Catalogue


Some stories are better than others [electronic resource] : doing what works in brief therapy and managed care /
Michael F. Hoyt.
imprint
Philadelphia, PA : Brunner/Mazel, c2000.
description
xvii, 320 p. : ill., port. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1583910417 (case : alk. paper), 9781583910412 (case : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
geographic term
More Details
imprint
Philadelphia, PA : Brunner/Mazel, c2000.
isbn
1583910417 (case : alk. paper)
9781583910412 (case : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11379715
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-303) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, March 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
There are countless stories that we deal with each day. There are the stories that we easily recognize as such: the novels we read, the movies we see, but there are may other more essential stories. These are the stories that we use to explain what happened to us twenty years ago or last week, those we use to explain why the world works the way it does, and those that we sue to "fix" the world when it doesn't work the way other stories said it should. And as the author points out in this collection of essays and interviews, some of these stories are better than others. This book is an investigation into which might be the better stories and how they can help clients reach their goals in therapy. The book contains fifteen essays and interviews written or co-written by Michael Hoyt. The collection represents Dr. Hoyt's recent thinking on helping clients with brief, future-oriented therapeutic approaches. Exploring a variety of post-modern, social constructionist, and solution-focused ideas in therapy, these essays try to offer ideas and reflections on doing what works to improve mental health. They also address the theoretical, practical, and ethical challenges produces by the managed care environment, giving the reader guidance in an area that is often confusing and, at times, alarming. Drawing on sports metaphors, literature, and movies, Dr. Hoyt offers a profound look at many of brief therapy's most pressing problems in an accessible package. It's depth of analysis, comprehensive coverage of brief therapy, and cutting-edge theory of future-oriented therapeutic approaches makes this collection a vital resource for all mental health professionals wrestling with time-limited treatment options in or out of managed care.
Main Description
There are countless stories that we deal with each day. There are the stories that we easily recognize as such: the novels we read, the movies we see, but there are may other more essential stories. These are the stories that we use to explain what happened to us twenty years ago or last week, those we use to explain why the world works the way it does, and those that we sue to "fix" the world when it doesn't work the way other stories said it should. And as the author points out in this collection of essays and interviews, some of these stories are better than others. This book is an investigation into which might be the better stories and how they can help clients reach their goals in therapy. The book contains fifteen essays and interviews written or co-written by Michael Hoyt. The collection represents Dr. Hoyt's recent thinking on helping clients with brief, future-oriented therapeutic approaches. Exploring a variety of post-modern, social constructionist, and solution-focused ideas in therapy,these essays try to offer ideas and reflections on doing what works to improve mental health. They also address the theoretical, practical, and ethical challenges produces by the managed care environment, giving the reader guidance in an area that is often confusing and, at times, alarming. Drawing on sports metaphors, literature, and movies, Dr. Hoyt offers a profound look at many of brief therapy's most pressing problems in an accessible package. It's depth of analysis, comprehensive coverage of brief therapy, and cutting-edge theory of future-oriented therapeutic approaches makes this collection a vital resource for all mental health professionals wrestling with time-limited treatment options in or out of managed care.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
It's Not My Therapy--It's the Client's Therapyp. 1
A Golfer's Guide to Brief Therapy (With Footnotes for Baseball Fans)p. 5
Some Stories Are Better Than Others: A Postmodern Pastichep. 17
Likely Future Trends and Attendant Ethical Concerns Regarding Managed Mental Health Carep. 77
Dilemmas of Postmodern Practice Under Managed Care and Some Pragmatics for Increasing the Likelihood of Treatment Authorizationp. 109
Interview I: Brief Therapy and Managed Carep. 119
Interview II: Autologue: Reflections on Brief Therapy, Social Constructionism, and Managed Carep. 135
Solution-Focused Couple Therapy: Helping Clients Construct Self-Fulfilling Realitiesp. 143
Solution-kup. 167
A Single-Session Therapy Retold: Evolving and Restoried Understandingsp. 169
What Can We Learn From Milton Erickson's Therapeutic Failures?p. 189
Unmuddying the Waters: A "Common Ground" Conferencep. 195
The Joy of Narrative: An Exercise for Learning From Our Internalized Clientsp. 201
Stage-Appropriate Change-Oriented Brief Therapy Strategiesp. 207
The Last Session in Brief Therapy: Why and How to Say "When"p. 237
Referencesp. 263
About the Authorp. 305
About the Co-Authorsp. 307
Creditsp. 309
Indexp. 313
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem