Catalogue


Women in eighteenth-century Europe /
Margaret R. Hunt.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2014.
description
xi, 484 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
ISBN
0582308658 (paperback), 9780582308657 (paperback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2014.
isbn
0582308658 (paperback)
9780582308657 (paperback)
contents note
Hierarchy and difference -- Families -- Sexuality and reproduction -- Food and consumption -- Work and money -- Paths of the spirit -- Cultures of women -- Civil society and the state -- Age of revolutions.
catalogue key
11176515
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 419-468) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Margaret R. Hunt is Professor of History and Women's and Gender Studies at Amherst College.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
"This is a comprehensive and deeply perceptive study of womens experience across the European continent into Russia and the Ottoman Islamic East. Its richly learned exploration of womens lives across religions and cultures offers a persuasive argument for the reality of early modern Europe as Big Europe. This is a landmark work." Madeline Zilfi, University of Maryland Was the century of Voltaire also the century of women? In the eighteenth century changes in the nature of work, family life, sexuality, education, law, religion, politics and warfare radically altered the lives of women. Some of these developments caused immense confusion and suffering; others greatly expanded womens opportunities and worldview - long before the various womens suffrage movements were more than a glimmer on the horizon. This study pays attention to queens as well as commoners; respectable working women as well as prostitutes; women physicists and mathematicians as well as musicians and actresses; feminists as well as their critics. The result is a rich and morally complex tale of conflict and tragedy, but also of achievement.
Back Cover Copy
Margaret Hunt has given us a fascinating picture of the lives of women and men in eighteenth-century Europe, all the richer because she draws examples from Russia, the Ottoman Empire, and the Caribbean colonies. Women emerge from her pages in all their variety: slaves, merchants and queens; Protestant reformers, Jewish storytellers, and Sufi mystics. A wonderful read! Natalie Zemon Davis, Princeton University This is a comprehensive and deeply perceptive study of women's experience across the European continent into Russia and the Ottoman Islamic East. Its richly learned exploration of women's lives across religions and cultures offers a persuasive argument for the reality of early modern Europe as 'Big Europe'. This is a landmark work. Madeline Zilfi, University of Maryland Was the century of Voltaire also the century of women? In the eighteenth century changes in the nature of work, family life, sexuality, education, law, religion, politics and warfare radically altered the lives of women. Some of these developments caused immense confusion and suffering; others greatly expanded women's opportunities and worldview - long before the various women's suffrage movements were more than a glimmer on the horizon. This study pays attention to queens as well as commoners; respectable working women as well as prostitutes; women physicists and mathematicians as well as musicians and actresses; feminists as well as their critics. The result is a rich and morally complex tale of conflict and tragedy, but also of achievement. The book deals with many regions and topics often under-represented in general surveys of European women, including coverage of the Balkans and both European Turkey and Anatolia, of Eastern Europe, of European colonial expansion (particularly the slave trade) and of Muslim, Eastern Orthodox, and Jewish women's history. Bringingallof Europe into the narrative of early modern women's history challenges many received assumptions about Europe and women in past times, and provides essential background for dealing with issues of diversity in the Europe of today.
Main Description
Was the century of Voltaire also the century of women? In the eighteenth century changes in the nature of work, family life, sexuality, education, law, religion, politics and warfare radically altered the lives of women. Some of these developments caused immense confusion and suffering; others greatly expanded women's opportunities and world view, long before the various women's suffrage movements were even a glimmer on the horizon. This study pays attention to queens as well as commoners; respectable working women as well as prostitutes; women physicists and mathematicians; musicians and actresses; and feminists as well as their critics. The result is a rich and morally complex tale of conflict and tragedy, but also of achievement.
Main Description
This is a comprehensive and deeply perceptive study of women#146;s experience across the European continent into Russia and the Ottoman Islamic East. Its richly learned exploration of women#146;s lives across religions and cultures offers a persuasive argument for the reality of early modern Europe as 'Big Europe'. This is a landmark work. Madeline Zilfi, University of Maryland Was the century of Voltaire also the century of women? In the eighteenth century changes in the nature of work, family life, sexuality, education, law, religion, politics and warfare radically altered the lives of women. Some of these developments caused immense confusion and suffering; others greatly expanded women#146;s opportunities and worldview -- long before the various women#146;s suffrage movements were more than a glimmer on the horizon. This study pays attention to queens as well as commoners; respectable working women as well as prostitutes; women physicists and mathematicians as well as musicians and actresses; feminists as well as their critics. The result is a rich and morally complex tale of conflict and tragedy, but also of achievement.
Main Description
A comprehensive, broad, and enlightening look at the role of women in the Eighteenth Century which looks beyond the margins of western Europe. Importantly, this title expands on the traditional view of Europe and concentrates on Ottoman and Russian regions as well as more typically studied Western Europe Contains a specific chapter on revolution and reform in womens' lives Comprehensive coverage of the life-cycle, and of women and wealth, culture and religion
Bowker Data Service Summary
The fourth volume in 'The Longman History of European Women' series, 'Women in Eighteenth Century Europe' considers the role of women and their interaction in Europe as a whole including areas under Ottoman and Russian influence.
Long Description
This is a comprehensive and deeply perceptive study of women's experience across the European continent into Russia and the Ottoman Islamic East. Its richly learned exploration of women's lives across religions and cultures offers a persuasive argument for the reality of early modern Europe as 'Big Europe'. This is a landmark work. Madeline Zilfi, University of Maryland Was the century of Voltaire also the century of women? In the eighteenth century changes in the nature of work, family life, sexuality, education, law, religion, politics and warfare radically altered the lives of women. Some of these developments caused immense confusion and suffering; others greatly expanded women's opportunities and worldview - long before the various women's suffrage movements were more than a glimmer on the horizon. This study pays attention to queens as well as commoners; respectable working women as well as prostitutes; women physicists and mathematicians as well as musicians and actresses; feminists as well as their critics. The result is a rich and morally complex tale of conflict and tragedy, but also of achievement.
Back Cover Copy
Margaret Hunt has given us a fascinating picture of the lives of women and men in eighteenth-century Europe, all the richer because she draws examples from Russia, the Ottoman Empire, and the Caribbean colonies. Women emerge from her pages in all their variety: slaves, merchants and queens; Protestant reformers, Jewish storytellers, and Sufi mystics. A wonderful read! Natalie Zemon Davis, Princeton University This is a comprehensive and deeply perceptive study of women's experience across the European continent into Russia and the Ottoman Islamic East. Its richly learned exploration of women's lives across religions and cultures offers a persuasive argument for the reality of early modern Europe as 'Big Europe'. This is a landmark work. Madeline Zilfi, University of Maryland Was the century of Voltaire also the century of women? In the eighteenth century changes in the nature of work, family life, sexuality, education, law, religion, politics and warfare radically altered the lives of women. Some of these developments caused immense confusion and suffering; others greatly expanded women's opportunities and worldview - long before the various women's suffrage movements were more than a glimmer on the horizon. This study pays attention to queens as well as commoners; respectable working women as well as prostitutes; women physicists and mathematicians as well as musicians and actresses; feminists as well as their critics. The result is a rich and morally complex tale of conflict and tragedy, but also of achievement. The book deals with many regions and topics often under-represented in general surveys of European women, including coverage of the Balkans and both European Turkey and Anatolia, of Eastern Europe, of European colonial expansion (particularly the slave trade) and of Muslim, Eastern Orthodox, and Jewish women's history. Bringing all of Europe into the narrative of early modern women's history challenges many received assumptions about Europe and women in past times, and provides essential background for dealing with issues of diversity in the Europe of today.
Back Cover Copy
Margaret Hunt has given us a fascinating picture of the lives of women and men in eighteenth-century Europe, all the richer because she draws examples from Russia, the Ottoman Empire, and the Caribbean colonies. Women emerge from her pages in all their variety: slaves, merchants and queens; Protestant reformers, Jewish storytellers, and Sufi mystics. A wonderful read! Natalie Zemon Davis, Princeton University This is a comprehensive and deeply perceptive study of women#146;s experience across the European continent into Russia and the Ottoman Islamic East. Its richly learned exploration of women#146;s lives across religions and cultures offers a persuasive argument for the reality of early modern Europe as 'Big Europe'. This is a landmark work. Madeline Zilfi, University of Maryland Was the century of Voltaire also the century of women? In the eighteenth century changes in the nature of work, family life, sexuality, education, law, religion, politics and warfare radically altered the lives of women. Some of these developments caused immense confusion and suffering; others greatly expanded women#146;s opportunities and worldview -- long before the various women#146;s suffrage movements were more than a glimmer on the horizon. This study pays attention to queens as well as commoners; respectable working women as well as prostitutes; women physicists and mathematicians as well as musicians and actresses; feminists as well as their critics. The result is a rich and morally complex tale of conflict and tragedy, but also of achievement. The book deals with many regions and topics often under-represented in general surveys of European women, including coverage of the Balkans and both European Turkey and Anatolia, of Eastern Europe, of European colonial expansion (particularly the slave trade) and of Muslim, Eastern Orthodox, and Jewish women#146;s history. Bringing all of Europe into the narrative of early modern women#146;s history challenges many received assumptions about Europe and women in past times, and provides essential background for dealing with issues of diversity in the Europe of today.
Table of Contents
List of Platesp. vi
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Publisher's Acknowledgementsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Hierarchy and Differencep. 13
Familiesp. 49
Sexuality and Reproductionp. 90
Food and Consumptionp. 134
Work and Moneyp. 168
Paths of the Spiritp. 209
Cultures of Womenp. 251
Civil Society and the Statep. 287
Age of Revolutionsp. 333
Conclusionp. 375
Notesp. 383
Further Readingp. 411
Bibliographyp. 419
Indexp. 469
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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