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Stateliest measures [electronic resource] : Tennyson and the literature of Greece and Rome /
A.A. Markley.
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2004.
description
x, 238 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802089372 (bound : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2004.
isbn
0802089372 (bound : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
language note
Some text in Latin.
catalogue key
10527598
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [197]-221) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-07-01:
In exploring Tennyson's techniques and purposes in recasting classical material, Markley (Pennsylvania State Univ., Delaware County) studies Tennyson's personal library to show what the poet read and when; his use of ancient sources and his innovations; his poetic technique and themes; and the publication histories of some poems (appearances in popular periodicals, order of the poems in first book editions), as that information bears on the works' meanings. These meanings, not surprisingly, include Tennyson's determination "to serve the Crown" and "spiritually nourish his readership." Markley's critical accounts lead him to arrive at the unsurprising conclusion that Tennyson's classical poems ultimately reaffirm "faith" and attest to his belief in "a kinder, more modern Christianity." Other scholars--e.g., Frank Turner (The Greek Heritage in Victorian Britain, 1981) and Richard Jenkyns (The Victorians and Ancient Greece, CH, Jan'81)--have called attention to the importance of classicism in the period's culture, but recent studies of Tennyson and Victorian poetry generally are more likely to pursue the sociopolitical themes (as Isobel Armstrong does in Victorian Poetry: Poetry, Poetics, and Politics, 1993). So in reaffirming traditional moral themes and situating Tennyson's poems in the context of their first publication, Markley makes a worthy contribution to the literature. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. T. Hoagwood Texas A&M University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2005
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Summaries
Description for Reader
The great nineteenth-century English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson received an unusually thorough education in the classical languages, and he remained an active classical scholar throughout his lifetime. His intimate knowledge of both Greek and Latin literature left an indelible stamp on his poetry, both in terms of the sound and rhythm of his verses and in the themes that inspired him. Stateliest Measures, the first full-length study of Tennyson's thematic and metrical uses of classical material, examines the profoundly important role that his classical background played as he fashioned himself into a poet in the 1820s and 30s, and as he defined himself as poet laureate as of 1850. A.A. Markley examines Tennyson's objectives in developing the classical dramatic monologue, which, together with In Memoriamand his experiments with classical meters, indicate the degree to which he patterned himself after the Roman poet Virgil in attempting to provide modern Britain with a literature worthy of a new and rapidly expanding world empire. Stateliest Measuresdemonstrates that Tennyson's engagement with the long-running and complex nineteenth-century debates concerning Hellenism, Imperialism, and modern British culture was much more profound than his critics have recognized.
Description for Reader
The great nineteenth-century English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson received an unusually thorough education in the classical languages, and he remained an active classical scholar throughout his lifetime. His intimate knowledge of both Greek and Latin literature left an indelible stamp on his poetry, both in terms of the sound and rhythm of his verses and in the themes that inspired him. Stateliest Measures, the first full-length study of Tennyson's thematic and metrical uses of classical material, examines the profoundly important role that his classical background played as he fashioned himself into a poet in the 1820s and 30s, and as he defined himself as poet laureate as of 1850.A.A. Markley examines Tennyson's objectives in developing the classical dramatic monologue, which, together with In Memoriam and his experiments with classical meters, indicate the degree to which he patterned himself after the Roman poet Virgil in attempting to provide modern Britain with a literature worthy of a new and rapidly expanding world empire. Stateliest Measures demonstrates that Tennyson's engagement with the long-running and complex nineteenth-century debates concerning Hellenism, Imperialism, and modern British culture was much more profound than his critics have recognized.
Main Description
The great nineteenth-century English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson received an unusually thorough education in the classical languages, and he remained an active classical scholar throughout his lifetime. His intimate knowledge of both Greek and Latin literature left an indelible stamp on his poetry, both in terms of the sound and rhythm of his verses and in the themes that inspired him. Stateliest Measures , the first full-length study of Tennyson's thematic and metrical uses of classical material, examines the profoundly important role that his classical background played as he fashioned himself into a poet in the 1820s and 30s, and as he defined himself as poet laureate as of 1850. A.A. Markley examines Tennyson's objectives in developing the classical dramatic monologue, which, together with In Memoriam and his experiments with classical meters, indicate the degree to which he patterned himself after the Roman poet Virgil in attempting to provide modern Britain with a literature worthy of a new and rapidly expanding world empire. Stateliest Measures demonstrates that Tennyson's engagement with the long-running and complex nineteenth-century debates concerning Hellenism, Imperialism, and modern British culture was much more profound than his critics have recognized.
Table of Contents
Introduction : the English Virgilp. 3
Tennyson's classicism in context : the Victorians and the ancient worldp. 13
The building blocks of song : constructing the classical dramatic monologuep. 41
Et in Arcadia : transcending the classical elegy in In memoriamp. 70
Classical prosody and the 'ocean roll of rhythm'p. 87
The trilogy on death : 'Ulysses,' 'Tithonus,' and 'Tiresias'p. 121
Old tales for a new day : Lucretius, Demeter, and OEnone's returnp. 140
Tables of contents of the first editions of Tennyson's works discussed in this studyp. 165
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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