Catalogue


Women's health : body, mind, spirit : an integrated approach to wellness and illness /
Marian C. Condon.
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2004.
description
xxii, 602 p. : ill.
ISBN
0838596487, 9780838596487
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2004.
isbn
0838596487
9780838596487
catalogue key
11332070
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Marian C. Condon teaches in the Department of Nursing at York College, in York, Pennsylvania.
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
I put this book together for a very practical reason: I needed a textbook for a course on women's health, and I could not find one with all the features I wanted. For example, because the course is open to both healthcare majors and nonhealth majors, I wanted a text that would be engaging and worthwhile forbothsets of students and for the general public as well. I knew that many traditional and older college students had little knowledge of how to go about evaluating, preserving, and/or improving their health and that even women majoring in nursing, or another health-related discipline sometimes know more about taking care of other people than about caring for themselves. Therefore, I wanted a text that would spell out what it means to bewell--for example, to have a healthy cardiovascular system, lungs, and kidneys. Thus,Markers of Wellnesssections in this book came into being, and, of course, my desire for a book that would help readers foster their own wellness led to the promoting wellness sections. It was obviously also necessary that the nature of the various illnesses that women commonly experience, and the signs and symptoms that betray their presence, be described. For those purposes, I devised the sections on illnesses and problems. Because I have aholisticphilosophy of health, however, I also wanted a book that would address more than just physical health. I wanted one that would convey the interrelated and interdependent nature ofphysical, mental,andspiritualhealth and would provide information on evaluating and improving health status in all three of those areas. Another wish was for a book that would address theintegratedhealthcare delivery system that is emerging in this country. I knew that readers would need information that would help them choose wisely from among the wide range of availabletraditionalandnontraditionalhealthcare-related products and providers. Last, but perhaps most important, I wanted a book that would acknowledge the often ignored link betweenwomen's healthand theirstatus and rolesin the society in which they live and would address the ways in whichsocioeconomic variables,such as age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability and sexual orientation, affect women's health. Women's Health: Body, Mind, Spirit--An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illnessmeets all the aforementioned criteria. First, it is suitable for both healthcare majors and persons without a formal background in healthcare. It is worthwhile reading for students majoring in nursing and other healthcare professions, as it addresses topics and details pertinent to women's health that, due to space limitations, arenot includedin more general texts. In all discussions of illness diagnosis and treatment,areas of disparity between men's and women's experience(symptoms, accuracy of diagnostic indicators, treatment efficacy, and so on) are highlighted. Lay readers will appreciate thedefinitionsthat accompany all medical terms used, as well as the clearexplanationsof physiological processes, medical interventions, and the like. Thewellness self-assessmentssections found in most chapters are designed to assist readers in evaluating their own health status. Theresources,including books, journals, videotapes, websites, and organizations, listed at the end of each chapter will be of general interest, as well the information in the New Directions sections on trends in research, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The information in the New Directions sections also remind readers of the fluid and ephemeral nature of "knowledge" and the need for lifelong inquiry and critical thinking. No book intended to assist people in managing their health is complete without a section onaccessing and interacting withour rapidly evolving healthcare delivery system. Readers need
Introduction or Preface
I put this book together for a very practical reason: I needed a textbook for a course on women''s health, and I could not find one with all the features I wanted. For example, because the course is open to both healthcare majors and nonhealth majors, I wanted a text that would be engaging and worthwhile for both sets of students and for the general public as well. I knew that many traditional and older college students had little knowledge of how to go about evaluating, preserving, and/or improving their health and that even women majoring in nursing, or another health-related discipline sometimes know more about taking care of other people than about caring for themselves. Therefore, I wanted a text that would spell out what it means to be well --for example, to have a healthy cardiovascular system, lungs, and kidneys. Thus, Markers of Wellness sections in this book came into being, and, of course, my desire for a book that would help readers foster their own wellness led to the promoting wellness sections. It was obviously also necessary that the nature of the various illnesses that women commonly experience, and the signs and symptoms that betray their presence, be described. For those purposes, I devised the sections on illnesses and problems. Because I have a holistic philosophy of health, however, I also wanted a book that would address more than just physical health. I wanted one that would convey the interrelated and interdependent nature of physical, mental, and spiritual health and would provide information on evaluating and improving health status in all three of those areas. Another wish was for a book that would address the integrated healthcare delivery system that is emerging in this country. I knew that readers would need information that would help them choose wisely from among the wide range of available traditional and nontraditional healthcare-related products and providers. Last, but perhaps most important, I wanted a book that would acknowledge the often ignored link between women''s health and their status and roles in the society in which they live and would address the ways in which