Catalogue

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Yalta : the price of peace /
S. M. Plokhy.
imprint
New York : Penguin Books, 2011.
description
xxviii, 451 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0143118927, 9780143118923
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Penguin Books, 2011.
isbn
0143118927
9780143118923
contents note
Operation argonaut -- A warriors' summit -- A new world order -- The wheels of compromise -- The spirit of Yalta -- The coming storm.
abstract
In February 1945, three of the twentieth century's towering figures - Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin - met at Yalta as their armies converged on Berlin. Each came with sharply different views of what the world should look like after the war. S. M. Plokhy draws on newly declassified Soviet documents to lay to rest the myth of Yalta. --Back cover.
catalogue key
11397048
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 409-430) and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Lionel Gelber Prize, CAN, 2011 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2009-11-23:
Harvard historian Plokhy (Unmaking Imperial Russia) enhances his stature as a scholar of modern Russia in this convincing revisionist analysis of the February 1945 Yalta conference. Plokhy makes sophisticated use of Soviet sources to make a case that Yalta was anything but the diplomatic defeat for the West so often depicted in cold war literature. He describes Yalta in the context of a clash between different approaches to international relations. FDR was a liberal internationalist. Churchill and Stalin saw the world in terms of power and interests. And with the Red Army only 50 miles from Berlin, "Stalin held the trump cards." Plokhy's detailed and highly engrossing narrative of the negotiations shows that the West did reasonably well. Roosevelt's agenda was global. He secured Stalin's commitment to join the war against Japan and participate in the U.N. Churchill, focused on Europe, preserved British interests in the Mediterranean. Stalin achieved recognition of the U.S.S.R.'s great-power status and a sphere of influence in Eastern Europe. The Yalta agreement was not the first conflict of the cold war but just a step toward a cold war that emerged only after three more years of failed negotiations. Maps. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-02-01:
Stalin, Churchill, and Roosevelt met at Yalta in January 1945 to plot out the finale of World War II and to begin dividing up the great powers' responsibilities. President Roosevelt had not yet returned to America when the arguments began. Had he given up too much? Was he too weakened by overwork and illness? Did Alger Hiss or Guy Burgess betray crucial secrets? Did Yalta cause the Cold War? Newly declassified Soviet archives and the diaries of many secondary players contribute to this major reconsideration of Yalta. Plokhy (history, Harvard; Unmaking Imperial Russia) deals with an enormous cast of characters and an equally enormous mass of detail, marshaling it into an interesting and readable narrative and concluding that Roosevelt didn't do too badly. VERDICT Readers interested in World War II and diplomatic history, who may also want to look at Fraser J. Harbutt's Yalta 1945, are likely to find this detailed and revisionist account worth reading. They will also enjoy Andrew Roberts's Masters and Commanders: How Four Titans Won the War in the West, 1941-1945.-Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Harvard historian S.M. Plokhy has produced a gripping narrative of the eight days in February 1945 when the Big Three - Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin - convened the Yalta summit as World War II raged on.
The end of the Cold War has given scholars a chance to step back and take a more dispassionate look at those eight consequential days in February 1945. It is hard to imagine anyone doing so better than S.M. Plokhy in 'Yalta: The Price of Peace' ... colorful and gripping ...
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Imagine you could eavesdrop on a dinner party with three of the most fascinating historical figures of all time. In this book the author puts you in the room with Churchill, Stalin and Roosevelt as they meet at a climatic turning point in the war to hash out the terms of peace.
Main Description
'A colorful and gripping portrait of the three aging leaders at their historic encounter.' -The Wall Street JournalFor eight fateful days in 1945, three of the towering figures of the twentieth century-FDR, Churchill, and Stalin-met at a resort town on the Black Sea to decide on a strategy to defeat Germany and Japan, and to carve up the world. For more than sixty years, opinion has been bitterly divided on what they achieved. Did Yalta pave the way to the Cold War? Did FDR give too much to Stalin? In this groundbreaking book, Harvard historian S. M. Plokhy draws on newly declassified Soviet documents and unpublished diaries and letters of the participants to set the record straight.
Main Description
"A colorful and gripping portrait of the three aging leaders at their historic encounter." - The Wall Street Journal For eight fateful days in 1945, three of the towering figures of the twentieth century-FDR, Churchill, and Stalin-met at a resort town on the Black Sea to decide on a strategy to defeat Germany and Japan, and to carve up the world. For more than sixty years, opinion has been bitterly divided on what they achieved. Did Yalta pave the way to the Cold War? Did FDR give too much to Stalin? In this groundbreaking book, Harvard historian S. M. Plokhy draws on newly declassified Soviet documents and unpublished diaries and letters of the participants to set the record straight.
Main Description
"A colorful and gripping portrait of the three aging leaders at their historic encounter." -The Wall Street Journal For eight fateful days in 1945, three of the towering figures of the twentieth century-FDR, Churchill, and Stalin-met at a resort town on the Black Sea to decide on a strategy to defeat Germany and Japan, and to carve up the world. For more than sixty years, opinion has been bitterly divided on what they achieved. Did Yalta pave the way to the Cold War? Did FDR give too much to Stalin? In this groundbreaking book, Harvard historian S. M. Plokhy draws on newly declassified Soviet documents and unpublished diaries and letters of the participants to set the record straight.
Main Description
'A colorful and gripping portrait of the three aging leaders at their historic encounter.'- THE WALL STREET JOURNALIn February 1945, three of the twentieth century's towering figures-Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin-met at Yalta, a resort town on the Black Sea, as their armies converged on Berlin. Each came with sharply different views of what the world should look like after the war. Over the course of eight fateful days they partitioned Germany, approved the most aggressive aerial bombing campaign in history, redrew the borders of Eastern Europe, and created a new international organization to settle future disputes. Two months later, Roosevelt was dead, Stalin was strengthening his grip on Poland, and Churchill was on the cusp of a humiliating electoral defeat.For sixty-five years, opinion has been bitterly divided on what they achieved. Did Yalta pave the way to the Cold War? Did an ailing FDR give too much to Stalin? In this groundbreaking book, S. M. Plokhy draws on newly declassified Soviet documents to lay to rest the myth of Yalta and paints an original and surprising portrait of FDR as a wartime leader.'Like Munich, Yalta is shorthand for a pivotal historical event with all the loaded emotional baggage of its consequences . . . Plokhy brings the players to life, making a familiar story feel lively and fresh.'- THE WASHINGTON POST'A wonderful work of history: brilliantly researched and judiciously argued.'- Robert Dallek, author of AN UNFINISHED LIFE: JOHN F. KENNEDY
Main Description
Imagine you could eavesdrop on a dinner party with three of the most fascinating historical figures of all time. In this landmark book, a gifted Harvard historian puts you in the room with Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt as they meet at a climactic turning point in the war to hash out the terms of the peace. The ink wasn't dry when the recriminations began. The conservatives who hated Roosevelt's New Deal accused him of selling out. Was he too sick? Did he give too much in exchange for Stalin's promise to join the war against Japan? Could he have done better in Eastern Europe? Both Left and Right would blame Yalta for beginning the Cold War. Plokhy's conclusions, based on unprecedented archival research, are surprising. He goes against conventional wisdom-cemented during the Cold War- and argues that an ailing Roosevelt did better than we think. Much has been made of FDR's handling of the Depression; here we see him as wartime chief. Yalta is authoritative, original, vividly- written narrative history, and is sure to appeal to fans of Margaret MacMillan's bestseller Paris 1919.
Main Description
In February 1945, three of the twentieth century's towering figures-Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin-met at Yalta, a resort town on the Black Sea, as their armies converged on Berlin. Each came with sharply different views of what the world should look like after the war. Over the course of eight fateful days they partitioned Germany, approved the most aggressive aerial bombing campaign in history, redrew the borders of Eastern Europe, and created a new international organization to settle future disputes. Two months later, Roosevelt was dead, Stalin was strengthening his grip on Poland, and Churchill was on the cusp of a humiliating electoral defeat. For sixty-five years, opinion has been bitterly divided on what they achieved. Did Yalta pave the way to the Cold War? Did an ailing FDR give too much to Stalin? In this groundbreaking book, S. M. Plokhy draws on newly declassified Soviet documents to lay to rest the myth of Yalta and paints an original and surprising portrait of FDR as a wartime leader. Book jacket.
Main Description
In this landmark book, a gifted Harvard historian puts readers in the room with Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt as they meet at a climactic turning point during the Second World War to hash out the terms of the peace.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. xv
Introductionp. xxiii
Operation Argonaut
The President's Journeyp. 3
Meeting on Maltap. 20
The Tsar's Playgroundp. 36
The Red Hostp. 53
A Warriors' Summit
Reunion of the Big Threep. 69
The Winter Offensivep. 80
The German Questionp. 92
Spoils of Warp. 102
A New World Order
The Security Councilp. 117
In the F├╝hrer's Shadowp. 128
Dividing the Balkansp. 139
The Battle for Polandp. 152
"What Would the Ukrainians Say?"p. 166
The Diplomats' Chessboard
Counting Votes in the United Nationsp. 183
Stalemate on Polandp. 196
The Bomblinep. 207
The Far Eastern Blitzp. 216
"Allies Should Not Deceive"p. 229
The Wheels of Compromise
A Polish Surrenderp. 241
The Fate of Germanyp. 252
Liberated Europe and the Balkan Dealp. 263
Iran, Turkey, and the Empirep. 272
Secret Agreementsp. 285
Prisoners of Warp. 293
The Spirit of Yalta
The Last Supperp. 309
Crossing the Finish Linep. 317
Days of Hopep. 328
The Coming Storm
Signs of Troublep. 341
Spy Warsp. 353
Stalin Digs Inp. 366
After Rooseveltp. 376
Epiloguep. 389
Acknowledgmentsp. 405
Notesp. 409
Indexp. 431
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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