Catalogue


Lord North : the prime minister who lost America /
Peter Whiteley.
imprint
London ; Rio Grande, Ohio : Hambledon Press, 1996.
description
xix, 275 p., 8 p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1852851457 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; Rio Grande, Ohio : Hambledon Press, 1996.
isbn
1852851457 (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
1106322
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [263]-267) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-08:
For more than three decades Frederick, Lord North (1732-92) was at the heart of English and imperial politics, most critically as George III's first minister between 1770 and 1782. Whiteley's study supersedes P.D.G. Thomas's brief Lord North (CH, Nov'76) and Alan Valentine's Lord North (CH, May'68) as an up-to-date analysis of North's political career. Whiteley's book will be useful to Americanists who desire a better understanding of the contexts of British politics in the late 18th century. It will also be valuable to students of British history who wonder how a man who succeeded in binding king, Lords, and Commons after years of factional division would prove so clumsy in waging, by statecraft and warfare, the struggle against the Americans. Part of the answer is North's concept of events in North America as more like a foreign than a civil war. Nevertheless, the definitive biography of North, one based on an extensive analysis of the private papers of his contemporaries, remains to be written. All levels. M. Baer; Hope College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"the best book on North to date" --J.C.D. Clark
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 1997
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Lord North was in many ways a most successful politician. Prime Minister for an unbroken twelve years, his management of both parliament and of the business of government was adept. He enjoyed the confidence of King George III, not always an easy political ally, avoided factional strife (having no political following of his own), was notably uncorrupt and made virtually no enemies. In many ways he epitomised the political outlook and aristocratic assumptions of the eighteenth century. He is, however, principally remembered for presiding over Britain's loss of her American colonies. Lord North: The Prime Minister Who Lost America is a scholarly but highly readable account of his life. It includes a full study of the American War of Independence, examining it from the perspective of the British government as well as from the colonial standpoint. No senior politician had visited America and few had a proper knowledge or understanding of Americans. Too often the colonists were regarded as unruly and ungrateful children, with whom compromise was either a sign of weakness or the betrayal of the principle of parliamentary sovereignty. Highmindedness contributed to the final humiliation, as did ignorant overconfidence. Military defeat, to a country that had become preeminent in Europe by the end of the Seven Years War, was not entertained as a possibility.
Main Description
Lord North was, in many ways, a successful politician. He is, however, remembered for presiding over Britain's loss of her American colonies. This book presents an account of his life, and also includes a study of the American War of Independence, examining it from the perspective of the British government as well as from the colonial standpoint.
Table of Contents
Illustrations
Preface
Introduction
Background and Upbringing
Coming of Age
Political Apprenticeship
A Man with a Future
Arrival
The King's Firsy Minister
A Confident Start
The East India Company
The Good Years
The Thirteen Colonies
The Gathering Storm
Wartime Prime Minister
After Saratoga
The Road to Yorktown
The End of an Era
The Coalition and the Last Decade
Conclusion
Appendix
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem