Catalogue


The politics and aesthetics of "New Negro" literature /
edited with introductions by Cary D. Wintz.
imprint
New York : Garland Pub., 1996.
description
xiv, 381 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0815322135 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Garland Pub., 1996.
isbn
0815322135 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
1055503
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. xii).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Black writers and intellectuals struggled to articulate an aesthetic for African American literature and to define the appropriate relationship between an African American literary movement and the racial politics of the United States in the 1920s and 1930s. This volume contains examples of the literature of the 1920s-one element of a black cultural movement that included music, art, and theater. These critics explored the Southern and African roots of black culture, and the impact of race and urbanization on the African American experience.
Table of Contents
Series Introduction
Volume Introduction
Ebony and topaz: A Collectaneap. 1
Defining the Harlem Renaissance and Black Literature
The Negro-Art Hokump. 164
The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountainp. 166
Editorial: American Negro Artp. 170
Editorial: Gambling the Lyrep. 172
Editorial: Some Perils of the "Renaissance"p. 174
Characteristics of Negro Expressionp. 175
Harlem Reviewedp. 183
Art, Theater, and Music
A Negro Art Exhibitp. 192
To Certain of Our Phillistinesp. 194
Editorial: Negro Artp. 196
Negro Art Past and Presentp. 198
The Negro Spirituals and American Artp. 202
Editorial: More About African Artp. 205
The Art of the Congop. 206
African Plastic in Contemporary Artp. 208
The Negro in Dramatic Artp. 211
The Negro in the Field of Dramap. 214
Has the Negro a Place in the Theatre?p. 215
A Criticism of the Negro Drama: As It Relates to the Negro Dramatist and Artistp. 216
The Theatre: A Review of Porgyp. 217
The Gift of Laugtherp. 219
The Negro's Cycle of Song - A Reviewp. 227
Self-Portraiture and Social Criticism in Negro Folk-Songp. 230
The Profanation of Negro Spiritualsp. 236
Spirituals and Neo-Spiritualsp. 237
A Folk Culture in the Makingp. 241
Setting the Political Agenda for the Harlem Renaissance
The Dilemma of the Negro Authorp. 247
The Larger Successp. 253
On Writing About Negroesp. 263
A Note on the Sociology of Negro Literaturep. 265
The Advance of the Negrop. 268
The Negro Enters Literaturep. 271
Race Prejudice and the Negro Artistp. 283
The Negro Looks at an Outworn Traditionp. 291
Negro Authors and White Publishersp. 297
Negro Authors Must Eatp. 298
Our Literary Audiencep. 300
The Burden of Credulityp. 306
H.L. Mencken Finds Flowers in a "Dunghill"p. 308
Arts Is Not Enoughp. 311
Claude McKay to Nancy Cunard, September 18, 1932 from Tangier, Moroccop. 317
Claude McKay to Nancy Cunard, September 29, 1932 from Tangier, Moroccop. 319
Writers, Words and the Worldp. 321
Democracy, Negroes, and Writersp. 323
My Adventure as a Social Poetp. 325
A Note on Contempo and Langston Hughesp. 333
The Politics of Publishing - Letters and Memos
Alfred A. Knopf to Langston Hughes, July 29, 1930p. 335
Langston Hughes to Carl Van Vechten, September 4, 1930p. 336
Alfred A. Knopf to Langston Hughes, March 2, 1931p. 337
Carl Van Vechten to Blanche Knopf, April 3, 1933p. 338
Blanche Knopf to Langston Hughes, August 21, 1933p. 339
Langston Hughes to Blanche Knopf, February 27, 1934p. 340
Carl Van Vechten to Blanche Knopf, March 12, 1934p. 341
Blanche Knopf to Langston Hughes, March 12, 1934p. 342
Langston Hughes to Blanche Knopf, nd [1934]p. 343
Memo, HS (Harold Strauss) to Mr. Knopf, March 1, 1940p. 344
Memo, HS (Harold Strauss) to Mrs. Knopf, April 8, 1940p. 345
Langston Hughes to Mrs. Blanche Knopf, February 8, 1940 [from Monterey, California]p. 346
Reader's Report, November 27, 1942, Langston Hughes, The Big Sea, H. Straussp. 348
The Politics of the New Negro
The Negro and Radical Thoughtp. 350
Soviet Russia and the Negrop. 353
Garvey and Garveyism - An Estimatep. 363
The Garvey Movementp. 366
Editorial: Garvey and the "Garvey Movement"p. 370
The Social Philosophy of Booker T. Washingtonp. 372
Acknowledgmentsp. 377
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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