Catalogue

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Edwardian fiction : an Oxford companion /
Sandra Kemp, Charlotte Mitchell, David Trotter.
imprint
Oxford [England] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
description
xxxi, 431 p.
ISBN
0198117604
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Oxford [England] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
isbn
0198117604
catalogue key
1096504
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a luxuriant and often exotic flowering of fiction both literary andpopular ... this is a lost generation: it's time they were recovered ... Thisclear, readable companion will be a handy guide for those who feel tempted totry.'Michael Kerrigan, The Scotsman
"A luxuriant and often exotic flowering of fiction both literary and popular...this is a lost generation: it's time they were recovered. This clear, readable companion will be a handy guide for those who feel tempted to try."--Michael Kerrigan, The Scotsman
'a useful survey of famous and forgotten novelists from a particularlyproductive period in British writing ... an ideal crib for lazy students of allages'Peter Burton, Gay Times
'a useful survey of famous and forgotten novelists from a particularly productive period in British writing ... an ideal crib for lazy students of all ages'Peter Burton, Gay Times
'Edwardian Fiction is sound on the different kinds of novel that werebeing written between 1900 and 1914, and the ways in which they were published.'Jeremy Lewis, The Observer
'Edwardian Fiction is sound on the different kinds of novel that were being written between 1900 and 1914, and the ways in which they were published.'Jeremy Lewis, The Observer
'excellent new Oxford Companion ... The great charm of this book is in itsaccount of these lesser figures, rather than household names. ... We learn oddfacts about the better known authors as well.'Spectator, 26 July 1997
'excellent new Oxford Companion ... The great charm of this book is in its account of these lesser figures, rather than household names. ... We learn odd facts about the better known authors as well.'Spectator, 26 July 1997
'the primary service they provide is appreciation of the sheer variety ofthe fiction published in this period ... The Companion covers an enormous field... a tremendous achievement ... It resuscitates hundreds of authors and drivesfresh pathways through the field.'Times Literary Supplement
'the primary service they provide is appreciation of the sheer variety of the fiction published in this period ... The Companion covers an enormous field ... a tremendous achievement ... It resuscitates hundreds of authors and drives fresh pathways through the field.'Times Literary Supplement
'this will be an exceptionally useful reference work ... The strengths ofthe book are many. The essays on publishers and literary agents are particularlyilluminating. One could ... consult this book for a variety of reasons ... orsimply to enjoy a wonderful browse ... Whatever the purpose, the reader will Ithink be richly rewarded by this well-researched, well-written, and well-editedbook.'Alan Holden, Housman Society Journal Vol. 23
'this will be an exceptionally useful reference work ... The strengths of the book are many. The essays on publishers and literary agents are particularly illuminating. One could ... consult this book for a variety of reasons ... or simply to enjoy a wonderful browse ... Whatever the purpose,the reader will I think be richly rewarded by this well-researched, well-written, and well-edited book.'Alan Holden, Housman Society Journal Vol. 23
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, June 1997
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This companion defines and explores a period that contains some of the most important writing in the 20th century. It reveals a whole world of popular fiction, and in particular fiction by women, through over 800 author entries and numerous articles.
Long Description
The Edwardian age was a great age for English fiction. Many classic novels, some of them subsequently adapted for film and television, were first published then - Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Lost World; E. M. Forster's A Room with a View and Howard's End; Conrad's Lord Jim and Nostromo; for children, Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden and A Little Princess and Kipling's Puck of Pook's Hill, Kim, and Just So Stories; the first of Galsworthy's Forsyte novels, The Man of Property; Erskine Childers's great spy story The Riddle of the Sands; Arnold Bennett's Clayhanger; Baroness Orczy's The Scarlet Pimpernel; D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers. But alongside such well-known and never out of print titles there was a wealth of other writing, much of it forgotten or half-forgotten, some of it unjustly neglected, and all of it important to the literary context in which the enduringly popular works were produced. This Companion examines the broad sweep of fiction-writing in the first decade and a half of the century, from 1900 to the outbreak of the First World War - a period when novels in Britain were produced more cheaply, and read more widely, than ever before - providing over 800 author-entries as well as articles on individual books, literary periodicals, and general topics. With the excitement of the new century came fiction from new sources, which explored new subjects and was read by new audiences. Significant social developments and themes can be traced both in the Companion at large and via the topic entries, which for the first time allow the reader to explore all the novels in a particular genre. It was a period when the urban middle and lower classes became not only the subject of fiction - Wells's Tono-Bungay and Mr Polly, Galsworthy's Fraternity, Bennett's stories of the Five Towns - but a substantial part of its readership. Genres such as spy stories, Ruritanian novels, and detective fiction were invented or suddenly came into their own, each with its following of readers. An unprecedented number of women began to publish - they represent nearly half the author-entries here - though many of them chose to do so under noms de plume. From James's The Ambassadors to Beerbohm's Zuleika Dobson, from J. H. Abbott to Israel Zangwill, from the Boer War to Suburban Life, Edwardian Fiction offers unique access to the books, writers, and preoccupations of a fascinating literary era.
Long Description
The Edwardian era saw a remarkable outpouring of fiction, much of which we don't normally think of as Edwardian. There were major works such as Conrad's Lord Jim and Nostromo, Samuel Butler's The Way of All Flesh, and D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers. Children's literature saw such marvelous books as Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden and A Little Princess, and there were many popular classics as well, such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles and Baroness Orczy's The Scarlet Pimpernel. Now, in Edwardian Fiction: An Oxford Companion, readers have an illuminating guide to this remarkable but little known period, covering the literary scene in the years from 1900 to the outbreak of the First World War. Here are over a thousand alphabetically arranged entries, including some 800 biographies of major and minor authors. Profiles range from such eminent literary figures as Arnold Bennett, John Galsworthy, Katherine Mansfield, and H.G. Wells, to popular writers such as Marie Corelli, Rider Haggard, and Bram Stoker. The Companion also boasts entries on some 250 works of fiction--complete with plot outlines--including such important works as E. M. Forster's A Room with a View and Howard's End, Henry James's The Golden Bowl, and James Joyce's Dubliners, major children's books such as The Wind in the Willows and Kipling's Just So Stories, and bestselling volumes such as Sax Rohmer's The Mystery of Dr. Fu Manchu and G.K. Chesterton's The Innocence of Father Brown. The Companion also covers novels from other English-speaking countries, such as L.M. Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables (Canada) and Miles Franklin's My Brilliant Career (Australia). Ranging from Henry James's The Ambassadors to Max Beerbohm's Zuleika Dobson, this superb volume captures the books, writers, and preoccupations of a fascinating literary era. It will help readers to reconsider a literary epoch they may have overlooked in the past.
Main Description
The Edwardian age was a great age for English fiction. Many classic novels, some of them subsequently adapted for film and television, were first published then - Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Lost World; E. M. Forster's A Room with a View and Howard's End; Conrad's LordJim and Nostromo; for children, Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden and A Little Princess and Kipling's Puck of Pook's Hill, Kim, and Just So Stories; the first of Galsworthy's Forsyte novels, The Man of Property; Erskine Childers's great spy story The Riddle of the Sands; Arnold Bennett'sClayhanger; Baroness Orczy's The Scarlet Pimpernel; D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers. But alongside such well-known and never out of print titles there was a wealth of other writing, much of it forgotten or half-forgotten, some of it unjustly neglected, and all of it important to the literarycontext in which the enduringly popular works were produced. This Companion examines the broad sweep of fiction-writing in the first decade and a half of the century, from 1900 to the outbreak of the First World War - a period when novels in Britain were produced more cheaply, and read more widely,than ever before - providing over 800 author-entries as well as articles on individual books, literary periodicals, and general topics. With the excitement of the new century came fiction from new sources, which explored new subjects and was read by new audiences. Significant social developments and themes can be traced both in the Companion at large and via the topic entries, which for the first time allow the reader to exploreall the novels in a particular genre. It was a period when the urban middle and lower classes became not only the subject of fiction - Wells's Tono-Bungay and Mr Polly, Galsworthy's Fraternity, Bennett's stories of the Five Towns - but a substantial part of its readership. Genres such as spystories, Ruritanian novels, and detective fiction were invented or suddenly came into their own, each with its following of readers. An unprecedented number of women began to publish - they represent nearly half the author-entries here - though many of them chose to do so under noms de plume. From James's The Ambassadors to Beerbohm's Zuleika Dobson, from J. H. Abbott to Israel Zangwill, from the Boer War to Suburban Life, Edwardian Fiction offers unique access to the books, writers, and preoccupations of a fascinating literary era.
Main Description
The Edwardian era saw a remarkable outpouring of fiction, much of which we don't normally think of as Edwardian. There were major works such as Conrad's Lord Jim and Nostromo , Samuel Butler's The Way of All Flesh , and D. H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers . Children's literature saw such marvelous books as Frances Hodgson Burnett's The Secret Garden and A Little Princess , and there were many popular classics as well, such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles and Baroness Orczy's The Scarlet Pimpernel . Now, in Edwardian Fiction: An Oxford Companion , readers have an illuminating guide to this remarkable but little known period, covering the literary scene in the years from 1900 to the outbreak of the First World War. Here are over a thousand alphabetically arranged entries, including some 800 biographies of major and minor authors. Profiles range from such eminent literary figures as Arnold Bennett, John Galsworthy, Katherine Mansfield, and H.G. Wells, to popular writers such as Marie Corelli, Rider Haggard, and Bram Stoker. The Companion also boasts entries on some 250 works of fiction--complete with plot outlines--including such important works as E. M. Forster's A Room with a View and Howard's End , Henry James's The Golden Bowl , and James Joyce's Dubliners , major children's books such as The Wind in the Willows and Kipling's Just So Stories , and bestselling volumes such as Sax Rohmer's The Mystery of Dr. Fu Manchu and G.K. Chesterton's The Innocence of Father Brown . The Companion also covers novels from other English-speaking countries, such as L.M. Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables (Canada) and Miles Franklin's My Brilliant Career (Australia). Ranging from Henry James's The Ambassadors to Max Beerbohm's Zuleika Dobson , this superb volume captures the books, writers, and preoccupations of a fascinating literary era. It will help readers to reconsider a literary epoch they may have overlooked in the past.
Main Description
The Edwardian era saw a remarkable outpouring of fiction, much of which we don't normally think of as Edwardian. There were major works such as Conrad'sLord JimandNostromo, Samuel Butler'sThe Way of All Flesh, and D. H. Lawrence'sSons and Lovers. Children's literature saw such marvelous books as Frances Hodgson Burnett'sThe Secret GardenandA Little Princess, and there were many popular classics as well, such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle'sThe Hound of the Baskervillesand Baroness Orczy'sThe Scarlet Pimpernel. Now, inEdwardian Fiction: An Oxford Companion, readers have an illuminating guide to this remarkable but little known period, covering the literary scene in the years from 1900 to the outbreak of the First World War. Here are over a thousand alphabetically arranged entries, including some 800 biographies of major and minor authors. Profiles range from such eminent literary figures as Arnold Bennett, John Galsworthy, Katherine Mansfield, and H.G. Wells, to popular writers such as Marie Corelli, Rider Haggard, and Bram Stoker. TheCompanionalso boasts entries on some 250 works of fiction--complete with plot outlines--including such important works as E. M. Forster'sA Room with a ViewandHoward's End, Henry James'sThe Golden Bowl, and James Joyce'sDubliners, major children's books such asThe Wind in the Willowsand Kipling'sJust So Stories, and bestselling volumes such as Sax Rohmer'sThe Mystery of Dr. Fu Manchuand G.K. Chesterton'sThe Innocence of Father Brown. TheCompanionalso covers novels from other English-speaking countries, such as L.M. Montgomery'sAnne of Green Gables(Canada) and Miles Franklin'sMy Brilliant Career(Australia). Ranging from Henry James'sThe Ambassadorsto Max Beerbohm'sZuleika Dobson, this superb volume captures the books, writers, and preoccupations of a fascinating literary era. It will help readers to reconsider a literary epoch they may have overlooked in the past.

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