Catalogue

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Marian moments in early modern British drama [electronic resource] /
edited by Regina Buccola, Lisa Hopkins.
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate Pub., c2007.
description
xx, 177 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0754656373 (alk. paper), 9780754656371 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate Pub., c2007.
isbn
0754656373 (alk. paper)
9780754656371 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
'Here in this garden' : the iconography of the Virgin Queen in Shakespeare's Richard II / Helen Ostovich -- 'One that's dead is quick' : virgin re-birth in All's well that ends well / Alison Findlay -- Inverting the Pietà in Shakespeare's King Lear / Katharine Goodland -- 'Black but beautiful' : Othello and the cult of the Black Madonna / Lisa Hopkins -- Desdemona and the Mariological theology of the will in Othello / Greg Maillet -- The wonder of women : virginity, sexuality and religio-politics in Marston's The tragedy of Sophonisba / Thomas Rist -- Easter scenes from an unholy tomb : Christian parody in The widow's tears / Alice Dailey -- Virgin fairies and imperial whores : the unstable ground of religious iconography in Thomas Dekker's The whore of Babylon / Regina Buccola -- Not kissing the (He)rod : Marian moments in The tragedy of Mariam / Stephanie Hodgson-Wright.
catalogue key
11367674
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-12-01:
This collection of essays by scholars of early modern English drama focuses on what Buccola (Roosevelt Univ.) and Hopkins (Sheffield Hallam Univ., UK) dub Marian moments--defined as "references to the Virgin Mary" that support the recent scholarly challenge to the assumption that "the Reformation worked in England." The reader is invited to find these references in the plays to be proof of "residual Catholic culture" in "Protestantized" England. The book's premise seems rather obvious, but at the same time much of the evidence presented seems tenuous. Another problem: though the essays on Shakespeare's plays are useful, the other essays focus on obscure plays with which only specialists are likely to be familiar. This said, readers may find compelling the suggestion that the "Marian resonance" might "provide new ways of teaching texts" or "constitute an argument for teaching neglected texts." The editors also judiciously point out that further investigation of these Marian references might shed more light on cultural attitudes toward women in the early modern period. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate students, researchers, and faculty. M. Cole Alfred State College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2007
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This collection concerns itself with the complex interplay between iconoclasm against images of the Virgin Mary in post-Reformation England and stage representations that evoke various 'Marian moments' from the medieval, Catholic past.
Long Description
Concerning itself with the complex interplay between iconoclasm against images of the Virgin Mary in post-Reformation England and stage representations that evoke various 'Marian moments' from the medieval, Catholic past, this collection answers the call for further investigation of the complex relationship between the fraught religio-political culture of the modern and the theater that it spawned. Joining historians in rejecting the received belief that Catholicism could be turned on and off like a water spigot in response to sixteenth-century religious reform, the early modern British theater scholars in this collection turn their attention to the vestiges of Catholic tradition and culture that leak out in stage imagery, plot devices, and characterization in ways that are not always clearly engaged in the business of Protestant panegyric or polemic. Among the questions they address are: What is the cultural function of dramatic Marian moments? Are Marian moments nostalgic for, or critical of, the 'Old Faith'? How do Marian moments negotiate the cultural trauma of iconoclasm and / or the Reformation in early modern England? Did these stage pictures of Mary provide subversive touchstones for the Old Faith of particular import to cryto-Catholic or recusant members of the audience?
Main Description
Concerning itself with the complex interplay between iconoclasm against images of the Virgin Mary in post-Reformation England and stage representations that evoke various 'Marian moments' from the medieval, Catholic past, this collection answers the call for further investigation the complex relationship between the fraught religio-political culture of the period and the theater that it spawned. Contributors analyze the vestiges of Catholic tradition and culture that leak out in stage imagery, plot devices, and characterization.
Main Description
Concerning itself with the complex interplay between iconoclasm against images of the Virgin Mary in post-Reformation England and stage representations that evoke various 'Marian moments' from the medieval, Catholic past, this collection answers the call for further investigation the complex relationship between the fraught religio-political culture of the period and the theater that it spawned. Contributors analyze the vestiges of Catholic tradition and culture that leak out in stage imagery, plot devices, and characterization. Concerning itself with the complex interplay between iconoclasm against images of the Virgin Mary in post-Reformation England and stage representations that evoke various 'Marian moments' from the medieval, Catholic past, this collection answers the call for further investigation of the complex relationship between the fraught religio-political culture of the early modern period and the theater that it spawned. Joining historians in rejecting the received belief that Catholicism could be turned on and off like a water spigot in response to sixteenth-century religious reform, the early modern British theater scholars in this collection turn their attention to the vestiges of Catholic tradition and culture that leak out in stage imagery, plot devices, and characterization in ways that are not always clearly engaged in the business of Protestant panegyric or polemic. Among the questions they address are: What is the cultural function of dramatic Marian moments? Are Marian moments nostalgic for, or critical of, the 'Old Faith'? How do Marian moments negotiate the cultural trauma of iconoclasm and / or the Reformation in early modern England? Did these stage pictures of Mary provide subversive touchstones for the Old Faith of particular import to crypto-Catholic or recusant members of the audience? Contents: Preface; Foreword; Introduction; 'Here in this garden': the iconography of the Virgin Queen in Shakespeare's Richard II', Helen Ostovich; 'One that's dead is quick': Virgin re-birth in All's Well That Ends Well, Alison Findlay; 'Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say': performing grief in Shakespeare's King Lear, Katharine Goodland; 'Black but beautiful': Othello and the cult of the Black Madonna, Lisa Hopkins; Desdemona and the Mariological theology of the will in Othello, Greg Maillet; The wonder of women: virginity, sexuality and religio-politics in Marston's The Tragedy of Sophonisba, Thomas Rist; Easter scenes from an unholy tomb: Christian parody in The Widow's Tears, Alice Dailey; Virgin fairies and imperial whores: the unstable ground of religious iconography in Thomas Dekker's The Whore of Babylon, Regina Buccola; Not kissing the (He)rod: The Tragedy of Mariam and the English Reformation, Stephanie Hodgson-Wright; Index. About the Author: Regina Buccola is Assiociate Professor of Literature and Language at Roosevelt University, USA. Lisa Hopkins is Professor of English at Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
Table of Contents
Preface
Foreword
Introduction
'Here in this garden': the iconography of the Virgin Queen in Shakespeare's Richard II'
'One that's dead is quick'
Virgin re-birth in All's Well That Ends Well
Inverting the Pietà in Shakespeare's King Lear
'Black but beautiful'
Othello and the cult of the Black Madonna
Desdemona and the Mariological theology of the will in Othello
The wonder of women: virginity, sexuality and religio-politics in Marston's The Tragedy of Sophonisba
Easter scenes from an unholy tomb
Christian parody in The Widow's Tears
Virgin fairies and imperial whores: the unstable ground of religious iconography in Thomas Dekker's The Whore of Babylon
Not kissing the (He)rod
The Tragedy of Mariam
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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