Catalogue


Ann Yearsley and Hannah More, patronage and poetry [electronic resource] : the story of a literary relationship /
by Kerri Andrews..
imprint
London ; Brookfield, VT : Pickering & Chatto, 2013.
description
x, 188 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1848931514 (acid-free paper), 9781848931510 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
London ; Brookfield, VT : Pickering & Chatto, 2013.
isbn
1848931514 (acid-free paper)
9781848931510 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Hannah More and David Garrick : patronage and friendship -- A middling-class poet-maker : Hannah More and Ann Yearsley -- Patronage, gratitude and friendship, 1785-90 -- "Such is Bristol's soul" : patronage and rivalry -- Novel writing and the French Revolution -- Romantic Bristol : creative networks in the 1790s.
catalogue key
11346525
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 175-181) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This is an important book, not only for the more detailed narrative it offers of this most turbulent of patronage relationships, but for the new understanding it brings of Yearsley's place in the Cottle circle in Bristol, and of the complexities of literary patronage during the period. The new manuscript materials that have surfaced in recent years (thanks not least to Andrews herself) are very well used, and Yearsley emerges as a more complex and sympathetic figure, whose radical views were sustained, not abandoned. Andrews's scholarly and highly readable study confirms Yearsley's significance as a writer and is bound to stimulate fresh interest in her work.'
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Summaries
Main Description
Hannah More and Ann Yearsley experienced a long-standing relationship that lasted far beyond their short-lived roles as patron and protégée. More had originally come to prominence as a playwright under the patronage of celebrated actor/manager David Garrick. When an established writer herself, she was able to assist Yearsley, bringing the young poet's rustic voice to the attention of an eighteenth-century society hungry for the fashionable phenomenon of the 'rural genius'.This study offers a timely and necessary reassessment of the careers of both Yearsley and More. Making use of newly-discovered letters and poems, Andrews provides a full analysis of the breakdown of the two writers' affiliation and compares it to other labouring-class relationships based on patronage. Their writings on Abolition are examined together in the context of their association with the port of Bristol and Yearsley and More's reputations at the time of their deaths - 1806 and 1833, respectively - are considered.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study offers an exploration of the careers of Ann Yearsley and Hannah More. Making use of newly-discovered letters and poems, Andrews provides a full analysis of the breakdown of the two writers' affiliation and compares it to other labouring-class relationships based on patronage.
Main Description
Hannah More and Ann Yearsley experienced a long-standing relationship that lasted far beyond their roles as patron and protégée. More had originally come to prominence as a playwright under the patronage of celebrated actor/manager David Garrick. When an established writer herself, she was able to assist Yearsley, bringing the young poet's rustic voice to the attention of an eighteenth-century society hungry for the fashionable phenomenon of the 'rural genius'.Andrews offers a timely and necessary reassessment of the careers of both Yearsley and More. Making use of newly-discovered letters and poems, she provides a full analysis of the breakdown of the two writers' affiliation and compares it to other labouring-class relationships based on patronage.
Main Description
Hannah More and Ann Yearsley experienced a long-standing relationship that lasted far beyond their short-lived roles as patron and prot g e. More had originally come to prominence as a playwright under the patronage of celebrated actor/manager David Garrick. When an established writer herself, she was able to assist Yearsley, bringing the young poet's rustic voice to the attention of an eighteenth-century society hungry for the fashionable phenomenon of the 'rural genius'.This study offers a timely and necessary reassessment of the careers of both Yearsley and More. Making use of newly-discovered letters and poems, Andrews provides a full analysis of the breakdown of the two writers' affiliation and compares it to other labouring-class relationships based on patronage. Their writings on Abolition are examined together in the context of their association with the port of Bristol and Yearsley and More's reputations at the time of their deaths - 1806 and 1833, respectively - are considered.
Description for Reader
Literature, Slavery and Abolition, Print Culture and Eighteenth-Century Studies
Description for Bookstore
Hannah More and Ann Yearsley experienced a long-standing relationship that lasted far beyond their roles as patron and protégée. More had originally come to prominence as a playwright under the patronage of celebrated actor/manager David Garrick. When an established writer herself, she was able to assist Yearsley, bringing the young poet’s rustic voice to the attention of an eighteenth-century society hungry for the fashionable phenomenon of the ‘rural genius’. Andrews offers a timely and necessary reassessment of the careers of both Yearsley and More. Making use of newly-discovered letters and poems, she provides a full analysis of the breakdown of the two writers’ affiliation and compares it to other labouring-class relationships based on patronage.
Main Description
Hannah More and Ann Yearsley experienced a long-standing relationship that lasted far beyond their short-lived roles as patron and prot_g_e. More had originally come to prominence as a playwright under the patronage of celebrated actor/manager David Garrick. When an established writer herself, she was able to assist Yearsley, bringing the young poet's rustic voice to the attention of an eighteenth-century society hungry for the fashionable phenomenon of the 'rural genius'.This study offers a timely and necessary reassessment of the careers of both Yearsley and More. Making use of newly-discovered letters and poems, Andrews provides a full analysis of the breakdown of the two writers' affiliation and compares it to other labouring-class relationships based on patronage. Their writings on Abolition are examined together in the context of their association with the port of Bristol and Yearsley and More's reputations at the time of their deaths - 1806 and 1833, respectively - are considered.

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