Catalogue


A history of economic thought [electronic resource] : the LSE lectures /
Lionel Robbins ; edited by Steven G. Medema and Warren J. Samuels.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1998.
description
xxviii, 359 p. : ill.
ISBN
069101244X (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
More Details
added author
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1998.
isbn
069101244X (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Lectures given by Lionel Robbins at the London School of Economics during 1979-1980 and 1980-1981.
catalogue key
11361595
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [337]-354) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Anyone reading these lectures can, and surely will, admire their style, the range of material they cover, the dazzling intellectual brilliance, and the stimulation they provide."-- From the foreword by William J. Baumol, New York University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1998-10-01:
Robbins taught at the London School of Economics (LSE) from 1929 to 1961, directed the economic section of the British War Cabinet during World War II, and served as chair of the Financial Times from 1961 until 1970. In 1980, he began a series of 33 lectures at LSE in which he discussed the history of economic thought, from Plato and Aristotle to Alfred Marshall and John Maynard Keynes, and the intellectual and practical errors associated with its development. With a profound sense of humor and highly engaging anecdotes, this master teacher provided an unusual opportunity to discover not only the ideas but also the very different frames of reference that inspired the contributions of these great minds to our present understanding of economics. Essential reading for instructors, students, and practitioners alike, this is highly recommended for both academic and public libraries.ÄNorman B. Hutcherson, Beale Memorial Lib., Bakersfield, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1999-03-01:
For anyone who has taught a course in the history of economic thought or who has more than a passing interest in the field, this book will be a delight. The 33 lectures published here, recorded over two terms at the London School of Economics several years before the author's death in 1984, cover the academic terrain with the mastery of a scholar whose stature and years have made him a part of the history he recounts. Woven into the lectures are personal asides ranging from reminiscences about colleagues from the early part of the century to reflections on British university education and tips for collecting valuable works in the history of economic thought. The lectures also offer insights into Robbins's teaching methods. Even in his eighties Robbins made a point of rereading his original authors prior to each presentation. The lectures are laced with suggestions for further reading and critical comments about their value to the varied audience of advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The editors have been helpful in providing both the reading list for the lectures and complete citations for works mention by Robbins. Recommended for college and university collections. R. S. Hewett; Drake University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"As the 20th century draws to a close, the history of economic thought is beginning to look different, and the publication of Lionel Robbins's London School of Economics lectures on the subject will contribute to this process of rethinking. . . . A welcome relief from the ponderousness of many volumes on this subject."-- Virginia Quarterly Review
"Everything about this book breathes affection: Lionel Robbins's concern for his students down the decades, the editors sensitive treatment of their subject, and Professor William Baumol's modest justification for his foreward: 'I was there!'"-- Arthur Seldon, Times Literary Supplement
"For anyone who has taught a course in the history of economic thought or who has more than a passing interest in the field, this book will be a delight."-- Choice
"Robbins obviously loved the history of economic thought, but the passion that shows through on each page of this book is more than a passion for the history of economics. Robbins loved the discipline of economics itself, and the lectures reflect the gusto with which he had spent his life pursuing its mastery."-- Bradley W. Bateman, EH.NET
"The book . . . is filled with insights. . . . The editors, in order to retain to the fullest the inimitable flavor of Robbins' personality, have wisely not tidied up the text. . . . [They] deserve high praise for making these fine lectures available."-- Mises Review
"These lectures reflect Robbins two personae--the scholarly exponent of the centuries of economic thought and the passionate advocate of classical liberalism. A decisive part of his intellectual armoury was his often elegant, classical spoken English, which evoked a mixture of awe and wonder. In his LSE lectures, which he may have felt were his last epistles to posterity, the language is more informal, sometimes, colloquial, even unfamiliarly conversational."-- Arthur Seldon, Times Literary Supplement
"With a profound sense of humor and highly engaging anecdotes, this master teacher provided an unusual opportunity to discover not only the ideas but also the very different frames of reference that inspired the contributions of these great minds to our present understanding of economics. Essential reading."-- Library Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, October 1998
