Catalogue


Human rights and democratization in Latin America : Uruguay and Chile /
Alexandra Barahona de Brito.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c1997.
description
xii, 333 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0198280386
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c1997.
isbn
0198280386
contents note
Problems of transitional truth and justice in comparative perspective and human rights violations under military rule in Uruguay and Chile -- Truth and justice in transition -- Truth and justice under successor democratic regimes -- Assessing truth and justice in Uruguay and Chile : the road to democratic consolidation?
catalogue key
1084689
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [293]-327) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-05-01:
Comprehensive and characteristic of the intellectual quality of Oxford Univ. Press, Barahona de Brito's study represents a valuable contribution to the fields of human rights and Latin American studies. Introductory chapters argue that in the aftermath of institutionalized state repression the goals of truth and justice are restricted by specific political constraints and that both goals may not be realizable or necessary for the democratic consolidation of successor governments. Barahona de Brito (Institute for European-Latin American Relations, Spain) reviews international cases of truth and reconciliation commissions, and compares theory and practice in Uruguay and Chile. In both countries, military takeovers against leftist enemies initiated state terror and violations of human rights. The two cases effectively flesh out the patterns of successful human rights policy and demonstrate key arguments: "total" truth and justice is impossible; national political conditions of the transition to democracy limit accountability; past accountability is not necessary for future consolidation of democracy; and truth and justice are important ends that affirm democracy. In the end "the intensely political nature of the human rights issue" produced in Uruguay "an unofficial truth and absent justice," and in Chile, "partial truth and symbolic justice." An intriguing irony emerges--the more democratic Uruguayan transition contributed to a failed human rights policy. Readable, unique in purpose and design, and impeccably researched, this work is highly recommended for all readers, and students and scholars in foreign policy, human rights, and conflict resolution. W. Q. Morales University of Central Florida
Reviews
Review Quotes
'although the author does not provide a fully developed theory of transition and truth-telling, the lessons of this compelling book can be extended to other least likely cases, such as Paraguay and South Africa.'International and Comparative Law Quarterly, vol.46, July 1997
'although the author does not provide a fully developed theory oftransition and truth-telling, the lessons of this compelling book can beextended to other least likely cases, such as Paraguay and South Africa.'International and Comparative Law Quarterly, vol.46, July 1997
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
This insightful new work analyses the attempts by Chile and Uruguay to resolve the human rights violations conflicts inherited from military dictatorships. The author focuses on how the post-transitional democratic governments dealt with demmands for official recognition of the truth about the human rights violations committed by the military regimes and for punishment of those guilty of committing or ordering those offences. Alexandra DeBrito sheds light on the political conditions which permitted - or prevented - the politics of truth-telling and justice under these successor regimes. This is the first study to make comparative assessment of human rights abuse in Uruguay and Chile in this way. The author contends that the experiences of these countries offer formative examples of attempts to tackle fundamental aspects of the policies of transition and democratization. She makes an original contribution to our understanding of the key political, legal, and moral issues involved.
Long Description
This study analyzes the attempts by Chile and Uruguay to resolve the human rights violations conflicts inherited from military dictatorships. Alexandra de Brito sheds light on the political conditions which permitted--or prevented--the policies of truth-telling and justice under these successor regimes. She is the first to make comparative assessment of human rights abuse in Uruguay and Chile in this way and makes an original contribution to our understanding of the key political, legal, and moral issues involved.
Main Description
Human Rights and Democratization in Latin America analyses the attempts byChile and Uruguay to resolve the human rights violations conflicts inheritedfrom military dictatorships. The author focuses on how the post-transitionaldemocratic governments dealt with demands for official recognition of the truthabout violations committed by the military regimes and for punishment of thoseguilty of committing or ordering those offences. Alexandra de Brito sheds lighton the political conditions which permitted - or prevented - the policies oftruth-telling and justice under these successor regimes.Human Rights and Democratization in Latin America is the first study to makecomparative assessment of human rights abuse in Uruguay and Chile in this way.The author contends that the experiences of these countries offer formativeexamples of attempts to tackle fundamental aspects of the policies of transitionand democratization, and makes an original contribution to our understanding ofthe key political, legal, and moral issues involved.Series Description:Oxford Studies in DemocratizationSeries Editor: Laurence WhiteheadOxford Studies in Democratization is a series for scholars and students ofcomparative politics and related disciplines. Volumes will concentrate on thecomparative study of the democratization processes that accompanied the declineand termination of the cold war. The geographical focus of the series willprimarily be Latin America, the Caribbean, Southern and Eastern Europe, andrelevant experiences in Africa and Asia.
Main Description
This insightful new work analyses the attempts by Chile and Uruguay to resolve the human rights violations conflicts inherited from military dictatorships. The author focuses on how the post-transitional democratic governments dealt with demmands for official recognition of the truth aboutthe human rights violations committed by the military regimes and for punishment of those guilty of committing or ordering those offences. Alexandra DeBrito sheds light on the political conditions which permitted - or prevented - the politics of truth-telling and justice under these successorregimes. This is the first study to make comparative assessment of human rights abuse in Uruguay and Chile in this way. The author contends that the experiences of these countries offer formative examples of attempts to tackle fundamental aspects of the policies of transition and democratization. Shemakes an original contribution to our understanding of the key political, legal, and moral issues involved.
Table of Contents
oxford Studies In Democratizationp. i
Oxford Studies in Democratizationp. ii
Human Rights and Democratization in Latin Americap. iii
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Abbreviationsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Problems of Transitional Truth and Justice in Comparative Perspective and Human Rights Violations Under Military Rule in Uruguay and Chilep. 15
Confronting Legacies of State Repression: Uruguay and Chile in Comparative Perspectivep. 17
The Dynamic of Military Repression in Uruguay and Chile: Ideology and Resistance to Truth and Justicep. 38
Truth and Justice in Transitionp. 67
Negotiating Truth and Justice in the Transition to Democracy in Uruguay, 1980-1985p. 69
Truth and Justice in the Transitional Period in Chile, 1988-1990p. 98
Truth and Justice Under Successor Democratic Regimesp. 123
The Long and Tortuous Path to Military Amnesty and the Referendum in Uruguay, 1985-1989p. 125
Negotiating Truth, Justice, and Pardons Under the ConcertaciĆ³n Governments of Aylwin 1990-1993 and Frei 1993-p. 152
Assessing Truth and Justice in Uruguay and Chile: the Road to Democratic Consolidation?p. 189
Assessing Truth and Justice Policies in Uruguay and Chilep. 191
Conclusionsp. 213
Referencesp. 293
Indexp. 329
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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