socioeconomic variables, such as age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability and sexual orientation, affect women''s health. Women''s Health: Body, Mind, Spirit --An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illness meets all the aforementioned criteria. First, it is suitable for both healthcare majors and persons without a formal background in healthcare. It is worthwhile reading for students majoring in nursing and other healthcare professions, as it addresses topics and details pertinent to women''s health that, due to space limitations, are not included in more general texts. In all discussions of illness diagnosis and treatment, areas of disparity between men''s and women''s experience (symptoms, accuracy of diagnostic indicators, treatment efficacy, and so on) are highlighted. Lay readers will appreciate the definitions that accompany all medical terms used, as well as the clear explanations of physiological processes, medical interventions, and the like. The wellness self-assessments sections found in most chapters are designed to assist readers in evaluating their own health status. The resources, including books, journals, videotapes, websites, and organizations, listed at the end of each chapter will be of general interest, as well the information in the New Directions sections on trends in research, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The information in the New Directions sections also remind readers of the fluid and ephemeral nature of "knowledge" and the need for lifelong inquiry and critical thinking. No book intended to assist people in managing their health is complete without a section on accessing and interacting with our rapidly evolving healthcare delivery system. Readers need information about providers and systems, as well as on their own roles as consumers, to be able to get good care with which they are satisfied. Readers will appreciate the information pertaining to dealing with managed care (such as HMOs and PPOs) and the importance of advance directives (such as living wills and medical powers of attorney) included in Chapter 9, as well as the guidelines for communicating effectively with providers and seeking and evaluating sources of health-related information. Women''s Health: Body, Mind, Spirit--An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illness meets my need for a holistic text in that it acknowledges and explains the interconnectedness among the physical, mental/emotional, and spiritual aspects of our being, and therefore our health. In it, health is defined as a continuum ranging from wellness to illness, and it is conceptualized as multidimensional: physical (organ systems), psychological (thought patterns, attitudes, feelings, and moods), and spiritual (the process of creating meaning in one''s life through a sense of connection to something that transcends the self). The book makes the point that each dimension of health influences, and is influenced by, the others. For example, Chapter 27 contains a section on psychoneuroimmunology, a relatively new science that investigates the connections between mental/emotional states and physical manifestations of health and illness. Also, psychological, emotional, and spiritual factors known to play a role in physical illnesses are highlighted. For example, considerable attention is paid to hostility as a potential factor in the development of coronary artery disease. In Chapter 28, concrete information on dealing optimally with the physical, psychological, and spiritual aspects of dying and death is presented. Addressing psychological wellness and spiritual wellness in their own right is also important. For one thing, there is evidence that both can be actively promoted, just as physical wellness can. Also, some of the markers of psychological wellness may be different in women and men. For example, it has been suggested that women are happiest when embedded in a web of relationships, whereas men seem to do well without this. Including information about spiritual wellness for women is important, because research suggests that persons who have developed the spiritual dimension of their being enjoy a higher level of physical and emotional health than persons who do not, Although most women describe themselves as having religious or spiritual faith, the patriarchal nature of the major religions is problematic for many. Therefore, resources related to both the growing movement to make mainstream religions more woman-friendly and alternative women-centered spiritual practices are provided. Women''s Health: Body, Mind, Spirit--An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illness meets my need for an integrated text in that it addresses not only traditional healthcare but also what has been seen as alternative, or complementary, health care. The inclusion of material on nontraditional healthcare is important, because it has been estimated that the general public spends more money on alternative therapies than on mainstream remedies and services. Readers must have information on the nature, efficacy, and safety of the most commonly used alternative therapies in order to make intelligent choices as healthcare consumers. Chapter 10 addresses what is referred to as the holistic paradigm, the set of beliefs and values that distinguishes alternative healthcare systems from traditional Western healthcare. In Chapter 11, alternative systems, such as traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, homeopathy, and naturopathy, and treatment modalities, such as acupuncture, h
Introduction or Preface
I put this book together for a very practical reason: I needed a textbook for a course on women''s health, and I could not find one with all the features I wanted. For example, because the course is open to both healthcare majors and nonhealth majors, I wanted a text that would be engaging and worthwhile for both sets of students and for the general public as well. I knew that many traditional and older college students had little knowledge of how to go about evaluating, preserving, and/or improving their health and that even women majoring in nursing, or another health-related discipline sometimes know more about taking care of other people than about caring for themselves. Therefore, I wanted a text that would spell out what it means to be well --for example, to have a healthy cardiovascular system, lungs, and kidneys. Thus, Markers of Wellness sections in this book came into being, and, of course, my desire for a book that would help readers foster their own wellness led to the promoting wellness sections. It was obviously also necessary that the nature of the various illnesses that women commonly experience, and the signs and symptoms that betray their presence, be described. For those purposes, I devised the sections on illnesses and problems. Because I have a holistic philosophy of health, however, I also wanted a book that would address more than just physical health. I wanted one that would convey the interrelated and interdependent nature of physical, mental, and spiritual health and would provide information on evaluating and improving health status in all three of those areas. Another wish was for a book that would address the integrated healthcare delivery system that is emerging in this country. I knew that readers would need information that would help them choose wisely from among the wide range of available traditional and nontraditional healthcare-related products and providers. Last, but perhaps most important, I wanted a book that would acknowledge the often ignored link between women''s health and their status and roles in the society in which they live and would address the ways in which socioeconomic variables, such as age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability and sexual orientation, affect women''s health. Women''s Health: Body, Mind, Spirit --An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illness meets all the aforementioned criteria. First, it is suitable for both healthcare majors and persons without a formal background in healthcare. It is worthwhile reading for students majoring in nursing and other healthcare professions, as it addresses topics and details pertinent to women''s health that, due to space limitations, are not included in more general texts. In all discussions of illness diagnosis and treatment, areas of disparity between men''s and women''s experience (symptoms, accuracy of diagnostic indicators, treatment efficacy, and so on) are highlighted. Lay readers will appreciate the definitions that accompany all medical terms used, as well as the clear explanations of physiological processes, medical interventions, and the like. The wellness self-assessments sections found in most chapters are designed to assist readers in evaluating their own health status. The resources, including books, journals, videotapes, websites, and organizations, listed at the end of each chapter will be of general interest, as well the information in the New Directions sections on trends in research, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The information in the New Directions sections also remind readers of the fluid and ephemeral nature of "knowledge" and the need for lifelong inquiry and critical thinking. No book intended to assist people in managing their health is complete without a section on accessing and interacting with our rapidly evolving healthcare delivery system. Readers need information about providers and systems, as well as on their own roles as consumers, to be able to get good care with which they are satisfied. Readers will appreciate the information pertaining to dealing with managed care (such as HMOs and PPOs) and the importance of advance directives (such as living wills and medical powers of attorney) included in Chapter 9, as well as the guidelines for communicating effectively with providers and seeking and evaluating sources of health-related information. Women''s Health: Body, Mind, Spirit--An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illness meets my need for a holistic text in that it acknowledges and explains the interconnectedness among the physical, mental/emotional, and spiritual aspects of our being, and therefore our health. In it, health is defined as a continuum ranging from wellness to illness, and it is conceptualized as multidimensional: physical (organ systems), psychological (thought patterns, attitudes, feelings, and moods), and spiritual (the process of creating meaning in one''s life through a sense of connection to something that transcends the self). The book makes the point that each dimension of health influences, and is influenced by, the others. For example, Chapter 27 contains a section on psychoneuroimmunology, a relatively new science that investigates the connections between mental/emotional states and physical manifestations of health and illness. Also, psychological, emotional, and spiritual factors known to play a role in physical illnesses are highlighted. For example, considerable attention is paid to hostility as a potential factor in the development of coronary artery disease. In Chapter 28, concrete information on dealing optimally with the physical, psychological, and spiritual aspects of dying and death is presented. Addressing psychological wellness and spiritual wellness in their own right is also important. For one thing, there is evidence that both can be actively promoted, just as physical wellness can. Also, some of the markers of psychological wellness may be different in women and men. For example, it has been suggested that women are happiest when embedded in a web of relationships, whereas men seem to do well without this. Including information about spiritual wellness for women is important, because research suggests that persons who have developed the spiritual dimension of their being enjoy a higher level of physical and emotional health than persons who do not, Although most women describe themselves as having religious or spiritual faith, the patriarchal nature of the major religions is problematic for many. Therefore, resources related to both the growing movement to make mainstream religions more woman-friendly and alternative women-centered spiritual practices are provided. Women''s Health: Body, Mind, Spirit--An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illness meets my need for an integrated text in that it addresses not only traditional healthcare but also what has been seen as alternative, or complementary, health care. The inclusion of material on nontraditional healthcare is important, because it has been estimated that the general public spends more money on alternative therapies than on mainstream remedies and services. Readers must have information on the nature, efficacy, and safety of the most commonly used alternative therapies in order to make intelligent choices as healthcare consumers. Chapter 10 addresses what is referred to as the holistic paradigm, the set of beliefs and values that distinguishes alternative healthcare systems from traditional