Catalogue


The making of Sir Philip Sidney [electronic resource] /
Edward Berry.
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c1998.
description
xvi, 241 p. : ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802042880 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c1998.
isbn
0802042880 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10768538
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-235) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1998-11:
Berry (Univ. of Victoria, Canada) is concerned not with all of Sidney's poetic "making" (although he treats most of the works), but with the single aspect of Sidney's creation of fictional and biographical images of himself. In eight well-organized chapters, the author examines familial, educational, and cultural forces contributing to Sidney's concern with self-representation; his initial self-representation in letters to Hubert Languet; his unsuccessful attempts to become a courtier-poet at Elizabeth's court; Philisides in Arcadia; the persona of Defence of Poetry; Astrophel in Astrophel and Stella; the figure of Philisides in the revised Arcadia. Although the Tudor period frequently used heightened self-representation, Berry finds remarkable "the number and variety of Sidney's literary self-portraits and the self-consciousness with which he cultivates his literary personas" in a recurrent pattern of a self in continuing crisis, searching for definition and vocation. Berry's assertion that creators of the Sidney legend invented a fictional self "less interesting and perhaps less true" than the fictional selves Sidney had created before them invites a comparison/contrast study of this book with Lisa Klein's The Exemplary Sidney and the Elizabethan Sonneteer (CH, Oct'98). Both Berry and Klein deserve a place in Sidney collections serving students at all levels. Valuable notes. L. M. Tenbusch; emerita, Immaculata College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 1998
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Sir Philip Sidney is one of the most popular and enduring of Elizabethan authors and one most preoccupied with the relationship between self, society, and art. By focusing on the significance of Sidney's self-representations throughout his work, Edward Berry combines biography, social history, and literary criticism to achieve a carefully balanced portrayal of the poet's life and art.
Main Description
Does a poet make himself, or do his culture and his fiction make him? Sir Philip Sidney is one of the most popular and enduring of Elizabethan authors, and one of those most preoccupied with the relationship between self, society, and art. Edward Berry's The Making of Sir Philip Sidneyexplores how Sidney 'made' or created himself as a poet by 'making' representations of himself in the roles of some of his most literary creations: Philisides, Astrophil, and the intrusive persona of the Defence of Poetry. Focusing on the significance of these and other self-representations throughout Sidney's career, Berry combines biography, social history, and literary criticism to achieve a carefully balanced portrayal of the poet's life and work. This is a book that makes a significant contribution to our understanding of Sidney, and is likely to appeal to both students and scholars of Sidney, as well as to those wishing to understand the cultural events that shaped this central figure of the English Renaissance.
Description for Reader
Does a poet make himself, or do his culture and his fiction make him? Sir Philip Sidney is one of the most popular and enduring of Elizabethan authors, and one of those most preoccupied with the relationship between self, society, and art. Edward Berry's The Making of Sir Philip Sidney explores how Sidney 'made' or created himself as a poet by 'making' representations of himself in the roles of some of his most literary creations: Philisides, Astrophil, and the intrusive persona of A Defence of Poetry. Focusing on the significance of these and other self-representations throughout Sidney's career, Berry combines biography, social history, and literary criticism to achieve a carefully balanced portrayal of the poet's life and work. This is a book that makes a significant contribution to our understanding of Sidney, and is likely to appeal to both students and scholars of Sidney, as well as to those wishing to understand the cultural events that shaped this central figure of the English Renaissance.
Description for Reader
Does a poet make himself, or do his culture and his fiction make him? Sir Philip Sidney is one of the most popular and enduring of Elizabethan authors, and one of those most preoccupied with the relationship between self, society, and art.Edward Berry's The Making of Sir Philip Sidney explores how Sidney 'made' or created himself as a poet by 'making' representations of himself in the roles of some of his most literary creations: Philisides, Astrophil, and the intrusive persona of A Defence of Poetry. Focusing on the significance of these and other self-representations throughout Sidney's career, Berry combines biography, social history, and literary criticism to achieve a carefully balanced portrayal of the poet's life and work.This is a book that makes a significant contribution to our understanding of Sidney, and is likely to appeal to both students and scholars of Sidney, as well as to those wishing to understand the cultural events that shaped this central figure of the English Renaissance.
Table of Contents
Preface
Sidney's Life: A Brief Chronology
Imitation and Identityp. 3
Friend to Hubert Languetp. 28
Self-Portrayals at Court, 1575-9p. 49
Philisides in Exile: The Old Arcadiap. 63
Astrophil and the Comedy of Lovep. 102
The Poet as Warrior: A Defence of Poetryp. 142
Philisides in Andromana's Court: The New Arcadiap. 163
The Autobiographical Impulse: Conclusionsp. 192
Notesp. 213
Indexp. 237
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem