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The international impact of the Boer War [electronic resource] /
edited by Keith Wilson.
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2001.
description
vi, 214 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0312239734
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2001.
isbn
0312239734
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11363624
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-02-01:
This book is among the more informative opening salvos of the centenary of the Anglo-Boer War. Its introduction and 12 essays are part of an ongoing reevaluation of the causes and consequences of the war. Peter Henshaw's opening chapter on "origins" neatly summarizes most of the existing literature, charting a careful explanatory course between grand imperial strategy (and pre-emptive acts on the part of Britain) and the agency and design of Sir Alfred Milner. The motives of the various individual actors were different, with those in the field, and even some at home, scheming at cross-purposes with the decision-makers in London. Imperial issues are the subject of most of the chapters; there are insights into the machinations and considerations concerning the war of Germany, Portugal, Austria-Hungary, France, and even the US. The Delagoa Bay (Maputo) question is well considered, and the various diplomatic compromises and trade-offs are reexamined in interesting ways. But there is no chapter on the Transvaal. After all, it fired the first shots at a time when war was likely given Milner's jingoism, but not inevitable. Lord Salisbury, in London, was against war over gold or Uitlanders, as were most of his cabinet and much of the British public. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. I. Rotberg Harvard University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a welcome addition to the discussion of Britain's war in South Africa."--Jeffrey L. Meriwether, Albion "This book is among the more informative opening salvos of the centenary of the Anglo-Boer War."-- Choice "This collection of specialized essays...supplements general histories of the Boer War."--History: Reviews of New Books
"...a welcome addition to the discussion of Britain's war in South Africa."--Jeffrey L. Meriwether, Albion "This book is among the more informative opening salvos of the centenary of the Anglo-Boer War."--Choice "This collection of specialized essays...supplements general histories of the Boer War."--History: Reviews of New Books
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This collection of essays seeks for the first time to put the South African Boer War in its international context. Each essay examines the perspective of one country assessing the extent to which governments tried to capitalize on Britain's embarrassment and distraction and how their perceptions of British policy and the future of the British Empire were altered.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Origins of the Boer War
Britain and the Boer War
France and the Boer War
Russia and the Boer War
Germany and the Boer War
The Boer War and General von der Goltz
Austria-Hungary and the Boer War
Italy and the Boer War
Holland and the Boer War
Portugal and the Boer War
Delagoa Bay in the aftermath of the South African War
The USA and the Boer War
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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