Western healthcare. In Chapter 11, alternative systems, such as traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, homeopathy, and naturopathy, and treatment modalities, such as acupuncture, healing touch, aromatherapy, and herbs, are discussed in terms of the beliefs about health and healthcare that underlie them and their demonstrated efficacy or lack of it. All chapters with an illness section contain information about alternative treatments that are commonly used for the malady under discussion. For example, Chapter 12 addresses not only the American Heart Association''s dietary recommendations but also those of Dean Ornish (author of Dr. Dean Ornish''s Program for Reversing Heart Disease ). The section on treatment options for depression contains information about the herb St. John''s wort, as well as standard drugs, such as Prozac. A brief synopsis of the research literature on all newer treatment options is included. No book on women''s health is complete without a discussion of the implications of the female gender for healthcare. The content in this area addresses historical and contemporary cultural beliefs and attitudes toward women, as well as women''s relationships with the healthcare establishment. It has been well documented that decisions in such areas as medical research, insurance reimbursement policies, and diagnostic and treatment protocols are influenced by societal views of women. Readers must have sufficient information about the past to think critically about the present. The ways in which socioeconomic variables such as age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability and sexual orientation affect women''s health are addressed primarily in Chapter 2, as well as alluded to in other chapters. It is my hope that the existence of this book will stimulate faculty in departments of nursing and other healthcare disciplines to offer courses on women''s health that are open to students from all majors. Educators in health-related disciplines have an obligation to support the health of the student body at large, and to establish themselves as expert sources of information about health and health
First Chapter

I put this book together for a very practical reason: I needed a textbook for a course on women's health, and I could not find one with all the features I wanted. For example, because the course is open to both healthcare majors and nonhealth majors, I wanted a text that would be engaging and worthwhile for both sets of students and for the general public as well. I knew that many traditional and older college students had little knowledge of how to go about evaluating, preserving, and/or improving their health and that even women majoring in nursing, or another health-related discipline sometimes know more about taking care of other people than about caring for themselves. Therefore, I wanted a text that would spell out what it means to be well—for example, to have a healthy cardiovascular system, lungs, and kidneys. Thus, Markers of Wellness sections in this book came into being, and, of course, my desire for a book that would help readers foster their own wellness led to the promoting wellness sections. It was obviously also necessary that the nature of the various illnesses that women commonly experience, and the signs and symptoms that betray their presence, be described. For those purposes, I devised the sections on illnesses and problems. Because I have a holistic philosophy of health, however, I also wanted a book that would address more than just physical health. I wanted one that would convey the interrelated and interdependent nature of physical, mental, and spiritual health and would provide information on evaluating and improving health status in all three of those areas. Another wish was for a book that would address the integrated healthcare delivery system that is emerging in this country. I knew that readers would need information that would help them choose wisely from among the wide range of available traditional and nontraditional healthcare-related products and providers. Last, but perhaps most important, I wanted a book that would acknowledge the often ignored link between women's health and their status and roles in the society in which they live and would address the ways in which socioeconomic variables, such as age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability and sexual orientation, affect women's health.

Women's Health: Body, Mind, Spirit—An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illness meets all the aforementioned criteria. First, it is suitable for both healthcare majors and persons without a formal background in healthcare. It is worthwhile reading for students majoring in nursing and other healthcare professions, as it addresses topics and details pertinent to women's health that, due to space limitations, are not included in more general texts. In all discussions of illness diagnosis and treatment, areas of disparity between men's and women's experience (symptoms, accuracy of diagnostic indicators, treatment efficacy, and so on) are highlighted. Lay readers will appreciate the definitions that accompany all medical terms used, as well as the clear explanations of physiological processes, medical interventions, and the like. The wellness self-assessments sections found in most chapters are designed to assist readers in evaluating their own health status. The resources, including books, journals, videotapes, websites, and organizations, listed at the end of each chapter will be of general interest, as well the information in the New Directions sections on trends in research, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The information in the New Directions sections also remind readers of the fluid and ephemeral nature of "knowledge" and the need for lifelong inquiry and critical thinking.

No book intended to assist people in managing their health is complete without a section on accessing and interacting with our rapidly evolving healthcare delivery system. Readers need information about providers and systems, as well as on their own roles as consumers, to be able to get good care with which they are satisfied. Readers will appreciate the information pertaining to dealing with managed care (such as HMOs and PPOs) and the importance of advance directives (such as living wills and medical powers of attorney) included in Chapter 9, as well as the guidelines for communicating effectively with providers and seeking and evaluating sources of health-related information.

Women's Health: Body, Mind, Spirit—An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illness meets my need for a holistic text in that it acknowledges and explains the interconnectedness among the physical, mental/emotional, and spiritual aspects of our being, and therefore our health. In it, health is defined as a continuum ranging from wellness to illness, and it is conceptualized as multidimensional: physical (organ systems), psychological (thought patterns, attitudes, feelings, and moods), and spiritual (the process of creating meaning in one's life through a sense of connection to something that transcends the self). The book makes the point that each dimension of health influences, and is influenced by, the others. For example, Chapter 27 contains a section on psychoneuroimmunology, a relatively new science that investigates the connections between mental/emotional states and physical manifestations of health and illness. Also, psychological, emotional, and spiritual factors known to play a role in physical illnesses are highlighted. For example, considerable attention is paid to hostility as a potential factor in the development of coronary artery disease. In Chapter 28, concrete information on dealing optimally with the physical, psychological, and spiritual aspects of dying and death is presented.

Addressing psychological wellness and spiritual wellness in their own right is also important. For one thing, there is evidence that both can be actively promoted, just as physical wellness can. Also, some of the markers of psychological wellness may be different in women and men. For example, it has been suggested that women are happiest when embedded in a web of relationships, whereas men seem to do well without this. Including information about spiritual wellness for women is important, because research suggests that persons who have developed the spiritual dimension of their being enjoy a higher level of physical and emotional health than persons who do not, Although most women describe themselves as having religious or spiritual faith, the patriarchal nature of the major religions is problematic for many. Therefore, resources related to both the growing movement to make mainstream religions more woman-friendly and alternative women-centered spiritual practices are provided.

Women's Health: Body, Mind, Spirit—An Integrated Approach to Wellness and Illness meets my need for an integrated text in that it addresses not only traditional healthcare but also what has been seen as alternative, or complementary, health care. The inclusion of material on nontraditional healthcare is important, because it has been estimated that the general public spends more money on alternative therapies than on mainstream remedies and services. Readers must have information on the nature, efficacy, and safety of the most commonly used alternative therapies in order to make intelligent choices as healthcare consumers. Chapter 10 addresses what is referred to as the holistic paradigm, the set of beliefs and values that distinguishes alternative healthcare systems from traditional Western healthcare. In Chapter 11, alternative systems, such as traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, homeopathy, and naturopathy, and treatment modalities, such as acupuncture, healing touch, aromatherapy, and herbs, are discussed in terms of the beliefs about health and healthcare that underlie them and their demonstrated efficacy or lack of it. All chapters with an illness section contain information about alternative treatments that are commonly used for the malady under discussion. For example, Chapter 12 addresses not only the American Heart Association's dietary recommendations but also those of Dean Ornish (author of Dr. Dean Ornish's Program for Reversing Heart Disease). The section on treatment options for depression contains information about the herb St. John's wort, as well as standard drugs, such as Prozac. A brief synopsis of the research literature on all newer treatment options is included.

No book on women's health is complete without a discussion of the implications of the female gender for healthcare. The content in this area addresses historical and contemporary cultural beliefs and attitudes toward women, as well as women's relationships with the healthcare establishment. It has been well documented that decisions in such areas as medical research, insurance reimbursement policies, and diagnostic and treatment protocols are influenced by societal views of women. Readers must have sufficient information about the past to think critically about the present. The ways in which socioeconomic variables such as age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability and sexual orientation affect women's health are addressed primarily in Chapter 2, as well as alluded to in other chapters.

It is my hope that the existence of this book will stimulate faculty in departments of nursing and other healthcare disciplines to offer courses on women's health that are open to students from all majors. Educators in health-related disciplines have an obligation to support the health of the student body at large, and to establish themselves as expert sources of information about health and healthcare.

Finally, it is my hope that you, the reader, will consider this book to have been worth your investment in time and money. I hope Women's Health: Body, Mind, Spirit—An Integrated Approach to Wellness anal Illness will stimulate you to maximize your wellness and will equip you to cope better with illness. I hope that, after having read it, you will be more aware of the ways in which the physical, psychological, and spiritual aspects of your being interact to affect your overall health. I hope also that you are dazzled by what you learn about the wonders of your body and the strength, stamina, resiliency, and tenacity of your female kind. Finally, I wish you health and happiness in body, mind, and spirit.

Marian C. Condon

Summaries
Back Cover Copy
A "must have," this user-friendly resource provides all of the essentials of women's health: how to promote it, the societal factors that so greatly impact it, and how to choose wisely among the wide range of health care modalities available. Addressing the physical, mental, and spiritual aspects of health, it offers concrete guidelines for promoting wellness and recognizing illness. Included are discussions of societal factors that influence health and healthcare, as well as controversial issues such as the necessity of surgical interventions. A critique of both traditional and commonly used alternative therapies and remedies provides a complete picture of the health care options available today.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Written for undergraduate courses, this text provides students with essential information on women's health: how to promote it, the societal factors that so greatly impact it & how to choose wisely among the wide-range of health care modalities available.
