Catalogue


The New York City draft riots [electronic resource] : their significance for American society and politics in the age of the Civil War /
Iver Bernstein.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1991, c1990.
description
ix, 363 p., [8] p. of plates : ill.
ISBN
0195071301 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1991, c1990.
isbn
0195071301 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11462311
 
Includes bibliography: p. 341-347 and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Iver Bernstein is Associate Professor of History at Washington University, St. Louis
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1990-05:
Bernstein (Washington University, St. Louis) devotes less than a quarter of his book to New York's Civil War draft riots themselves, already thoroughly described in Adrian Cook's The Armies of the Streets (1974). Instead, he uses the riots to uncover social cleavages among rioters, merchants, and industrialists, which he then traces to their prewar origins in the social changes experienced by a modernizing city. Bernstein concludes by showing that the social upheavals symbolized by the riots ended not with the appearance of troops in July 1863, but in 1872, with the consolidation of New York's elites in such a way that lower-class political influence was stymied. Bernstein has used richly varied sources. In his imaginatively argued text (reminiscent in approach to Sean Wilentz's Chants Democratic, 1984), he discusses topics as diverse as changing work patterns, labor organization, organized philanthrophy, racial and ethnic conflict, and Boss Tweed. Although this work will evoke challenges, it is a major effort at integrating the complex historical strands of the mid-19th-century city and it belongs in every college and university library. -P. F. Field, Ohio University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Not since David Montgomery's Beyond Equality (1967) has the relationshipbetween Civil War politics and the social history of the urban-industrial Northbeen explored so successfully as in this study."--Journal of AmericanHistory
"An outstanding piece of social, economic, and political history,suggesting the benefits of integrating new and older historiography, the bookalso illustrates a pitfall or two that historians may wish to keep inmind.....An excellent, revelatory book....His writing is clear and his immenseresearch shines on every page."--Reviews in American History
"Bernstein convincingly demonstrates the validity of a class analysis inexplaining a little understood but important epoch in the history of New YorkCity."--Times Higher Educational Supplement
"Bernstein provides the most in-depth study of a Northern community experiencing war and of the draft riots that changed much thinking about the meaning and direction of the war...A touchstone for community studies of the wartime North."--Library Journal
"Detailed and sophisticated....An impressive book. Bernstein displaysingenuity in conceiving of the riots as something more than an abrupt, momentaryepisode, and he has dug deep to locate sources....Clearly the new interpretiveauthority."--Georgia Historical Quarterly
"Especially appealing....When Bernstein crosses historical genres, it's analmost synesthetic pleasure....The New York City Draft Riots establishes a worldas it was lived in. Its outline shows clearly against the backdrop of our ownpopulist racism, in what is still the unreconstructed North."--VillageVoice
"If W.E.B. DuBois made the case for seeeing 'the kernel and meaning of thelabor movement' in the activity of the slaves and freedmen, Bernstein can now besaid to have done the same thing for the Draft Riots."--Journal of SocialHistory
"If W.E.B. Du Bois made the case for seeing 'the kernel and meaning of thelabor movement' in the activity of the slaves and freedmen, Bernstein can now besaid to have done the same thing for the Draft Riots."--Journal of SocialHistory
"An original work in the historiography of Civil War America and labor history, and also synthesizes much of the current historical research. It stimulates and provokes. Most important, it recaptures much of the world we have lost."--New York Times Book Review "Especially appealing....When Bernstein crosses historical genres, it's an almost synesthetic pleasure....The New York City Draft Riotsestablishes a world as it was lived in. Its outline shows clearly against the backdrop of our own populist racism, in what is still the unreconstructed North."--Village Voice "An outstanding piece of social, economic, and political history, suggesting the benefits of integrating new and older historiography, the book also illustrates a pitfall or two that historians may wish to keep in mind.....An excellent, revelatory book....His writing is clear and his immense research shines on every page."--Reviews in American History "Detailed and sophisticated....An impressive book. Bernstein displays ingenuity in conceiving of the riots as something more than an abrupt, momentary episode, and he has dug deep to locate sources....Clearly the new interpretive authority."--Georgia Historical Quarterly "Not since David Montgomery'sBeyond Equality(1967) has the relationship between Civil War politics and the social history of the urban-industrial North been explored so successfully as in this study."--Journal of American History
"Adds to our understanding of the complex social and ideological divisionswithin the belligerent society called the North and their effects on the war forthe Union and its Gilded Age aftermath."--American Literary History
"[A]n intriguing and important interpretation of political and economic developments in New York City at a formative moment in history."--Journal of American Ethnic History
"An original work in the historiography of Civil War America and labor history, and also synthesizes much of the current historical research. It stimulates and provokes. Most important, it recaptures much of the world we have lost."--New York Times Book Review
