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Augustine ; with an English translation by James Houston Baxter.
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2014.
description
1 online resource
ISBN
9780674992641 (print)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2014.
isbn
9780674992641 (print)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
Letters of Augustine (354-430CE) are important for the study of ecclesiastical history and Augustine's relations with other theologians. Augustinus (354-430 CE), son of a pagan, Patricius of Tagaste in North Africa, and his Christian wife Monica, while studying in Africa to become a rhetorician, plunged into a turmoil of philosophical and psychological doubts in search of truth, joining for a time the Manichaean society. He became a teacher of grammar at Tagaste, and lived much under the influence of his mother and his friend Alypius. About 383 he went to Rome and soon after to Milan as a teacher of rhetoric, being now attracted by the philosophy of the Sceptics and of the Neo-Platonists. His studies of Paul's letters with Alypius and the preaching of Bishop Ambrose led in 386 to his rejection of all sensual habits and to his famous conversion from mixed beliefs to Christianity. He returned to Tagaste and there founded a religious community. In 395 or 396 he became Bishop of Hippo, and was henceforth engrossed with duties, writing and controversy. He died at Hippo during the successful siege by the Vandals. From Augustine's large output the Loeb Classical Library offers that great autobiography the Confessions (in two volumes); City of God (seven volumes), which unfolds God's action in the progress of the world's history, and propounds the superiority of Christian beliefs over pagan in adversity; and a selection of Letters which are important for the study of ecclesiastical history and Augustine's relations with other theologians.
language note
Text in Latin with English translation on facing pages.
catalogue key
11402997
technical details
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
 
Includes bibliography and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Augustinus (354-430 CE), son of a pagan, Patricius of Tagaste in North Africa, and his Christian wife Monica, while studying in Africa to become a rhetorician, plunged into a turmoil of philosophical and psychological doubts in search of truth, joining for a time the Manichaean society. He became a teacher of grammar at Tagaste, and lived much under the influence of his mother and his friend Alypius. About 383 he went to Rome and soon after to Milan as a teacher of rhetoric, being now attracted by the philosophy of the Sceptics and of the Neo-Platonists. His studies of Paul's letters with Alypius and the preaching of Bishop Ambrose led in 386 to his rejection of all sensual habits and to his famous conversion from mixed beliefs to Christianity. He returned to Tagaste and there founded a religious community. In 395 or 396 he became Bishop of Hippo, and was henceforth engrossed with duties, writing and controversy. He died at Hippo during the successful siege by the Vandals. From Augustine's large output the Loeb Classical Library offers that great autobiography the Confessions (in two volumes); On the City of God (seven volumes), which unfolds God's action in the progress of the world's history, and propounds the superiority of Christian beliefs over pagan in adversity; and a selection of Letters which are important for the study of ecclesiastical history and Augustine's relations with other theologians.
Main Description
Augustinus (354430 CE), son of a pagan, Patricius of Tagaste in North Africa, and his Christian wife Monica, while studying in Africa to become a rhetorician, plunged into a turmoil of philosophical and psychological doubts in search of truth, joining for a time the Manichaean society. He became a teacher of grammar at Tagaste, and lived much under the influence of his mother and his friend Alypius. About 383 he went to Rome and soon after to Milan as a teacher of rhetoric, being now attracted by the philosophy of the Sceptics and of the Neo-Platonists. His studies of Paul's letters with Alypius and the preaching of Bishop Ambrose led in 386 to his rejection of all sensual habits and to his famous conversion from mixed beliefs to Christianity. He returned to Tagaste and there founded a religious community. In 395 or 396 he became Bishop of Hippo, and was henceforth engrossed with duties, writing and controversy. He died at Hippo during the successful siege by the Vandals. From Augustine's large output the Loeb Classical Library offers that great autobiography the Confessions (in two volumes); City of God (seven volumes), which unfolds God's action in the progress of the world's history, and propounds the superiority of Christian beliefs over pagan in adversity; and a selection of Letters which are important for the study of ecclesiastical history and Augustine's relations with other theologians.
Main Description
Augustinus (354-430 CE ), son of a pagan, Patricius of Tagaste in North Africa, and his Christian wife Monica, while studying in Africa to become a rhetorician, plunged into a turmoil of philosophical and psychological doubts in search of truth, joining for a time the Manichaean society. He became a teacher of grammar at Tagaste, and lived much under the influence of his mother and his friend Alypius. About 383 he went to Rome and soon after to Milan as a teacher of rhetoric, being now attracted by the philosophy of the Sceptics and of the Neo-Platonists. His studies of Paul's letters with Alypius and the preaching of Bishop Ambrose led in 386 to his rejection of all sensual habits and to his famous conversion from mixed beliefs to Christianity. He returned to Tagaste and there founded a religious community. In 395 or 396 he became Bishop of Hippo, and was henceforth engrossed with duties, writing and controversy. He died at Hippo during the successful siege by the Vandals. From Augustine's large output the Loeb Classical Library offers that great autobiography the Confessions (in two volumes); On the City of God (seven volumes), which unfolds God's action in the progress of the world's history, and propounds the superiority of Christian beliefs over pagan in adversity; and a selection of Letters which are important for the study of ecclesiastical history and Augustine's relations with other theologians.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Chronology
Bibliography Letters
Ep. II
Ep. IV
Ep. X
Ep. XV
Ep. XVI
Ep. XVII
Ep. XXI
Ep. XXII
Ep. XXVIII
Ep. XXIX
Ep. XXXIV
Ep. XXXVII
Ep. XXXVIII
Ep. XLII
Ep. XLVIII
Ep. L
Ep. LX
Ep. LXV
Ep. LXVI
Ep. LXVII
Ep. LXXXIII
Ep. LXXXIV
Ep. LXXXVI
Ep. XCI
Ep. XCVII
Ep. XCIX
Ep. C
Ep. CI
Ep. CX
Ep. CXV
Ep. CXXII
Ep. CXXIV
Ep. CXXVI
Ep. CXXXIII
Ep. CXLIV
Ep. CXLVI
Ep. CL
Ep. CLIX
Ep. CLXXIII
Ep. CLXXIV
Ep. CLXXIX
Ep. CLXXXIX
Ep. CXCI
Ep. CXCII
Ep. CC
Ep. CCIII
Ep. CCIX
Ep. CCX
Ep. CCXI
Ep. CCXIV
Ep. CCXX
Ep. CCXXVII
Ep. CCXXIX
Ep. CCXXXI
Ep. CCXXXII
Ep. CCXLV
Ep. CCXLVI
Ep. CCLIV
Ep. CCLVIII
Ep. CCLXII
Ep. CCLXVIII
Ep. CCLXIX
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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