Long Description
For undergraduate and graduate courses in Women's Health appropriate for nursing and non-health majors. User-friendly and self explanatory, this text provides students with essential information about women's health: how to promote it, the societal factors that so greatly influence it, and how to choose wisely among the wide-range of health care modalities available. Its versatile yet comprehensive coverage addresses the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of health, and offers concrete guidelines for promoting wellness and recognizing both wellness and illness.
Main Description
User-friendly and self explanatory, this book provides readers with essential information about women's health: how to promote it, the societal factors that so greatly impact it, and how to choose wisely among the wide-range of health care modalities available. Its versatile yet comprehensive coverage addresses the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of health, and offers concrete guidelines for promoting wellness and recognizing illness. Chapter topics include nutrition, substance abuse, environmental toxins, rest and exercise, stress, relationships, thyroid disease, sexual wellness and illness, pregnancy and childbearing, menopause and peri-menopause, violence against women, and much more. For individuals thinking of the nursing profession as a career, and women's health concerns as a priority. Previously announced in the 12/01 catalog.
Main Description
User-friendly and self explanatory, this book provides readers with essential information about women's health: how to promote it, the societal factors that so greatly impact it, and how to choose wisely among the wide-range of health care modalities available. Its versatile yet comprehensive coverage addresses the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of health, and offers concrete guidelines for promoting wellness and recognizing illness.Chapter topics include nutrition, substance abuse, environmental toxins, rest and exercise, stress, relationships, thyroid disease, sexual wellness and illness, pregnancy and childbearing, menopause and peri-menopause, violence against women, and much more.For individuals thinking of the nursing profession as a career, and women's health concerns as a priority.Previously announced in the 12/01 catalog.
Main Description
User-friendly and self explanatory, this resource provides students with essential information about womens health: how to promote it, the societal factors that so greatly impact it, and how to choose wisely among the wide-range of health care modalities available. Its versatile yet comprehensive coverage addresses the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of health, and offers concrete guidelines for promoting wellness and recognizing illness.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xvi
Prefacep. xvii
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
Contributorsp. xx
Reviewersp. xxii
Health and Healthcare: Implications of Female Gender, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Statusp. 1
Women, Society, Health, and Healthcare: Historical Roots and Contemporary Perspectivesp. 2
Chapter Outlinep. 2
Objectivesp. 2
Introductionp. 3
Revisiting the Past to Better Understand the Present: Historical Beliefs About and Attitudes Toward Womenp. 3
How Wrong They Were: Modern Insights into Women's Naturep. 10
Patriarchy: Natural and Inevitable?p. 14
The Social Construction of Healthp. 15
Women Working for Changep. 16
Ghosts of the Past That Continue to Haunt Womenp. 19
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 19
Referencesp. 19
Class, Ethnicity, Age, Physical Status, and Sexual Orientation: Implications for Health and Healthcarep. 21
Chapter Outlinep. 21
Objectivesp. 21
Introductionp. 22
Socioeconomic Statusp. 22
Ethnicityp. 22
Agep. 29
Women with Physical Disabilities and Chronic Diseasesp. 33
Lesbian Womenp. 34
New Directionsp. 36
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 36
Resourcesp. 37
Referencesp. 37
Environmental/Lifestyle Factors That Affect Healthp. 41
Nutritionp. 42
Chapter Outlinep. 42
Objectivesp. 42
Introductionp. 43
Dietary Patterns in Americap. 43
The Basics of Sound Nutritionp. 43
Two Essential Noncaloric Nutrients: Fiber and Waterp. 50
Antioxidantsp. 51
Making Sound Nutritional Decisionsp. 52
Nutritional Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 72
New Directionsp. 73
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 74
Resourcesp. 74
Referencesp. 76
Substance Abuse and Dependencep. 79
Chapter Outlinep. 79
Objectivesp. 79
Introductionp. 80
Backgroundp. 80
Definition of Termsp. 80
Theories of Causationp. 80
Epidemiologyp. 82
Substance Use During Pregnancyp. 83
Risk Factors for Substance Abuse and Dependencep. 85
Classification of Substances of Abusep. 86
The Unique Psychosocial Impact of Substance Abuse/Dependence on Womenp. 87
