Catalogue


Attentional processing : the brain's art of mindfulness /
David LaBerge.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1995.
description
x, 262 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0674052684
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1995.
isbn
0674052684
catalogue key
1121031
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-258) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-11:
This book provides a thoroughgoing treatment of the topic of attention. First, historical accounts by William James and others, which provide experiential details on attention, are reviewed. Next, LaBerge discusses distinctions among various types, or functions, of attention, such as selective attention and preparatory attention, and surveys findings of experimental investigations that support these distinctions. Following this, the cortical and subcortical structures of the brain that provide the primary neurophysiological sites underlying attentional processes are discussed. The author is widely regarded for his contributions to research and theory on attention; this book is yet another strong contribution, providing an account of attentional processes and findings that brings together psychological and physiological accounts of attention into a unified theoretical statement. A very well written and nicely produced work, and a strong contribution to work in the cognitive sciences, written in a style that will communicate both to practitioners and a broad audience. General; upper-division undergraduate through professional. K. F. Widaman; University of California, Riverside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A book on visual attention that will be accessible and interesting to a broad audience, from students doing their first project in cognitive science, to accomplished researchers in the field.
[Attentional Processing] provides an excellent review of research on visual attention. Together with his model of neural mechanisms of visual attention, the author also presents important principles that might be generalised to research of neural mechanisms of many other cognitive functions.
LaBerge's lucid study...is highly informative and very readable. LaBerge does full justice to the neurobiological, behavioural and subjective complexities of attention.
This book provides a thoroughgoing treatment of the topic of attention...The author is widely regarded for his contributions to research and theory on attention; this book is yet another strong contribution, providing an account of attentional processes and findings that brings together psychological and physiological accounts of attention in a unified theoretical statement. A very well written and nicely produced work, and a strong contribution to work in the cognitive sciences, written in a style that will communicate both to practitioners and a broad audience.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1995
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Summaries
Main Description
In the past two decades, the familiar experience of attention--the emphasis on a particular mental activity so that it "fills the mind"--has been subjected to much scientific inquiry. David LaBerge now provides a systematic view of the attention process as it occurs in everyday perception, thinking, and action. Drawing from a variety of research methods and findings from cognitive psychology, neurobiology, and computer science, he presents a masterful synthesis of what is understood about attentional processing. LaBerge explores how we are able to restrict the input of extraneous and confusing information, or prepare to process a future stimulus, in order to take effective action. As well as describing the pathways in the cortex presumed to be involved in attentional processing, he examines the hypothesis that two subcortical structures, the superior colliculus and the thalamus, contain circuit mechanisms that embody an algorithm of attention. In addition, he takes us through various ways of posing the problem, from an information-processing description of how attention works to a consideration of some of the cognitive and behavioral consequences of the brain's computations, such as desiring, judging, imaging, and remembering. Attentional Processing is a highly sophisticated integration of contributions from several fields of neuroscience. It brings together the latest efforts to solve the puzzle of attention: how it works, how it is modulated, what its benefits are, and how it is expressed in the brain.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
A Multidisciplinary Approachp. 3
The Goals of Attentionp. 8
The Manifestations of Attentionp. 12
The Expression of Attentionp. 14
Plan of the Bookp. 17
Selective Attentionp. 19
Early Theories of Selective Attentionp. 19
Selection of What, Where, and Whichp. 25
Six Properties of the Attended Areap. 26
Metaphors of Selective Attentionp. 38
Selection of an Object in a Cluttered Fieldp. 40
Experimental Tasksp. 42
Selective Attention to Actionsp. 45
Preparatory Attention and Maintenance Attentionp. 47
Preparatory Attentionp. 48
Attentional Preparation or Cognitive Expectation?p. 51
Perceptual Preparations for Objects and Their Attributesp. 58
Perceptual Preparation for Locations of Objectsp. 61
The "Peaked Distribution" of Attentional Activityp. 66
Shifting Visual Attention through Spacep. 69
The Resource View of Preparatory Attentionp. 87
Maintenance Attentionp. 91
Attentional Processing in Cortical Areasp. 98
Areas of Specialized (Modular) Processingp. 99
Attention to Object Information in Ventral Cortical Streamsp. 109
Attention to Spatial Information in Dorsal Cortical Streamsp. 122
Attentional Control versus Attentional Expressionp. 136
Attentional Processing in Two Subcortical Areasp. 140
The Superior Colliculusp. 140
The Thalamusp. 158
Thalamic Circuitryp. 172
A Cognitive-Neuroscience Model of Attention Processes in Shape Identificationp. 203
An Experimental Trial Containing a Warning Signal and a Targetp. 204
Summary: The Expression, Mechanism, and Control of Attention in Shape Identificationp. 210
Synopsisp. 214
A Cognitive-Neuroscience Theory of Attentionp. 217
Bibliographyp. 223
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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