"An original work in the historiography of Civil War America and labor history, and also synthesizes much of the current historical research. It stimulates and provokes. Most important, it recaptures much of the world we have lost."--New York Times Book Review "Especially appealing....When Bernstein crosses historical genres, it's an almost synesthetic pleasure....The New York City Draft Riots establishes a world as it was lived in. Its outline shows clearly against the backdrop of our own populist racism, in what is still the unreconstructed North."--Village Voice "An outstanding piece of social, economic, and political history, suggesting the benefits of integrating new and older historiography, the book also illustrates a pitfall or two that historians may wish to keep in mind.....An excellent, revelatory book....His writing is clear and his immense research shines on every page."--Reviews in American History "Detailed and sophisticated....An impressive book. Bernstein displays ingenuity in conceiving of the riots as something more than an abrupt, momentary episode, and he has dug deep to locate sources....Clearly the new interpretive authority."--Georgia Historical Quarterly "Not since David Montgomery's Beyond Equality (1967) has the relationship between Civil War politics and the social history of the urban-industrial North been explored so successfully as in this study."--Journal of American History
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Summaries
Main Description
For five days in July 1863, at the height of the Civil War, New York City was under siege. Angry rioters burned draft offices, closed factories, destroyed railroad tracks and telegraph lines, and hunted policemen and soldiers. Before long, the rioters turned their murderous wrath against the black community. In the end, at least 105 people were killed, making the draft riots the most violent insurrection in American history. In this vividly written book, Iver Bernstein tells the compelling story of the New York City draft riots. He details how what began as a demonstration against the first federal draft soon expanded into a sweeping assault against the local institutions and personnel of Abraham Lincoln's Republican Party as well as a grotesque race riot. Bernstein identifies participants, dynamics, causes and consequences, and demonstrates that the "winners" and "losers" of the July 1863 crisis were anything but clear, even after five regiments rushed north from Gettysburg restored order. In a tour de force of historical detection, Bernstein shows that to evaluate the significance of the riots we must enter the minds and experiences of a cast of characters--Irish and German immigrant workers, Wall Street businessmen who frantically debated whether to declare martial law, nervous politicians in Washington and at City Hall. Along the way, he offers new perspectives on a wide range of topics: Civil War society and politics, patterns of race, ethnic and class relations, the rise of organized labor, styles of leadership, philanthropy and reform, strains of individualism, and the rise of machine politics in Boss Tweed's Tammany regime. An in-depth study of one of the most troubling and least understood crises in American history,The New York City Draft Riotsis the first book to reveal the broader political and historical context--the complex of social, cultural and political relations--that made the bloody events of July 1863 possible.
Main Description
For five days in July 1863, at the height of the Civil War, New York City was under siege. Angry rioters burned draft offices, closed factories, destroyed railroad tracks and telegraph lines, and hunted policemen and soldiers. Before long, the rioters turned their murderous wrath against the black community. In the end, at least 105 people were killed, making the draft riots the most violent insurrection in American history. In this vividly written book, Iver Bernstein tells the compelling story of the New York City draft riots. He details how what began as a demonstration against the first federal draft soon expanded into a sweeping assault against the local institutions and personnel of Abraham Lincoln's Republican Party as well as a grotesque race riot. Bernstein identifies participants, dynamics, causes and consequences, and demonstrates that the "winners" and "losers" of the July 1863 crisis were anything but clear, even after five regiments rushed north from Gettysburg restored order. In a tour de force of historical detection, Bernstein shows that to evaluate the significance of the riots we must enter the minds and experiences of a cast of characters--Irish and German immigrant workers, Wall Street businessmen who frantically debated whether to declare martial law, nervous politicians in Washington and at City Hall. Along the way, he offers new perspectives on a wide range of topics: Civil War society and politics, patterns of race, ethnic and class relations, the rise of organized labor, styles of leadership, philanthropy and reform, strains of individualism, and the rise of machine politics in Boss Tweed's Tammany regime. An in-depth study of one of the most troubling and least understood crises in American history, The New York City Draft Riots is the first book to reveal the broader political and historical context--the complex of social, cultural and political relations--that made the bloody events of July 1863 possible.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. xii
Introductionp. 3
Draft Riots And The Social Order
A Multiplicity of Grievancesp. 17
The Two Tempers of Dracop. 43
Origins Of The Crisis, 1850s And 1860s
Workers and Consolidationp. 75
Merchants Dividedp. 125
Industrialistsp. 162
Resolutions Of The Crisis, 1860s And 1870s
The Rise and Decline of Tweed's Tammany Hallp. 195
1872p. 237
Epilogue: The Draft Riots' Lost Significancep. 259
Appendices and Mapsp. 265
Notesp. 287
Bibliographical Essayp. 341
Indexp. 349
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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