Role of Physiological, Sex-Based Differences in Substance Abuse/Dependencep. 88
Treatmentp. 89
Barriers to Treatment and Hope for Recoveryp. 92
Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 93
New Directionsp. 93
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 93
Resourcesp. 93
Referencesp. 94
Environmental Toxinsp. 97
Chapter Outlinep. 97
Objectivesp. 97
Introductionp. 97
Evaluation of Environmental Toxinsp. 98
Environmental Toxins of Special Concern to Womenp. 102
Keeping It in Perspectivep. 107
New Directionsp. 108
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 108
Resourcesp. 108
Referencesp. 109
Rest and Exercisep. 113
Chapter Outlinep. 113
Objectivesp. 113
Introductionp. 113
Restp. 114
Exercisep. 117
Rest and Exercise Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 128
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 128
Resourcesp. 128
Referencesp. 128
Women and Stressp. 130
Chapter Outlinep. 130
Objectivesp. 130
Introductionp. 130
Stress and Copingp. 131
Stressors at Home and at Workp. 133
Strategies for Relieving Stress and Promoting Well-Beingp. 136
Long-Term Planningp. 139
Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 140
New Directionsp. 141
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 142
Resourcesp. 142
Referencesp. 142
Relationshipsp. 145
Chapter Outlinep. 145
Objectivesp. 145
Introductionp. 145
Women and Relationshipsp. 146
Markers of Healthy Relationshipsp. 150
Common Limiting Factors in Relationshipsp. 152
Strategies for Maintaining Healthy Relationshipsp. 153
Learning from Broken Relationshipsp. 157
Relational Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 159
New Directionsp. 160
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 160
Resourcesp. 160
Referencesp. 160
The Emerging Healthcare Delivery Systemp. 163
Traditional Healthcarep. 164
Chapter Outlinep. 164
Objectivesp. 164
Introductionp. 164
Knowing the Systemp. 165
Patients' Legal Rightsp. 175
New Directionsp. 179
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 180
Resourcesp. 180
Referencesp. 180
Nontraditional Healthcare: Emerging into Integrative Healthcarep. 182
Chapter Outlinep. 182
Objectivesp. 182
Introductionp. 183
Definition and Clarification of Termsp. 183
The Emergence of Holistic Healthcarep. 183
Foundational Concepts of the Holistic Healthcare Paradigmp. 186
Women and Integrative Healthcarep. 190
Research Methodologies and Intergative Healthcarep. 191
New Directionsp. 192
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 192
Resourcesp. 193
Referencesp. 193
Holistic Health: Complementary Therapeutic Disciplines and Remediesp. 195
Chapter Outlinep. 195
Objectivesp. 196
Introductionp. 196
Diet, Nutrition, and Lifestyle Choicesp. 196
Modalities That Promote Relaxation and Enhance Self-Regulation and Insightp. 197
Transpersonal Therapiesp. 200
Bodyways: Body-Based Therapiesp. 201
Ethnomedical Systemsp. 202
Other Healing Disciplinesp. 204
Herbal Remediesp. 205
New Directionsp. 217
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 218
Resourcesp. 218
Referencesp. 221
Physical Healthp. 227
Cardiovascular Wellness and Illnessp. 228
Chapter Outlinep. 228
Objectivesp. 228
Introductionp. 229
Markers of Cardiovascular Wellnessp. 229
Promoting Cardiovascular Wellnessp. 232
Cardiovascular Illnessesp. 241
Cardiovascular Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 252
New Directionsp. 252
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 252
Resourcesp. 253
Referencesp. 253
Respiratory Wellness and Illnessp. 256
Chapter Outlinep. 256
Objectivesp. 257
Introductionp. 257
Markers of Respiratory Wellnessp. 257
Promoting Respiratory Wellnessp. 262
Respiratory Illnessesp. 266
Respiratory Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 272
New Directionsp. 272
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 272
Resourcesp. 272
Referencesp. 273
Musculoskeletal Wellness and Illnessp. 274
Chapter Outlinep. 274
Objectivesp. 274
Introductionp. 274
Markers of Musculoskeletal Wellnessp. 275
Promoting Musculoskeletal Wellnessp. 276
Musculoskeletal Problems and Diseasesp. 279
Musculoskeletal Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 288
New Directionsp. 288
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 289
Resourcesp. 289
Referencesp. 289
Gastrointestinal Wellness and Illnessp. 291
Chapter Outlinep. 291
Objectivesp. 291
Introductionp. 291
Markers of Gastrointestinal Wellnessp. 292
Promoting Gastrointestinal Wellnessp. 293
Gastrointestinal Illnesses and Problemsp. 294
Gastrointestinal Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 300
New Directionsp. 300
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 301
Resourcesp. 301
Referencesp. 301
Urinary Tract Wellness and Illnessp. 303
Chapter Outlinep. 303
Objectivesp. 303
Introductionp. 303
Markers of Urinary Tract Wellnessp. 303
Promoting Urinary Tract Wellnessp. 305
Urinary Tract Illnesses and Problemsp. 307
Urinary Tract Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 316
New Directionsp. 316
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 316
Resourcesp. 317
Referencesp. 317
Gynecological Wellness and Illnessp. 319
Chapter Outlinep. 319
Objectivesp. 320
Introductionp. 320
Markers of Gynecological Wellnessp. 320
Promoting Gynecological Wellnessp. 323
Gynecological Illnesses and Problemsp. 334
The Challenge of Cancerp. 357
Gynecological Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 358
New Directionsp. 359
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 359
Resourcesp. 359
Referencesp. 360
Skin Wellness and Illnessp. 365
Chapter Outlinep. 365
Objectivesp. 365
Introductionp. 365
Markers of Skin Wellness: Skin Color and Texturep. 365
Promoting Skin Wellnessp. 366
Diseases and Problems of the Skinp. 370
Skin Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 383
New Directionsp. 383
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 384
Resourcesp. 384
Referencesp. 384
Neurological Wellness and Illnessp. 387
Chapter Outlinep. 387
Objectivesp. 387
Introductionp. 387
Markers of Neurological Wellnessp. 388
Promoting Neurological Wellnessp. 388
Neurological Illnesses and Problemsp. 389
New Directionsp. 402
Neurological Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 403
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 403
Resourcesp. 403
Referencesp. 403
Immunological Wellness and Illnessp. 405
Chapter Outlinep. 405
Objectivesp. 405
Introductionp. 406
Markers of Immunological Wellnessp. 406
Promoting Immunological Wellnessp. 410
Immunological Illnessesp. 414
Immunological Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 431
New Directionsp. 431
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 432
Resourcesp. 432
Referencesp. 432
Thyroid Wellness and Illnessp. 437
Chapter Outlinep. 437
Objectivesp. 437
Introductionp. 437
Markers of Thyroid Wellnessp. 438
Promoting Thyroid Wellnessp. 438
Thyroid Illnesses and Problemsp. 439
Thyroid Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 442
New Directionsp. 442
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 443
Resourcesp. 443
Referencesp. 443
Sexual Wellness and Illnessp. 445
Chapter Outlinep. 445
Objectivesp. 445
Introductionp. 446
Markers of Sexual Wellnessp. 446
Promoting Sexual Wellnessp. 449
Women's Sexual Illnesses and Problemsp. 451
Sexual Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 459
New Directionsp. 459
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 460
Resourcesp. 460
Referencesp. 460
Pregnancy and Childbearingp. 463
Chapter Outlinep. 463
Objectivesp. 464
Introductionp. 464
Choosing a Healthcare Providerp. 464
Preparation for Conceptionp. 465
Conceptionp. 467
Pregnancyp. 468
Labor and Deliveryp. 483
The Postrartum Periodp. 492
Unplanned Pregnancyp. 495
New Directionsp. 497
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 497
Resourcesp. 497
Referencesp. 498
Menopausep. 500
Chapter Outlinep. 500
Objectivesp. 500
Introductionp. 500
Terminologyp. 501
Menopause: A Natural Process or a Deficiency Disease?p. 502
Hormone Production in the Bodyp. 503
Physical and Other Changes Associated with Perimenopausep. 504
Physical Changes Associated with Menopausep. 504
Hormone Level Testingp. 507
Therapies for Problems Associated with Perimenopause and Menopausep. 507
Promoting Wellness During and After Menopausep. 512
New Directionsp. 513
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 513
Resourcesp. 513
Referencesp. 513
Violencep. 516
Chapter Outlinep. 516
Objectivesp. 516
Introductionp. 517
Intimate Violencep. 517
Sexual Assaultp. 523
New Directionsp. 530
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 531
Resourcesp. 531
Referencesp. 531
Emotional and Spiritual Healthp. 537
Psychological/Emotional Wellness and Illnessp. 538
Chapter Outlinep. 538
Objectivesp. 538
Introductionp. 538
Markers of Psychological/Emotional Wellnessp. 539
Promoting Psychological/Emotional Wellnessp. 540
Psychological/Emotional Illnesses and Problemsp. 540
Psychological/Emotional Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 557
New Directionsp. 557
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 557
Resourcesp. 557
Referencesp. 558
Spiritual Wellness and Illnessp. 562
Chapter Outlinep. 562
Objectivesp. 562
Introductionp. 562
Spirituality as Religious Orientationp. 563
Nontraditional Spiritualityp. 566
Spirituality as the Essence or Spirit of a Personp. 566
Markers of Spiritual Wellnessp. 568
Spirit, Socioeconomic Status, and Healthp. 573
Spiritual Wellness Self-Assessmentp. 573
New Directionsp. 574
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 574
Resourcesp. 574
Referencesp. 575
Supporting Body/Mind/Spirit at the End of Lifep. 578
Chapter Outlinep. 578
Objectivesp. 578
Introductionp. 578
Deathp. 578
Griefp. 584
Questions for Reflection and Discussionp. 587
Resourcesp. 587
Referencesp. 588
Indexp. 589
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem