Catalogue


Strangers among us [electronic resource] /
David Woodman.
imprint
Montreal, Que. : McGill-Queen's University Press, c1995.
description
xvi, 166 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0773513485 :
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Montreal, Que. : McGill-Queen's University Press, c1995.
isbn
0773513485 :
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10527870
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-03:
Charles Francis Hall, a private American explorer, went looking in 1868 for any Canadian Inuit who might have encountered survivors of Sir John Franklin's fatal Royal Navy expedition in search of the then-elusive Northwest Passage. Hall interviewed several Inuit hunters, and the records of these interviews have survived in the Naval History Section, Smithsonian Institution, Washington. Woodman has sifted through a vast body of documentation with the abilities of a Sherlock Holmes. He demonstrates that previously misunderstood tales of white men traveling through Inuit lands can mean only one thing: these wanderers were survivors of the Franklin expedition. The last to survive were Captain Crozier and a sailor. This is not an easy tale to tell; to the uninitiated this book will be a puzzle, but all serious students of the Franklin search will have to consult it. Careful documentation, an appendix of Inuit terms and place names, a good bibliography, and a serviceable index add to the value of this book. B. M. Gough; Wilfrid Laurier University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1996
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Summaries
Main Description
In 1868 American explorer Charles Francis Hall interviewed several Inuit hunters who spoke of strangers travelling through their land. Hall immediately jumped to the conclusion that the hunters were talking about survivors of the Franklin expedition and set off for the Melville Peninsula, the location of many of the sightings, to collect further stories and evidence to support his supposition. His theory, however, was roundly dismissed by historians of his day, who concluded that the Inuit had been referring to other white explorers, despite significant discrepancies between the Inuit evidence and the records of other expeditions. In Strangers Among Us Woodman re-examines the Inuit tales in light of modern scholarship and concludes that Hall's initial conclusions are supported by Inuit remembrances, remembrances that do not correlate with other expeditions but are consistent with Franklin's.
Unpaid Annotation
In 1868 American explorer Charles Francis Hall interviewed several Inuit hunters who spoke of strangers travelling through their land. Hall immediately assumed that the hunters were talking about survivors of the Franklin expedition and set off for the Melville Peninsula, the location of many of the sightings, to collect further evidence to support his theory. Hall's theory was roundly dismissed by historians of his day, who concluded that the Inuit had been referring to other white explorers, despite significant discrepancies between the Inuit evidence and the records of other expeditions. In Strangers Among Us Woodman re-examines the Inuit accounts in light of modern scholarship and concludes that Hall's initial conclusions are supported by Inuit remembrances, remembrances that do not correlate with the travels of other expeditions but are consistent with those of Franklin's.
Table of Contents
Maps and Illustrations
Author's Note
Preface
Acknowledgments
Kia and Raep. 3
The Etkerlinp. 49
Homeward Boundp. 94
Conclusionp. 130
Appendix: Inuit Terms and Place Namesp. 137
Notesp. 141
Bibliographyp. 157
Indexp. 163
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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