Catalogue


Visions of an unseen world [electronic resource] : ghost beliefs and ghost stories in eighteenth-century England /
by Sasha Handley.
imprint
London ; Brookfield, Vt. : Pickering & Chatto, 2007.
description
ix, 287 p. : ill.
ISBN
1851968881 (hbk.), 9781851968886 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
London ; Brookfield, Vt. : Pickering & Chatto, 2007.
isbn
1851968881 (hbk.)
9781851968886 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11386795
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-277) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a very useful study of, and compendium of references to, ghosts beliefs and stories in early modern England.'
'Sasha Handley's excellent study of the meaning, recording and use of ghost stories in the 'long eighteenth century' is a refreshing and much needed study.'
'this is another significant historical study of ghost belief, ... Handley's work helps rescue ghost stories from the footnotes of History, and relocates them as a key element of the beliefs and culture surrounding death and the fate of the soul.'
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume describes the haunting of 18th century England. It provides an in-depth study of the production, circulation and consumption of English ghost stories during the Age of Reason.
Description for Reader
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Gothic Studies, Religious Studies, Print Culture
Main Description
This book describes the haunting of eighteenth-century England. It is the first in-depth study of the production, circulation and consumption of English ghost stories during the Age of Reason. This period saw the establishment of the ghost story as a literary genre. Handley combines close textual analysis with a broad conception of historical change. She examines a variety of mediums: ballads and chapbooks, newspapers, sermons, medical treatises and scientific journals, novels and plays. She relates the telling of ghost stories to wider changes associated with the Enlightenment, arguing that they played a key role in battles against atheism, republicanism, material excess and secularisation.
Table of Contents
Introduction: The Ghosts of Early Modern England
Restoration Hauntings
Printing the Preternatural in the Late Seventeenth Century
A New Canterbury Tale
Ghost Stories in the Periodical Press, c.1700 - c.1750
Confessional Cultures and Ghost Beliefs, c.1750 - c.1800
Landscapes of Belief and Everyday Life in Late Eighteenth-Century England
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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