Catalogue


Unnatural selection [electronic resource] : the challenges of engineering tomorrow's people /
edited by Peter Healey and Steve Rayner.
imprint
London ; Sterling, VA : Earthscan, 2009.
description
xiv, 273 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1844076229 (hardback), 9781844076222 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
London ; Sterling, VA : Earthscan, 2009.
isbn
1844076229 (hardback)
9781844076222 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Based on a conference entitled "Tomorrow's People: the Challenges of Technologies for Life Extension and Enhancement" which was organized by the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at Oxford University's Saïd Business School and held in Oxford in 2006.
catalogue key
10793668
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [238]-264) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Peter Healey is a Research Fellow at the James Martin Institute, Saiomlet;d Business School, University of Oxford. Steve Rayner is James Martin Professor of Science and Civilization, University of Oxford, a Member of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, and Honorary Professor of Climate Change and Society, University of Copenhagen.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Big changes are coming in every aspect of our lives. Should and will we embrace or reject them? (This) well-chosen collection of short but eye-opening essays will help you decide which choice is made.' Gregory M. Fahy PhD, cryobiologist, biogerontologist and former Director of the American Aging Association'The whole idea of human enhancement divides people. The cautious emphasize the dangers of the techniques themselves, and the social and political consequences of allowing individual choice and commercial interests to prevail. Enthusiasts point out that humans have always striven to enhance human capabilities and extend lifespan. Isn't it unethical not to seek to improve on nature? This book deepens the debate, with perspectives from diverse disciplines and cultures explaining what the technologies are, what they might achieve and the societal consequences on a global scale.'Dr Mairi Levitt, Department of Philosophy, Lancaster University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Should we engineer humans to be stronger, smarter - even immortal? This is a controversial and important topic which raises fundamental ethical questions about evolution, what it is to be human and control over enhancement technologies.
Main Description
With ever-advancing scientific understanding and technological capabilities, humanity stands on the brink of the potential next stage of evolution: evolution engineered by us. Nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science offer the possibility to enhance human performance, lengthen life span and reshape our inherited physical, cognitive and emotional identities. But with this promise come huge risks, complex choices and fundamental ethical questions about evolution, what it is to be human, and about control over, and the distribution of benefits from, new technology. This book, written by a range of experts in science and technology, bioethics and social science, examines the range of technological innovations offering lives that purport to be longer, stronger, smarter and happier and asks whether their introduction is likely to lead to more fulfilled individuals and a fairer world. The breadth of approaches and perspectives make important reading for those who work with these technologies and anyone who cares about the implications of humanity engineering its own evolution.
Main Description
With ever-advancing scientific understanding and technological capabilities, humanity stands on the brink of the potential next stage of evolution: evolution engineered by us. Nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science offer the possibility to enhance human performance, lengthen life-span and reshape our inherited physical, cognitive and emotional identities. But with this promise come huge risks, complex choices and fundamental ethical questions: about evolution; about what it is to be human; and about control over, and the distribution of benefits from, new technology.Written by a range of experts in science, technology, bioethics and social science, Unnatural Selection examines the range of technological innovations offering lives that purport to be longer, stronger, smarter and happier, and asks whether their introduction is likely to lead to more fulfilled individuals and a fairer world. The breadth of approaches and perspectives make important reading for anyone who cares about the implications of humanity engineering its own evolution.
Main Description
'The whole idea of human enhancement divides people. The cautious emphasize the dangers of the techniques themselves, and the social and political consequences of allowing individual choice and commercial interests to prevail. The enthusiasts point out that humans have always striven to enhance human capabilities and extend lifespan. Isn't it unethical not to seek to improve on nature? This book deepens the debate, with perspectives from diverse disciplines and cultures explaining what the technologies are, what they might achieve and the societal consequences on a global scale.' Dr Mairi Levitt, Department of Philosophy, Lancaster University
Table of Contents
List of figures and tablesp. ix
List of contributorsp. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
Introduction
Introductionp. 3
Radical Evolution: An Overview of the Near Futurep. 11
One World Or Several?
Tomorrow's People, Today's Challengesp. 25
Personality Enhancement and Transferp. 32
On 'Life-Enhancing' Technologies and the Democratic Discourse: A South Asian Perspectivep. 40
The Nature Of Human Natures
Beyond Human Naturep. 51
Are Disabled People Human?p. 60
Biotechnology and its Spiritual Oppositionp. 67
Longer?
Understanding Global Ageingp. 77
The Ageing Process: An Evolution in Our Understandingp. 83
Postponing Ageing: Re-identifying the Expertsp. 89
In Pursuit of the Longevity Dividendp. 95
From Ageing Research to Preventive Medicine: Pathways and Obstaclesp. 103
Stronger?
Engineering Challenges to Regenerative Medicinep. 111
Longevity and Regenerationp. 116
Augmenting Human Beingsp. 121
Smarter?
Brain Boostersp. 129
Pharmacological Enhancement of Cognitionp. 142
The Economics of Brain Emulationsp. 150
Happier?
Happier: A Psychopharmacology Perspectivep. 159
What's Your Mission in Life? Why Being Happy Should Not Be Your Priorityp. 167
Fairer?
Enhancement and Fairnessp. 177
Towards a Fairer Distribution of Technology in Maintaining Human Health: An Example of Child Immunization in Western Chinap. 188
Ableism, Enhancement Medicine and the Techno-Poor Disabledp. 196
Governable?
Governance of New and Emerging Science and Technologyp. 209
Governing Our Future Selvesp. 215
Global Population Ageing and the World's Future Human Capitalp. 221
Postscript
Choosing our Biological Futurep. 231
Referencesp. 238
Indexp. 265
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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