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Soldiers of diplomacy [electronic resource] : the United Nations, peacekeeping, and the new world order /
Jocelyn Coulon ; translated by Phyllis Aronoff and Howard Scott.
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c1998.
description
xi, 231 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802008992 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
geographic term
corporate subject
More Details
uniform title
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c1998.
isbn
0802008992 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
10527105
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [221]-223) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-09:
Coulon's monograph, an updated and translated version of a work first published in French five years ago, details the evolving role of United Nations peacekeeping since the end of the Cold War. Its primary strengths are its unique and original source material, drawn from extensive 1993 interviews with mission participants at all levels from twelve countries and seven peacekeeping missions. These interview data render the work not only insightful and analytic but also quite a pleasure to read, since so many of the arguments are supported with anecdotal illustrations. Structurally, the book provides a brief history of UN peacekeeping missions during the Cold War period, before proceeding to its main focus--detailed case studies of recent UN operations in Cambodia, Western Sahara, Somalia, and Bosnia. The concluding chapters tackle larger issues such as the pursuit of UN versus great power interests, the debate over a standing UN peacekeeping army, and the lessons to be learned from recent peacekeeping challenges and failures. Useful appendixes chart UN peacekeeping missions through late 1994 and provide the text of relevant sections of the UN Charter. Recommended for all levels. W. W. Newmann; Virginia Commonwealth University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Coulon is one of those rare Canadian journalists (perhaps the only one) who has toured the world visiting the various peacekeeping operations in order to study the problems encountered by Blue Helmets in the field. He has a profound understanding of the mechanisms that direct their operations from UN Headquarters in New York, and he manages to communicate international problems of unimaginable complexity to his readers using remarkably simple terms.'
'Jocelyn Coulon leads us through a complex global situation that is becoming increasingly difficult to control by methods that seem passT before they have grown old.' [Translation
'The book appeals to a wide audience. The writing is clear and reads like a lively, well-documented news story that explores the lived reality of the Blue Helmets. Among the few books in French that have recently been published on the subject, this book is both an excellent introduction and a valuable working resource.' [Translation
This item was reviewed in:
Globe & Mail, January 1999
Books in Canada, April 1999
Choice, September 1999
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Reader
United Nations peacekeeping troops, or 'Blue Helmets,' were first deployed in 1956 to oversee the withdrawal of French, British, and Israeli forces from the Suez Canal. Canadian Lester B. Pearson was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize the following year for proposing this solution to the Suez crisis. Now forty years later, United Nations peacekeepers play a very different role from that of Pearson's lightly armed 'soldier-diplomats.' In June 1997, there were only seven UN missions in which the Blue Helmets were acting as true peacekeepers; another ten missions placed the Blue Helmets in civil conflicts where their roles ranged from evacuating threatened groups to organizing elections, and their tasks were much more dangerous.Jocelyn Coulon draws his experiences visiting nine peacekeeping missions, including Cambodia, Bosnia, and Somalia, at a pivotal point in UN history, when the UN troops were increasingly acting as warriors of a new world order. He raises important questions: How can the UN distinguish its objectives from the interests of the great powers? Could - and should - the UN maintain an independent army? How can the pitfalls encountered by the peacekeepers in Somalia and Bosnia be avoided? Finally, Coulon urges a return to the original, though less spectacular, role of the UN soldiers: keeping the peace where peace is really the goal of the parties involved.Soldiers of Diplomacywas first published in French in 1994; this new English edition has been updated to reflect recent events. The result of interviews with dozens of soldiers, officers, and officials involved in peacekeeping activities, it is a unique and thought-provoking investigation of UN peacekeeping.
Description for Reader
United Nations peacekeeping troops, or 'Blue Helmets,' were first deployed in 1956 to oversee the withdrawal of French, British, and Israeli forces from the Suez Canal. Canadian Lester B. Pearson was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize the following year for proposing this solution to the Suez crisis. Now forty years later, United Nations peacekeepers play a very different role from that of Pearson's lightly armed 'soldier-diplomats.' In June 1997, there were only seven UN missions in which the Blue Helmets were acting as true peacekeepers; another ten missions placed the Blue Helmets in civil conflicts where their roles ranged from evacuating threatened groups to organizing elections, and their tasks were much more dangerous. Jocelyn Coulon draws his experiences visiting nine peacekeeping missions, including Cambodia, Bosnia, and Somalia, at a pivotal point in UN history, when the UN troops were increasingly acting as warriors of a new world order. He raises important questions: How can the UN distinguish its objectives from the interests of the great powers? Could - and should - the UN maintain an independent army? How can the pitfalls encountered by the peacekeepers in Somalia and Bosnia be avoided? Finally, Coulon urges a return to the original, though less spectacular, role of the UN soldiers: keeping the peace where peace is really the goal of the parties involved. Soldiers of Diplomacywas first published in French in 1994; this new English edition has been updated to reflect recent events. The result of interviews with dozens of soldiers, officers, and officials involved in peacekeeping activities, it is a unique and thought-provoking investigation of UN peacekeeping.
Main Description
United Nations peacekeeping troops, or 'Blue Helmets,' were first deployed in 1956 to oversee the withdrawal of French, British, and Israeli forces from the Suez Canal. Canadian Lester B. Pearson was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize the following year for proposing this solution to the Suez crisis. Now forty years later, United Nations peacekeepers play a very different role from that of Pearson's lightly armed 'soldier-diplomats.' In June 1997, there were only seven UN missions in which the Blue Helmets were acting as true peacekeepers; another ten missions placed the Blue Helmets in civil conflicts where their roles ranged from evacuating threatened groups to organizing elections, and their tasks were much more dangerous. Jocelyn Coulon draws his experiences visiting nine peacekeeping missions, including Cambodia, Bosnia, and Somalia, at a pivotal point in UN history, when the UN troops were increasingly acting as warriors of a new world order. He raises important questions: How can the UN distinguish its objectives from the interests of the great powers? Could - and should - the UN maintain an independent army? How can the pitfalls encountered by the peacekeepers in Somalia and Bosnia be avoided? Finally, Coulon urges a return to the original, though less spectacular, role of the UN soldiers: keeping the peace where peace is really the goal of the parties involved. Soldiers of Diplomacy was first published in French in 1994; this new English edition has been updated to reflect recent events. The result of interviews with dozens of soldiers, officers, and officials involved in peacekeeping activities, it is a unique and thought-provoking investigation of UN peacekeeping.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Rebirth of the United Nationsp. 1
In the Glass Towerp. 3
A Nobel Prize for Canadap. 18
The Peacekeeping Missionsp. 29
The Soldier-Diplomatp. 31
Cambodia: The Fairies around the Cradlep. 41
Sabotage and Betrayal in Western Saharap. 56
The New Warriorsp. 71
Murder in Somaliap. 88
The Unhappy Warriorsp. 101
Obstruction by the Great Powersp. 119
An Army for the UNp. 133
Peacekeeping Takes a Back Seat to Politicsp. 135
A Huge Lego Setp. 145
Pressure from the Frenchp. 153
Epiloguep. 169
United Nations Peacekeeping Missions to 1 September 1994p. 197
Excerpts from the Charter of the United Nationsp. 204
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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