Choice, March 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Lionel Robbins's now famous lectures on the history of economic thought comprise one of the greatest accounts since World War II of the evolution of economic ideas. This volume represents the first time those lectures have been published. Lord Robbins (1898-1984) was a remarkably accomplished thinker, writer, and public figure. He made important contributions to economic theory, methodology, and policy analysis, directed the economic section of Winston Churchill's War Cabinet, and served as chairman of theFinancial Times. As a historian of economic ideas, he ranks with Joseph Schumpeter and Jacob Viner as one of the foremost scholars of the century. These lectures, delivered at the London School of Economics between 1979 and 1981 and tape-recorded by Robbins's grandson, display his mastery of the intellectual history of economics, his infectious enthusiasm for the subject, and his eloquence and incisive wit. They cover a broad chronological range, beginning with Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas, focusing extensively on Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus and the classicals, and finishing with a discussion of moderns and marginalists from Marx to Alfred Marshall. Robbins takes a varied and inclusive approach to intellectual history. As he says in his first lecture: "I shall go my own sweet way--sometimes talk about doctrine, sometimes talk about persons, sometimes talk about periods." The lectures are united by Robbins's conviction that it is impossible to understand adequately contemporary institutions and social sciences without understanding the ideas behind their development. Authoritative yet accessible, combining the immediacy of the spoken word with Robbins's exceptional talent for clear, well-organized exposition, this volume will be welcomed by anyone interested in the intellectual origins of the modern world.
Main Description
Lionel Robbins's now famous lectures on the history of economic thought comprise one of the greatest accounts since World War II of the evolution of economic ideas. This volume represents the first time those lectures have been published. Lord Robbins (1898-1984) was a remarkably accomplished thinker, writer, and public figure. He made important contributions to economic theory, methodology, and policy analysis, directed the economic section of Winston Churchill's War Cabinet, and served as chairman of the Financial Times . As a historian of economic ideas, he ranks with Joseph Schumpeter and Jacob Viner as one of the foremost scholars of the century. These lectures, delivered at the London School of Economics between 1979 and 1981 and tape-recorded by Robbins's grandson, display his mastery of the intellectual history of economics, his infectious enthusiasm for the subject, and his eloquence and incisive wit. They cover a broad chronological range, beginning with Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas, focusing extensively on Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus and the classicals, and finishing with a discussion of moderns and marginalists from Marx to Alfred Marshall. Robbins takes a varied and inclusive approach to intellectual history. As he says in his first lecture: "I shall go my own sweet way--sometimes talk about doctrine, sometimes talk about persons, sometimes talk about periods." The lectures are united by Robbins's conviction that it is impossible to understand adequately contemporary institutions and social sciences without understanding the ideas behind their development. Authoritative yet accessible, combining the immediacy of the spoken word with Robbins's exceptional talent for clear, well-organized exposition, this volume will be welcomed by anyone interested in the intellectual origins of the modern world.
Unpaid Annotation
Anyone reading these lectures can, and surely will, admire their style, the range of material they cover, the dazzling intellectual brilliance, and the stimulation they provide.DLFrom the foreword by William J. Baumol, New York University Lionel Robbins's now famous lectures on the history of economic thought comprise one of the greatest accounts since World War II of the evolution of economic ideas. This volume represents the first time those lectures have been published. Lord Robbins (1898DS1984) was a remarkably accomplished thinker, writer, and public figure. He made important contributions to economic theory, methodology, and policy analysis, directed the economic section of Winston Churchill's War Cabinet, and served as chairman of the Financial Times. As a historian of economic ideas, he ranks with Joseph Schumpeter and Jacob Viner as one of the foremost scholars of the century. These lectures, delivered at the London School of Economics between 1979 and 1981 and tape-recorded by Robbins's grandson, display his mastery of the intellectual history of economics, his infectious enthusiasm for the subject, and his eloquence and incisive wit. They cover a broad chronological range, beginning with Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas, focusing extensively on Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus and the classicals, and finishing with a discussion of moderns and marginalists from Marx to Alfred Marshall. Robbins takes a varied and inclusive approach to intellectual history. As he says in his first lecture: I shall go my own sweet wayDLsometimes talk about doctrine, sometimes talk about persons, sometimes talk about periods. The lectures are united by Robbins's conviction that it is impossible to understand adequately contemporary institutions and social sciences without understanding the ideas behind their development. Authoritative yet accessible, combining the immediacy of the spoken word with Robbins's exceptional talent for clear, well-organized exposition, this volume will be welcomed by anyone interested in the intellectual origins of the modern world.
Unpaid Annotation
Lionel Robbins's now famous lectures on the history of economic thought comprise one of the greatest accounts since World War II of the evolution of economic ideas. This volume represents the first time those lectures have been published.Lord Robbins (1898-1984) was a remarkably accomplished thinker, writer, and public figure. He made important contributions to economic theory, methodology, and policy analysis, directed the economic section of Winston Churchill's War Cabinet, and served as chairman of the "Financial Times. As a historian of economic ideas, he ranks with Joseph Schumpeter and Jacob Viner as one of the foremost scholars of the century. These lectures, delivered at the London School of Economics between 1979 and 1981 and tape-recorded by Robbins's grandson, display his mastery of the intellectual history of economics, his infectious enthusiasm for the subject, and his eloquence and incisive wit. They cover a broad chronological range, beginning with Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas, focusing extensively on Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus and the classicals, and finishing with a discussion of moderns and marginalists from Marx
Table of Contents
List of Figures
Foreword
Introduction
Anticipationsp. 3
Introduction - Platop. 5
Plato and Aristotlep. 16
Aquinas and the Scholasticsp. 26
Pamphleteers - Money (Oresme, Bodin, "W.S.")p. 35
Pamphleteers - Mercantilism (Malynes, Misselden, Mun)p. 46
Sir William Pettyp. 55
Child and Locke (Interest)p. 66
Emergence of Systemsp. 75
Cantillonp. 77
Cantillon (cont.) - Physiocracyp. 86
Physiocrats - Turgotp. 95
Locke and Hume on Property - Hume on Moneyp. 104
Hume on Interest and Trade - Precursors of Adam Smithp. 114
General Survey of Smith's Intentions - The Wealth of Nations: Analytical (I)p. 125
The Wealth of Nations: Analytical (II)p. 133
The Wealth of Nations: Analytical (III) - Policy (I)p. 143
The Wealth of Nations: Policy (II)p. 153
Nineteenth-Century Classicismp. 165
General Review - Malthus on Populationp. 167
Value and Distribution: Historical Origin - Analytical (I)p. 176
Value and Distribution: Analytical (II)p. 185
Value and Distribution: Analytical (III)p. 192
Overall Equilibriump. 201
International Tradep. 210
John Stuart Millp. 219
Other Mid-Nineteenth-Century Thoughtp. 229
Mill (cont.) - Saint-Simon and Marxp. 231
Marx (cont.) - List and the Historical Schoolp. 238
Beginnings of Modern Analysisp. 247
The Historical School (cont.) - Precursors of Change: Cournot, von Thunen, and Raep. 249
The Marginal Revolution (I): Jevonsp. 258
The Marginal Revolution (II): Jevons and Mengerp. 268
The Marginal Revolution (III): Costs (Wieser) - The Pricing of Factor Services (Wieser, Clark, Wicksteed)p. 277
Capital Theory: Bohm-Bawerk and Fisherp. 285
Walras - Paretop. 295
Marshallp. 303
Money: Fisher, Marshall, Wicksellp. 312
Robbins' Reading Listp. 321
Robbins' Writings in the History of Economic Thoughtp. 331
Referencesp. 337
Indexp. 355
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem