Catalogue


Autonomy and mental disorder /
edited by Lubomira Radoilska.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
xli, 285 pages ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199595429, 9780199595426
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199595429
9780199595426
contents note
pt. I Mapping the conceptual landscape -- 1. Mental disorder and the value(s) of àutonomy' / Jane Heal -- 2. Autonomy and neuroscience / Alfred R. Mele -- 3. Three challenges from delusion for theories of autonomy / Lubomira Radoilska -- pt. II Autonomy in light of mental disorder -- 4. Does mental disorder involve loss of personal autonomy? / Natalie Banner -- 5. Rationality and self-knowledge in delusion and confabulation: implications for autonomy as self-governance / Matteo Mameli -- 6. Privacy and patient autonomy in mental healthcare / Jennifer Radden -- pt. III Rethinking capacity and respect for autonomy -- 7. Clarifying capacity: value and reasons / Jules Holroyd -- 8. Mental Capacity Act and conceptions of the good / Elizabeth Fistein -- 9. Autonomy, value, and the first person / Hallvard Lillehammer -- pt. IV Emerging alternatives -- 10. Autonomy, dialogue, and practical rationality / Tineke A. Abma -- 11. How do I learn to be me again? Autonomy, life skills, and identity / Grant Gillett -- 12. Autonomy and Ulysses arrangements / Lubomira Radoilska.
catalogue key
11055672
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lubomira Radoilska is Affiliated Lecturer in the Faculty of Philosophy at Cambridge University and Research Associate of the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at Oxford University. She is the author of Aristotle and the Moral Philosophy of Today (2007).
Reviews
Review Quotes
American psychiatrists will find this book fresh in at least two respects: (1) that it approaches individualistic autonomy from a questioning rather than an idealizing stance and (2) that it departs somewhat from the usual competency/capacity forensic focus that orthodox medical education tends to take on the subject... Whilst this text is digestible enough to be read cover to cover, its contents are not iterative; readers can easily pick and choose the chapters that seem mostgermane to their practices and curiosities. Regardless, they will find valuable investigations into what it means to be autonomous and what it means to be respectful of others' autonomy.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Autonomy is a fundamental though contested concept. For instance, most of us place great value on the opportunity to make our own decisions and to be able to lead a life of our own choosing. Yet there is stark disagreement on what is involved in being able to decide autonomously, as well as how important this is compared with other commitments. For example, the success of every group project requires that group members make decisions about the project collectively rather than eachon their own. This disagreement notwithstanding, mental disorder is routinely assumed to put a strain on autonomy. However, it is unclear whether this is effectively the case and, if so, whether this is due to the nature of mental disorder or of the social stigma that is often attached to it. 'Autonomy and Mental Disorder' is the first exploration of the nature and value of autonomy with reference to mental disorder. By reflecting on instances of mental disorder where autonomy is apparently compromised, it offers a systematic discussion of the underlying presuppositions of the present autonomy debates. In so doing, it helps address different kinds of emerging scepticism questioning either the appeal of autonomy as a concept or its relevance to specific areas of normative ethics,including psychiatric ethics. Written by leading figures in philosophy and psychiatry, 'Autonomy and Mental Disorder' will appeal to a wide range of readers in these and related disciplines. Lubomira Radoilska is Affiliated Lecturer in the Faculty of Philosophy at Cambridge University and Research Associate of the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at Oxford University. She is the author of 'Aristotle and the Moral Philosophy of Today' (2007).
Long Description
Autonomy is a fundamental though contested concept. For instance, most of us place great value on the opportunity to make our own decisions and to be able to lead a life of our own choosing. Yet there is stark disagreement on what is involved in being able to decide autonomously., This disagreement notwithstanding, mental disorder is routinely assumed to put a strain on autonomy; however, it is unclear whether this is effectively the case and, if so, whether this is due to thenature of mental disorder or of the social stigma that is often attached to it. 'Autonomy and Mental Disorder' is the first exploration into the nature and value of autonomy with reference to mental disorder. By reflecting on instances of mental disorder where autonomy is apparently compromised, it offers a systematic discussion of the underlying presuppositions of the present autonomy debates. In so doing, it helps address different kinds of emerging scepticism questioning either the appeal of autonomy as a concept or its relevance to specific areas of normative ethics,including psychiatric ethics. Written by leading figures in philosophy and psychiatry, 'Autonomy and Mental Disorder' will appeal to a wide range of readers in these and related disciplines.
Long Description
Autonomy is a fundamental though contested concept in both philosophy as well as in the broader intellectual culture of today's liberal societies. For instance, most of us place great value on the opportunity to make our own decisions and to be able to lead a life of our own choosing. Yet, there is stark disagreement on what is involved in being able to decide autonomously, as well as how important this is compared with other commitments, for example in cases where our membership ofa particular group means we cannot make decisions for ourself but have to do so collectively. In particular, mental disorder is routinely assumed to put a strain on autonomy. However, it is unclear whether this is effectively the case and, if so, whether this is due to the nature of mental disorderor of the social stigma that is often attached to it. 'Autonomy and Mental Disorder' is the first exploration into the nature and scope of personal autonomy with reference to mental disorder. By reflecting on instances of mental disorder where autonomy is apparently compromised, it offers a systematic discussion of the underlying presuppositions of the present autonomy debates in philosophy, law, and psychiatry. In so doing, it helps address different kinds of emerging scepticism questioning either the appeal of autonomy as a concept or itsrelevance to specific areas of normative ethics, including psychiatric ethics. The book includes chapters focused on key methodological and substantive assumptions about personal autonomy and mental disorder (Part I); significant links between the concepts of mental disorder, freedom, and rationality (Part II); possible tensions between respect for autonomy and further values in the context of decisional capacity assessments (Part III) and; promising accounts of autonomy with reference to mental disorder (Part IV).Including chapters from a range of leading figures from medicine and the humanities, this is an important and thought provoking new contribution to the philosophy and psychiatry literature
Main Description
Autonomy is a fundamental though contested concept. For instance, most of us place great value on the opportunity to make our own decisions and to be able to lead a life of our own choosing. Yet there is stark disagreement on what is involved in being able to decide autonomously, as well as how important this is compared with other commitments. For example, the success of every group project requires that group members make decisions about the project collectively rather than each on their own. This disagreement notwithstanding, mental disorder is routinely assumed to put a strain on autonomy. However, it is unclear whether this is effectively the case and, if so, whether this is due to the nature of mental disorder or of the social stigma that is often attached to it. Autonomy and Mental Disorder is the first exploration of the nature and value of autonomy with reference to mental disorder. By reflecting on instances of mental disorder where autonomy is apparently compromised, it offers a systematic discussion of the underlying presuppositions of the present autonomy debates. In so doing, it helps address different kinds of emerging scepticism questioning either the appeal of autonomy as a concept or its relevance to specific areas of normative ethics, including psychiatric ethics. Written by leading figures in philosophy and psychiatry, Autonomy and Mental Disorder will appeal to a wide range of readers in these and related disciplines.
Main Description
Autonomy is a fundamental though contested concept. For instance, most of us place great value on the opportunity to make our own decisions and to be able to lead a life of our own choosing. Yet there is stark disagreement on what is involved in being able to decide autonomously, as well ashow important this is compared with other commitments. For example, the success of every group project requires that group members make decisions about the project collectively rather than each on their own. This disagreement notwithstanding, mental disorder is routinely assumed to put a strain onautonomy. However, it is unclear whether this is effectively the case and, if so, whether this is due to the nature of mental disorder or of the social stigma that is often attached to it. Autonomy and Mental Disorder is the first exploration of the nature and value of autonomy with reference to mental disorder. By reflecting on instances of mental disorder where autonomy is apparently compromised, it offers a systematic discussion of the underlying presuppositions of the presentautonomy debates. In so doing, it helps address different kinds of emerging scepticism questioning either the appeal of autonomy as a concept or its relevance to specific areas of normative ethics, including psychiatric ethics. Written by leading figures in philosophy and psychiatry, Autonomy and Mental Disorder will appeal to a wide range of readers in these and related disciplines.
Main Description
The concept of autonomy is highly relevant to medical ethics and mental health. The autonomy of an individual can be affected by certain mental disorders, with implications for how we treat them (or even forcefully treat them), or ascribe blame for events they bring about. Autonomy and Mental Disorder identifies and explores some underlying connections between the concepts of autonomy, decisional capacity, and mental disorder. It brings togetherphilosophers and psychiatrists focusing on cases where autonomy is deemed to have broken down. Some of the questions that authors address include: does the notion of capacity necessarily involve some evaluative components? How does it relate to the notion of autonomy? What are the defining features of mentaldisorder? Should they comprise distress and diminished control over one's actions? Could philosophical conceptions of autonomy account for psychiatric cases in which autonomy is deemed to be compromised? Would the standard distinction between moral and personal autonomy be applicable? Autonomy and Mental Disorder will be of interest to psychiatrists, philosophers, and forensic psychologists.
Table of Contents
List of contributorsp. vii
Introduction: personal autonomy, decisional capacity, and mental disorderp. ix
Mapping the conceptual landscape
Mental disorder and the value(s) of æautonomy'p. 3
Autonomy and neurosciencep. 26
Three challenges from delusion for theories of autonomyp. 44
Autonomy in light of mental disorder
Does mental disorder involve loss of personal autonomy?p. 77
Rationality and self-knowledge in delusion and confabulation: implications for autonomy as self-governancep. 100
Privacy and patient autonomy in mental healthcarep. 123
Rethinking capacity and respect for autonomy
Clarifying capacity: value and reasonsp. 145
The Mental Capacity Act and conceptions of the goodp. 170
Autonomy, value, and the first personp. 192
Emerging alternatives
Autonomy, dialogue, and practical rationalityp. 217
How do I learn to be me again? Autonomy, life skills, and identityp. 233
Autonomy and Ulysses arrangementsp. 252
Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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