Catalogue


Religious identities in Henry VIII's England [electronic resource] /
Peter Marshall.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2006.
description
viii, 291 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0754653900 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2006.
isbn
0754653900 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction: Identifying religion in Henry VIII's England -- Evangelical conversion -- Fear, purgatory, and polemic -- The shooting of Robert Packington -- The debate over 'unwritten verities' -- The other black legend -- Forgery and miracles -- Mumpsimus and sumpsimus -- Is the Pope a Catholic? -- The burning of John Forest -- Catholic exiles.
catalogue key
11376358
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [277]-284) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2006
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Summaries
Main Description
In this volume Peter Marshall explores a wide range of evidence that underlines the complex web of overlapping and competing religious identities that Henry VIII's subjects were forced to assume as he sought to take control of the English church. Investigating broad issues of conversion, polemic and propaganda, scripture, exile, forgery and miracles, as well as looking at specific cases of individuals and events, a rich picture is built up of the ambiguities and paradoxes of the early reformation process in England. This book includes three entirely new chapters, and eight previously published but updated essays.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Investigating broad issues of conversion, polemic and propaganda, scripture, exile, forgery and miracles, as well as specific cases of individuals and events, Marshall's book builds up a picture of the ambiguities and paradoxes of the early reformation process in England.
Long Description
Consisting of three entirely new chapters, and eight previously published but updated, essays, this volume provides a fascinating insight into the complex religious developments of early sixteenth-century England. As Tudor religious history enters a 'post-revisionist' phase that acknowledges the strength and vitality of traditional religious culture, whilst reasserting the broad appeal of the evangelical message, this volume provides a timely reassessment and critique of the subject."
Long Description
Henry VIII's decision to declare himself supreme head of the church in England, and thereby set himself in opposition to the authority of the papacy, had momentous consequences for the country and his subjects. At a stroke people were forced to reconsider assumptions about their identity and loyalties, in rapidly shifting political and theological circumstances. Whilst many studies have investigated Catholic and Protestant identities during the reigns of Elizabeth and Mary, much less is understood about the processes of religious identity-formation during Henry's reign.In this volume Peter Marshall explores a wide range of evidence that underlines the complex web of overlapping and competing identities that people were forced to assume as a religiously conservative king sought to take control of his national church. Investigating broad issues of conversion, polemic and propaganda, scripture, exile, forgery and miracles, as well as looking at specific cases of individuals and events, a rich picture is built up of the ambiguities and paradoxes of the early reformation process in England.Consisting of three entirely new chapters, and eight previously published but updated essays, this volume provides a fascinating insight into the complex religious developments of early sixteenth-century England. As Tudor religious history enters a 'post-revisionist' phase that acknowledges the strength and vitality of traditional religious culture, whilst reasserting the broad appeal of the evangelical message, this volume provides a timely reassessment and critique of the subject.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction: Identifying religion in Henry VIII's England
Evangelical Directions: Travelling From and To: Evangelical conversion
Fear, purgatory and polemic
The shooting of Robert Packington
The debate over 'unwritten verities'
Henrician Reforms: Seen from Inside and Out: The other black legend
Forgery and miracles
Mumpsimus and Sumpsimus
Catholic Positions: With and Without the Pope: Is the Pope a Catholic?
The burning of John Forest
Catholic exiles
Appendix
Select bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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