Catalogue


Greek bucolic poets : Theocritus. Bion. Moschus [electronic resource] /
Theocritus, Bion, Moschus ; with an English translation by J.M. Edmonds.
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2014.
description
1 online resource
ISBN
9780674990319 (print)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2014.
isbn
9780674990319 (print)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
Theocritus (third century BCE) was the founder of bucolic poetry. The extant poems of Moschus (second century BCE) and Bion (probably second and first centuries BCE) are not really bucolic, but Bion's Lament for Adonis is floridly brilliant. Pattern poems are found in the Greek Anthology, a work of many centuries. Theocritus of the third century BCE, born at Syracuse, travelled widely in the Greek world. Having studied poetry at Cos with poet and critic Philitas, he composed poetry under patronage, chiefly perhaps at Syracuse and Cos; and then went to Alexandria in Egypt, whose King Ptolemy II (died 246 BCE), pupil of Philitas, befriended him. Here (and at Cos?) he spent the rest of his life. Most lovable of Greek versemakers, Theocritus was the founder of bucolic or pastoral poetry. Of his so-called "Idylls," "little forms" or pieces (not all are genuine), ten are about pastoral life real or idealised; several are small epics (three are hymns); two are beautiful "occasional" poems (one about a country walk, one to accompany a gift of a distaff for the wife of his friend Nicias); six are love-poems; several are mimes, striking pictures of common life; and three are specially expressive of his own feelings. The 24 "Epigrams" were apparently inscribed on works of art. Moschus of Syracuse, 2nd century BCE, came next. As a grammarian he wrote a (lost) work on Rhodian dialect. Though he was classed as bucolic, his extant poetry (mainly Runaway Love and the story of Europa) is not really pastoral, the Lament for Bion not being Moschus's work. Megara may be by Theocritus; but The Dead Adonis is much later. Bion of Phlossa near Smyrna lived in Sicily, probably late 2nd and early 1st century BCE. Most of the extant poems are not really bucolic, but Lament for Adonis is floridly brilliant. The so-called "Pattern-Poems," included in the bucolic tradition, are found also in the Greek Anthology.
language note
Text in Greek with English translation on facing pages.
catalogue key
11402053
technical details
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
 
Includes bibliography and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Theocritus of the third century BCE, born at Syracuse, travelled widely in the Greek world. Having studied poetry at Cos with poet and critic Philitas, he composed poetry under patronage, chiefly perhaps at Syracuse and Cos; and then went to Alexandria in Egypt, whose King Ptolemy II (died 246 BCE), pupil of Philitas, befriended him. Here (and at Cos?) he spent the rest of his life. Most lovable of Greek versemakers, Theocritus was the founder of bucolic or pastoral poetry. Of his so-called Idylls, 'Little forms' or pieces (not all are genuine), ten are about pastoral life real or idealised; several are small epics (three are hymns); two are beautiful 'occasional' poems (one about a country walk, one to accompany a gift of a distaff for the wife of his friend Nicias); six are love-poems; several are mimes, striking pictures of common life; and three are specially expressive of his own feelings. The 24 'Epigrams' were apparently inscribed on works of art. Moschus of Syracuse, 2nd century BCE, came next. As a grammarian he wrote a (lost) work on Rhodian dialect. Though he was classed as bucolic, his extant poetry (mainly 'Runaway Love' and the story of 'Europa') is not really pastoral, the 'Lament for Bion' not being Moschus's work. 'Megara' may be by Theocritus; but 'The Dead Adonis' is much later. Bion of Phlossa near Smyrna lived in Sicily, probably late 2nd and early 1st century BCE. Most of the extant poems are not really bucolic, but 'Lament for Adonis' is floridly brilliant. The so-called Pattern-Poems, included in the bucolic tradition, are found also in the Greek Anthology.
Main Description
Theocritus of the third century BCE , born at Syracuse, travelled widely in the Greek world. Having studied poetry at Cos with poet and critic Philitas, he composed poetry under patronage, chiefly perhaps at Syracuse and Cos; and then went to Alexandria in Egypt, whose King Ptolemy II (died 246 BCE ), pupil of Philitas, befriended him. Here (and at Cos?) he spent the rest of his life. Most lovable of Greek versemakers, Theocritus was the founder of bucolic or pastoral poetry. Of his so-called Idylls, 'Little forms' or pieces (not all are genuine), ten are about pastoral life real or idealised; several are small epics (three are hymns); two are beautiful 'occasional' poems (one about a country walk, one to accompany a gift of a distaff for the wife of his friend Nicias); six are love-poems; several are mimes, striking pictures of common life; and three are specially expressive of his own feelings. The 24 'Epigrams' were apparently inscribed on works of art. Moschus of Syracuse, 2nd century BCE , came next. As a grammarian he wrote a (lost) work on Rhodian dialect. Though he was classed as bucolic, his extant poetry (mainly 'Runaway Love' and the story of 'Europa') is not really pastoral, the 'Lament for Bion' not being Moschus's work. 'Megara' may be by Theocritus; but 'The Dead Adonis' is much later. Bion of Phlossa near Smyrna lived in Sicily, probably late 2nd and early 1st century BCE . Most of the extant poems are not really bucolic, but 'Lament for Adonis' is floridly brilliant. The so-called Pattern-Poems, included in the bucolic tradition, are found also in the Greek Anthology.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Bibliography
Introductory Poems
Theocritus Poems I-XXX
Inscriptions Bion Moschus Megara
The Dead Adonis
The Pattern-Poems
Index Of Proper
Names
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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