Catalogue


Taking responsibility for children [electronic resource] /
Samantha Brennan and Robert Noggle, editors.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2007.
description
xxi, 184 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1554580153 (pbk.), 9781554580156 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press, c2007.
isbn
1554580153 (pbk.)
9781554580156 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Taking responsibility for children / Robert Noggle, Samantha Brennan -- Raising children: who is responsible for what? / Colin M. Macleod -- Parental responsibility / Jan Narveson -- Children, caregivers, friends / Amy Mullin -- Parent licensing and the protection of children / Mark C. Vopat -- Responsibility and children's rights: the case for restricting parental smoking / Samantha Brennan, Angela White -- Political liberalism and moral education: reflections on Mozert v. Hawkins / Marc Ramsay -- Education in a liberal society: implications of Ross / Karen Wendling -- Could there be a right not to be born an octuplet? / Laura M. Purdy
abstract
"What do we as a society, and as parents in particular, owe to our children? Each chapter in Taking Responsibility for Children offers part of an answer to that question. Although the contributors vary in the approaches they take and the conclusions they draw, each one explores some aspect of the moral obligations owed to children by their caregivers. Some focus primarily on the responsibilities of parents, while others focus on the role of society and government." "Taking Responsibility for Children will be of interest to philosophers, advocates for children's interests, and those interested in public policy, especially as it relates to children and families."--BOOK JACKET.
catalogue key
10528704
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 169-175) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Samantha Brennan is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Western Ontario. Her main research interest is contemporary normative ethics and she is also interested in feminist moral and political philosophy. She has written numerous papers on moral rights and, with Robert Noggle, some on children's rights. Robert Noggle is a professor of philosophy in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at the University of Central Michigan. His research interests include the relationship between moral theory and the nature of persons, personal autonomy, and the moral and political status of children. His most recent publications include "Special Agents: Children's Autonomy and Parental Authority" (in The Moral and Political Status of Children, edited by David Archard and Colin M. Macleod, 2002).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-07-01:
Brennan (Western Ontario) and Noggle (Central Michigan) bring together diverse contemporary philosophers in this volume that examines the philosophical implications of the child/guardian relationship. Among the topics considered are obligations of care, feminist considerations of mothering, procreative licensing, and moral/religious education. The essays migrate from the purely theoretical to the applied considerations of parental smoking bans or a child's purported right "not to be born an octuplet." This volume is geared toward readers who are versed in ethical and political theories, though at times the level is uneven, with foundational terms being explained in depth and more obscure allusions left unexplained. At their best, the contributions are wonderful (the chapters on mothering and parental smoking are excellent); at their worst, they get bogged down into tedious legalistic readings (the two chapters on educational issues). This work is part of a series focusing on childhood and families in Canada; however, with the exception of a single chapter, it has no explicit Canadian focus. In addition to courses in applied ethics, this volume would be at home in philosophically oriented gender studies, sociology, or education classes. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above. R. E. Kraft York College of Pennsylvania
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
What do we as a society, and as parents in particular, owe to our children? Each chapter in this book offers part of an answer to that question. Although the contributors vary in the approaches they take and the conclusions they draw, each one explores some aspect of the moral obligations owed to children by their caregivers. Some focus primarily on the re-sponsibilities of parents, while others focus on the role of society and government. The essays reflect a mix of concern with the practical and the philo-sophical aspects of taking responsibility for children, addressing such topics as the limits and extent of parental obligation, the nature and extent of the rights and entitlements of children, the responsibility of the state to protect children, the role and nature of public education in a liberal society, the best ways to ensure adequate child protection, the question of whether we should license parents, the conflicts over children's religious education, and questions about children's health. "Taking Responsibility for Children" will be of interest to philosophers, advocates for children's interests, and those interested in public policy, especially as it relates to children and families.
Main Description
What do we as a society, and as parents in particular, owe to our children? Each chapter in Taking Responsibility for Childrenoffers part of an answer to that question. Although they vary in the approaches they take and the conclusions they draw, each contributor explores some aspect of the moral obligations owed to children by their caregivers. Some focus primarily on the responsibilities of parents, while others focus on the responsibilities of society and government.The essays reflect a mix of concern with the practical and the philosophical aspects of taking responsibility for children, addressing such topics as parental obligations, the rights and entitlements of children, the responsibility of the state, the role and nature of public education in a liberal society, the best ways to ensure adequate child protection, the licensing of parents, children's religious education, and children's health. Taking Responsibility for Childrenwill be of interest to philosophers, advocates for children's interests, and those interested in public policy, especially as it relates to children and families.
Main Description
What do we as a society, and as parents in particular, owe to our children? Each chapter in Taking Responsibility for Children offers part of an answer to that question. Although they vary in the approaches they take and the conclusions they draw, each contributor explores some aspect of the moral obligations owed to children by their caregivers. Some focus primarily on the responsibilities of parents, while others focus on the responsibilities of society and government. The essays reflect a mix of concern with the practical and the philosophical aspects of taking responsibility for children, addressing such topics as parental obligations, the rights and entitlements of children, the responsibility of the state, the role and nature of public education in a liberal society, the best ways to ensure adequate child protection, the licensing of parents, children's religious education, and children's health. Taking Responsibility for Children will be of interest to philosophers, advocates for children's interests, and those interested in public policy, especially as it relates to children and families.
Bowker Data Service Summary
With a variety of approaches and reaching different conclusions, each contributor explores the moral obligations caretakers owe to the children for whom they are responsible.
Main Description
What do we as a society, and as parents in particular, owe to our children? Each chapter in Taking Responsibility for Children offers part of an answer to that question. Although they vary in the approaches they take and the conclusions they draw, each contributor explores some aspect of the moral obligations owed to children by their caregivers. Some focus primarily on the responsibilities of parents, while others focus on the responsibilities of society and government.The essays reflect a mix of concern with the practical and the philosophical aspects of taking responsibility for children, addressing such topics as parental obligations, the rights and entitlements of children, the responsibility of the state, the role and nature of public education in a liberal society, the best ways to ensure adequate child protection, the licensing of parents, children's religious education, and children's health. Taking Responsibility for Children will be of interest to philosophers, advocates for children's interests, and those interested in public policy, especially as it relates to children and families.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Introduction Taking Responsibility for Childrenp. ix
Raising Children: Who Is Responsible for What?p. 1
Parental Responsibilityp. 19
Children, Caregivers, Friendsp. 47
Parent Licensing and the Protection of Childrenp. 73
Responsibility and Children's Rights: The Case for Restricting Parental Smokingp. 97
Political Liberalism and Moral Education: Reflections on Mozert v. Hawkinsp. 113
Education in a Liberal Society: Implications of Rossp. 139
Could There Be a Right Not to Be Born an Octuplet?p. 157
Bibliographyp. 169
Notes on Contributorsp. 177
Indexp. 179
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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