Catalogue


The woman and the hour [electronic resource] : Harriet Martineau and Victorian ideologies /
Caroline Roberts.
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2002.
description
253 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802035965 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2002.
isbn
0802035965 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction: Contexts and Controversies 3 -- 1 Gendered Discourses and a Sociology of Texts: Illustrations of Political Economy (1832-4) 10 -- 2 The Linguistic Structure of American Society 26 -- 3 Realism and Feminism: Deerbrook (1839) 52 -- 4 History and Romance: The Hour and the Man (1841) 76 -- 5 Invalidism, Mesmerism, and the Medical Profession: Life in the Sick-Room (1844) and Letters on Mesmerism (1844) 107 -- 6 History and Religious Faith: Eastern Life, Present and Past (1848) 139 -- 7 Shaking the Faith: Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development (1851) 169 -- Conclusion 193 -- NOTES 197 -- WORKS CITED 233 -- INDEX 247.
catalogue key
10532088
 
Includes bibliographical reference (p. [233]-246) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Caroline Roberts is a Visiting Scholar at the Department of English, University of Toronto.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-12-01:
In taking on this Victorian social critic, novelist, popularizer, and historian, Roberts (Univ. of Toronto) distinguishes herself from previous scholars by eschewing biographical analysis in favor of historicized interpretations of Martineau's most controversial texts. The author divides the main body of the book into seven chapters on individual works and their contemporary reception, beginning with Illustrations of Political Economy (1832-34) and concluding with Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development (1851), which Martineau coauthored with Henry George Atkinson. Martineau had wide-ranging interests--mesmerism, phrenology, historiography, atheism, literary realism--and Roberts touches on these subjects. The book draws from Foucault, but the prose is jargon-free. Roberts is a better interpreter of Martineau's nonfiction prose than of her fiction, and at times the reception histories overwhelm the texts themselves. Moreover, the sheer number of topics under discussion appears to stretch Roberts' own resources, most seriously in the chapter on Martineau's historical novel about Toussaint L'Ouverture, The Hour and the Man (1840): taking Georg Lukacs and Jim Reilly as her theoretical odd couple, Roberts misses nearly all of the key (and directly relevant) scholarship on historical fiction published in recent decades. For graduate collections. M. E. Burstein SUNY College at Brockport
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2002
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Summaries
Description for Reader
Harriet Martineau was a major figure in the Victorian period and a prominent speaker in a number of contemporary cultural debates, including racism, atheism, abolitionism, and the status of women. Her various novels, essays, and articles generated tremendous controversy in their reception as they forced such topics of debate into the public realm. Caroline Roberts's The Woman and the Hourprovides an engaging examination of seven of Martineau's most contentious texts:Illustrations of Political Economy(1832-34),Society in America(1837), Deerbrook(1839), The Hour and the Man(1841), Letters on Mesmerism(1844), Eastern Life, Present and Past(1848), and Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development(1851). Building on the premise that these works serve as an important gauge of prevailing beliefs, opinions, and attitudes in Victorian society, Roberts situates Martineau's writing in its historical context and presents a sophisticated scholarly analysis of their predominantly hostile reception. Moreover, Roberts integrates close readings with meticulous archival research of periodical reviews, offering a valuable resource and stimulus for both the literary critic and the cultural historian.
Main Description
Harriet Martineau was a major figure in the Victorian period and a prominent speaker in a number of contemporary cultural debates, including racism, atheism, abolitionism, and the status of women. Her various novels, essays, and articles generated tremendous controversy in their reception as they forced such topics of debate into the public realm. Caroline Roberts's The Woman and the Hour provides an engaging examination of seven of Martineau's most contentious texts: Illustrations of Political Economy (1832-34), Society in America (1837), Deerbrook (1839), The Hour and the Man (1841), Letters on Mesmerism (1844), Eastern Life, Present and Past (1848), and Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development (1851). Building on the premise that these works serve as an important gauge of prevailing beliefs, opinions, and attitudes in Victorian society, Roberts situates Martineau's writing in its historical context and presents a sophisticated scholarly analysis of their predominantly hostile reception. Moreover, Roberts integrates close readings with meticulous archival research of periodical reviews, offering a valuable resource and stimulus for both the literary critic and the cultural historian.
Description for Reader
Harriet Martineau was a major figure in the Victorian period and a prominent speaker in a number of contemporary cultural debates, including racism, atheism, abolitionism, and the status of women. Her various novels, essays, and articles generated tremendous controversy in their reception as they forced such topics of debate into the public realm.Caroline Roberts's The Woman and the Hourprovides an engaging examination of seven of Martineau's most contentious texts:Illustrations of Political Economy(1832-34),Society in America(1837), Deerbrook(1839), The Hour and the Man(1841), Letters on Mesmerism(1844), Eastern Life, Present and Past(1848), and Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development(1851). Building on the premise that these works serve as an important gauge of prevailing beliefs, opinions, and attitudes in Victorian society, Roberts situates Martineau's writing in its historical context and presents a sophisticated scholarly analysis of their predominantly hostile reception. Moreover, Roberts integrates close readings with meticulous archival research of periodical reviews, offering a valuable resource and stimulus for both the literary critic and the cultural historian.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Contexts and Controversiesp. 3
Gendered Discourses and a Sociology of Texts: Illustrations of Political Economy (1832-4)p. 10
The Linguistic Structure of American Societyp. 26
Realism and Feminism: Deerbrook (1839)p. 52
History and Romance: The Hour and the Man (1841)p. 76
Invalidism, Mesmerism, and the Medical Profession: Life in the Sick-Room (1844) and Letters on Mesmerism (1844)p. 107
History and Religious Faith: Eastern Life, Present and Past (1848)p. 139
Shaking the Faith: Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development (1851)p. 169
Conclusionp. 193
Notesp. 197
Works Citedp. 233
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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