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The resilience of language [electronic resource] : what gesture creation in deaf children can tell us about how all children learn language /
Susan Goldin-Meadow.
imprint
New York, NY : Psychology Press, 2003.
description
xxi, 262 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1841690260 (alk. paper), 9781841690261 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Psychology Press, 2003.
isbn
1841690260 (alk. paper)
9781841690261 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11376671
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-250) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Imagine a child who has never seen or heard any language at all. Would such a child be able to invent a language on her own? Despite what one might guess, the children described in this book make it clear that the answer to this question is 'yes'. The children are congenitally deaf and cannot learn the spoken language that surrounds them. In addition, they have not yet been exposed to sign language, either by their hearing parents or their oral schools. Nevertheless, the children use their hands to communicate - they gesture - and those gestures take on many of the forms and functions of language. The properties of language that we find in the deaf children's gestures are just those properties that do not need to be handed down from generation to generation, but can be reinvented by a child de novo - the resilient properties of language. This book suggests that all children, deaf or hearing, come to language-learning ready to develop precisely these language properties. In this way, studies of gesture creation in deaf children can show us the way that children themselves have a large hand in shaping how language is learned.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'The Resilience of Language' argues that all children, deaf or hearing, come to language-learning ready to reinvent many properties of language. By looking at gesture creation among deaf children it becomes clear the extent to which children themselves shape how language is learned.
Main Description
Imagine a child who has never seen or heard any language at all. Would such a child be able to invent a language on her own? Despite what one might guess, the children described in this book make it clear that the answer to this question is 'yes'. The children are congenitally deaf and cannot learn the spoken language that surrounds them. In addition, they have not yet been exposed to sign language, either by their hearing parents or their oral schools. Nevertheless, the children use their hands to communicate--they gesture--and those gestures take on many of the forms and functions of language. The properties of language that we find in the deaf children's gestures are just those properties that do not need to be handed down from generation to generation, but can be reinvented by a childde novo- the resilient properties of language. This book suggests that all children, deaf or hearing, come to language-learning ready to develop precisely these language properties. In this way, studies of gesturecreation in deaf children can show us the way that children themselves have a large hand in shaping how language is learned.
Main Description
Imagine a child who has never seen or heard any language at all. Would such a child be able to invent a language on her own? Despite what one might guess, the children described in this book make it clear that the answer to this question is 'yes'. The children are congenitally deaf and cannot learn the spoken language that surrounds them. In addition, they have not yet been exposed to sign language, either by their hearing parents or their oral schools. Nevertheless, the children use their hands to communicate - they gesture - and those gestures take on many of the forms and functions of language. The properties of language that we find in the deaf children's gestures are just those properties that do not need to be handed down from generation to generation, but can be reinvented by a child de novo- the resilient properties of language. This book suggests that all children, deaf or hearing, come to language-learning ready to develop precisely these language properties. In this way, studies of gesture creation in deaf children can show us the way that children themselves have a large hand in shaping how language is learned.
Main Description
Imagine a child who has never seen or heard any language at all. Would such a child be able to invent a language on her own? Despite what one might guess, the children described in this book make it clear that the answer to this question is "yes." The properties of language that we find in deaf children's gestures are just those properties that do not need to be handed down from generation to generation, but can be reinvented by a child de novo -- the resilient properties of language. This book suggests that all children, deaf or hearing, come to language-learning ready to develop precisely these language properties.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Accompanying Website of Video Clipsp. xv
Introductionp. xvii
The Problem of Language-Learning
Out of the Mouths of Babesp. 3
How Do Children Learn Language?p. 13
Language-Learning Across the Globep. 21
Language-Learning by Handp. 31
Does More or Less Input Matter?p. 41
Language Development Without a Language Model
Background on Deafness and Language-Learningp. 55
How Do We Begin?p. 65
Wordsp. 71
The Parts of Wordsp. 83
Combining Words Into Simple Sentencesp. 97
Making Complex Sentences out of Simple Ones: Recursionp. 115
Building a Systemp. 125
Beyond the Here-and-Now: The Functions Gesture Servesp. 137
How Might Hearing Parents Foster Gesture Creation in Their Deaf Children?p. 151
Gesture Creation Across the Globep. 163
The Conditions That Foster Language and Language-Learning
How Do the Resilient Properties of Language Help Children Learn Language?p. 185
When Does Gesture Become Language?p. 199
Is Language Innate?p. 213
The Resilience of Languagep. 221
Referencesp. 233
Author Indexp. 251
Subject Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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