Statement of Taskp. 2
Organization of the Workshop Summaryp. 3
Themes of the Workshopp. 4
The Promise of Technologyp. 7
Getting Technologies Out of the Laboratoryp. 7
Examples of Technological Innovationsp. 12
The Center for Aging Services Technologiesp. 15
The Leonard Florence Center for Livingp. 17
Technologies to Promote Activities of Daily Living and Independencep. 21
Promoting Independence for Individualsp. 21
Promoting Independence in the Environmentp. 24
Technologies to Promote Community Integration and Participation Through Community Designp. 27
New Technologies for Accessible Transportationp. 27
Workplace Accommodationsp. 29
Technologies to Promote Community Integration and Participation Through Social Connectednessp. 35
Web Accessibilityp. 35
Cloud Computingp. 38
Health Management and Promotionp. 41
Health Monitoringp. 41
Rehabilitation Sciencep. 44
Health Behaviorp. 46
Reflections on the Presentationsp. 49
Overcoming Barriers of Cost and Awarenessp. 50
The Interface with the Workplacep. 51
The Potential of the Webp. 52
Getting Technology into the Hands of Consumersp. 54
A Rich Agendap. 55
Referencesp. 57
Appendixes
Workshop Agendap. 59
Speaker Biographical Sketchesp. 63
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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