Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The space and place of modernism [electronic resource] : the Russian revolution, little magazines, and New York /
Adam McKible.
imprint
New York : Routledge, 2002.
description
xvii, 185 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0415939801 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Routledge, 2002.
isbn
0415939801 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction, The blood and bones of modernism -- "There is a difference between prose and poetry" : the Russian Revolution in the Liberator -- Our (?) country : mapping "these 'colored' United States" in the Messenger -- "You can't go back, they'll cut your throat" : the failure of nostalgia in the Dial -- The exodus of the Little review -- "Beauty in our slaughter-fold" : the Gold-McKay Liberator -- Conclusion, "So interesting and modern...her gesticulating hands show her origin".
general note
Originally presented as the author's thesis (doctoral)--University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1998.
catalogue key
10788468
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 163-179) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
This book examines reactions to the Russian Revolution by four little magazines of the teens and twenties ( The Liberator, The Messenger, The Little Review , and The Dial ) in order to analyze some of the ways modernist writers mediate the competing demands of aesthetics, political commitment and race. Re-examining interconnections among such artificially disparate phenomena as the Harlem Renaissance, Greenwich Village bohemianism, modernism and Leftist politics, this book rightly emphasizes the vitality of little magazines and argues for their necessary place in the study of modernism.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Adam McKible emphasizes the vitality of little magazines during the teens and twenties in New York. He discusses the role they played in enlightening people to the events taking place in Russia as the October Revolution changed aspirations and belief sytems at a local and global level.
Main Description
This book examines reactions to the Russian Revolution by four little magazines of the teens and twenties (The Liberator, The Messenger, The Little Review,andThe Dial) in order to analyze some of the ways modernist writers negotiate the competing demands of aesthetics, political commitment and race. Re-examining interconnections among such superficially disparate phenomena as the Harlem Renaissance, Greenwich Village bohemianism, modernism and Leftist politics, this book rightly emphasizes the vitality of little magazines and argues for their necessary place in the study of modernism.
Main Description
This book examines reactions to the Russian Revolution by four little magazines of the teens and twenties (TheLiberator, The Messenger, The Little Review,and TheDial) in order to analyze some of the ways modernist writers negotiate the competing demands of aesthetics, political commitment and race. Re-examining interconnections among such superficially disparate phenomena as the Harlem Renaissance, Greenwich Village bohemianism, modernism and Leftist politics, this book rightly emphasizes the vitality of little magazines and argues for their necessary place in the study of modernism.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction, The Blood and Bones of Modernism
"There is a difference between prose and poetry": The Russian Revolution in The Liberator
Our (?) Country: Mapping "These 'Colored' United States" in The Messenger
You can't go back, they'll cut your throat:" The Failure of Nostalgia in The Dial
The Exodus of The Little Review
Beauty in Our Slaughter-fold: The Gold-McKay Liberator
Conclusion, "So interesting and modern Her gesticulating hands show her origin"
Notes
Works
Cited Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem