Catalogue


Slouching towards Sirte [electronic resource] : NATO's war on Libya and Africa /
Maximilian C. Forte.
imprint
Montréal, Québec: Baraka Books, [2012]
description
341 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
ISBN
9781926824529 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Montréal, Québec: Baraka Books, [2012]
isbn
9781926824529 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10688150
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [309]-338) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Forte's allegations that NATO's war was manufactured by liberal interventionists and 'iPad imperialists' whose agenda to disrupt African independence and execute regime change under the 'fig leaf' of saving lives are chillingand persuasive. . . . Even though Forte couches descriptions of Gaddafi in amorphous, guarded language, he isn't an apologist. In this provocative and unabashedly direct book, Forte speaks truth to power." www.ForewordReviews.com
" Slouching Towards Sirteis a penetrating critique, not only of the NATO intervention in Libya, but of the concept of humanitarian intervention and imperialism in our time. It is the definitive treatment of NATO's war on Libya. It is difficult to imagine it will be surpassed." www.gowans.wordpress.com
Slouching Towards Sirte is a penetrating critique, not only of the NATO intervention in Libya, but of the concept of humanitarian intervention and imperialism in our time. It is the definitive treatment of NATO's war on Libya. It is difficult to imagine it will be surpassed.
"Slouching Towards Sirte is a penetrating critique, not only of the NATO intervention in Libya, but of the concept of humanitarian intervention and imperialism in our time. It is the definitive treatment of NATO's war on Libya. It is difficult to imagine it will be surpassed." Stephen Gowans, What's Left November 9, 2012.
"Slouching Towards Sirte is a penetrating critique, not only of the NATO intervention in Libya, but of the concept of humanitarian intervention and imperialism in our time. It is the definitive treatment of NATO's war on Libya. It is difficult to imagine it will be surpassed." Stephen Gowans, What's Left November 9, 2012. "Forte's allegations that NATO's war was manufactured by liberal interventionists and "iPad imperialists" whose agenda to disrupt African independence and execute regime change under the "fig leaf" of saving lives are chilling-and persuasive. ... Even though Forte couches descriptions of Gaddafi in amorphous, guarded language, he isn't an apologist. In this provocative and unabashedly direct book, Forte speaks truth to power." - Amy O'Loughlin, ForeWord Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
ForeWord Magazine, December 2012
Reference & Research Book News, February 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A comprehensive analysis, this book examines all the justifications and myths about the war on Libya and methodically dismantles them. It delineates the documentary history of events, processes, and decisions that led up to the war while underscoring its resulting consequences. Arguing that NATO's war is part of a larger process of militarizing U.S. relations with Africawhich sees the development of the Pentagon's AFRICOM as being in competition with Pan-African initiativethis account shows that Western relations with a "rehabilitated" Libya were shaky at best, mired in distrust, and exhibiting a preference for regime change.
Main Description
NATO's war in Libya was proclaimed as a humanitarian intervention-bombing in the name of "saving lives." Attempts at diplomacy were stifled. Peace talks were subverted. Libya was barred from representing itself at the UN, where shadowy NGOs and "human rights" groups held full sway in propagating exaggerations, outright falsehoods, and racial fear mongering that served to sanction atrocities and ethnic cleansing in the name of democracy. The rush to war was far speedier than Bush's invasion of Iraq. Max Forte has scrutinized the documentary history from before, during, and after the war. He argues that it was not about human rights, nor entirely about oil, but about a larger process of militarizing U.S. relations with Africa. The development of the Pentagon's AFRICOM is seen to be in competition with Pan-Africanist initiatives such as those spearheaded by Muammar Gaddafi. Far from the success NATO boasts about or the "high watermark" proclaimed by proponents of the "Responsibility to Protect," this war has left the once prosperous, independent and defiant Libya in ruin, dependency and prolonged civil strife.
Main Description
NATO's war in Libya was proclaimed as a humanitarian intervention-bombing in the name of saving lives. Attempts at diplomacy were stifled. Peace talks were subverted. Libya was barred from representing itself at the UN, where shadowy NGOs and human rights groups held full sway in propagating exaggerations, outright falsehoods, and racial fear mongering that served to sanction atrocities and ethnic cleansing in the name of democracy. The rush to war was far speedier than Bush's invasion of Iraq. Max Forte has scrutinized the documentary history from before, during, and after the war. He argues that it was not about human rights, nor entirely about oil, but about a larger process of militarizing U.S. relations with Africa. The development of the Pentagon's AFRICOM is seen to be in competition with Pan-Africanist initiatives such as those spearheaded by Muammar Gaddafi. Far from the success NATO boasts about or the high watermark proclaimed by proponents of the Responsibility to Protect, this war has left the once prosperous, independent and defiant Libya in ruin, dependency and prolonged civil strife.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. 9
Acknowledgmentsp. 14
Abbreviationsp. 15
Introduction: Liberal Imperialism and the New Scramble for Africap. 17
Sirte: Keystone of Independencep. 31
Sirte: Touchstone of Imperialismp. 69
Libyan Pan-Africanism and Its Discontentsp. 137
A War against Africa: AFRICOM, NATO, and Racismp. 187
Humanitarianism and the Invention of Emergencyp. 237
Conclusion: The Aftermath: A New War on Africap. 267
Referencesp. 309
Indexp. 339
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem