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Capitalism and nationalism at the end of empire [electronic resource] : state and business in decolonizing Egypt, Nigeria, and Kenya, 1945-1963 /
Robert L. Tignor.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1998.
description
viii, 419 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0691015848 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c1998.
isbn
0691015848 (cloth : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
11257475
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [401]-403) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Robert L. Tignor is the Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Princeton University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-01:
Literature on the impact of the colonial period on the formation of the postindependent period in Africa has become richer in recent years due to a confluence of factors, including the release of public documents, the aging of the participants of the era who are now perhaps more eager to reflect upon their experiences, and a wider appreciation of events prior to the shifting of political regimes in determining the future direction of economic policy. This well-researched volume draws on diverse government and corporate archives to investigate the impact of the late colonial period on three distinct policy approaches in postcolonial Egypt, Nigeria, and Kenya. Tignor (Princeton Univ.) shows that ironically, although Egypt had by far the strongest and most sophisticated private sector before breaking with the British, the economy became heavily dominated by the state, with the regime opting for a socialist strategy. The opposite was the case in Kenya, suggesting that the influence of big business in determining the direction of postcolonial governments was rather limited. In Nigeria, the large surpluses of the colonial state marketing boards and their potential developmental role induced the independence movement to adopt more statist policies. This study of the economic aspects of decolonization is highly recommended for upper-division undergraduate collections and above. H. Stein; Roosevelt University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1999
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The two decades that followed World War II witnessed the end of the great European empires in Asia and Africa. Robert Tignor's new study of the decolonization experiences of Egypt, Nigeria, and Kenya elucidates the major factors that led to the transfer of power from British to African hands in these three territories. Employing a comparative method in order to explain the different decolonizing narratives in each territory, he argues that the different state policies toward the private business sector and foreign capital were the result of nationalist policies and attitudes and the influence of Cold War pressures on local events.Using business records as well as official government sources, the work highlights the economic aspects of decolonization and weighs the influence of nationalist movements, changes in metropolitan attitudes toward the empire, and shifts in the international balance of power in bringing about the transfer of authority. The author concludes that the business communities did not play decisive roles, adhering instead to their time-honored role of leaving political issues to colonial officials and their nationa
Unpaid Annotation
The two decades that followed World War II witnessed the end of the great European empires in Asia and Africa. Robert Tignor's new study of the decolonization experiences of Egypt, Nigeria, and Kenya elucidates the major factors that led to the transfer of power from British to African hands in these three territories. Employing a comparative method in order to explain the different decolonizing narratives in each territory, he argues that the different state policies toward the private business sector and foreign capital were the result of nationalist policies and attitudes and the influence of Cold War pressures on local events.Using business records as well as official government sources, the work highlights the economic aspects of decolonization and weighs the influence of nationalist movements, changes in metropolitan attitudes toward the empire, and shifts in the international balance of power in bringing about the transfer of authority. The author concludes that the business communities did not play decisive roles, adhering instead to their time-honored role of leaving political issues to colonial officials and their nationalist critics. Tignor also finds that the nationalist movements, far from being ineffective, largely realized the primary goals of nationalist leaders that had been articulated for many decades.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction: Perspectives on Decolonizationp. 3
Egypt
Egypt, 1945-1952p. 27
Contradictions in a Mixed Economy, 1952-1956p. 62
Prelude to the Nationalizations: Case Studies of Business-Military Tensions, 1952-1956p. 96
The Rupture, 1956-1961p. 114
Enlarging the Public Sector, 1956-1961p. 157
Nigeria
The Political Economy of Nigeria and the Great Debates, 1945-1951p. 195
The Vision Undermined, 1951-1956p. 230
The Road to Independence, 1957-1960p. 261
Kenya
Development and the Kenyan Private Sector, 1945-1952p. 293
Mau Mau and the Private Sector, 1952-1959p. 327
Stemming the Flight of Capital, 1960-1963p. 351
Conclusion: Themes and Variationsp. 387
Bibliographical Notep. 401
Indexp. 405
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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