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Smoke and mirrors [electronic resource] : globalized terrorism and the illusion of multilateral security /
Frank P. Harvey.
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2004.
description
ix, 342 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802089488 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2004.
isbn
0802089488 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgments xi -- Abbreviations xiii -- Introduction: Transformation and Complexity: Predicting Global -- Security after 9/11 3 -- Objectives and Overview 7 -- Outline 8 -- 1 Linking Globalism, Terrorism, and Proliferation 11 -- SECTION I: GLOBALISM, SECURITY, AND TERRORISM: COMPLEXITY -- AND CONFUSION 13 -- Globalism and Security 13 -- Globalism and Terrorism 15 -- Terrorism and Globalism 18 -- SECTION II: GLOBALISM AND PROLIFERATION: STRATEGIC -- STABILITY IN TRANSITION 19 -- Strategic Stability: Continuity and Change 21 -- Globalism and the Diminishing Relevance of Vertical Proliferation 27 -- SECTION III: SUMMARY AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS 29 -- 2 Linking Globalism, Unilateralism, and Multilateralism 33 -- Conventional Wisdom 33 -- Unilateralist Response 36 -- Multilateralist Reply and Unilateralist Rejoinder 42 -- Summary and Policy Implications 46 -- Unilateral-Multilateral Continuum(s): Measurement Errors -- and Correctives 49 -- Crucial Case Studies: Gulf War II and Ballistic Missile Defence 62 -- 3 Gulf War II: Unilateralism and Multilateralism in Practice 64 -- French and Russian Unilateralism (a.k.a.Dishonest -- Multilateralism) 65 -- Horse Trading: The Unilateral Self-Interests of Smaller Powers 68 -- American Multilateralism in Iraq 71 -- Unilateralism as a Prerequisite for Multilateralism 74 -- Multilateralism as an Impediment to Successful Coercive -- Diplomacy 77 -- European and American Differences: Illusions and Realities 79 -- 4 WMD Proliferation: The Case for Unilateral Ballistic Missile -- Defence 82 -- Demise of Arms Control and Disarmament 83 -- Automatic Proliferation by Russia 87 -- Automatic Proliferation by China 91 -- The Myth of an American First-Strike Advantage 96 -- Technological Limitations of BMD Interceptors 98 -- Financial and Political Costs 113 -- Powerful Influence of the U.S.Military Industrial Complex (MIC) 120 -- Exaggerated Rogue Threats from Rational Rogue Leaders 123 -- Conclusion: Critical Biases 130 -- 5 WMD Proliferation: The Case against Multilateral Arms Control -- and Disarmament 135 -- Burden(s) of Proof 135 -- Measuring NACD's Successes and Failures 138 -- The Myth of Multilateral Alternatives to BMD 142 -- European Unilateral Self-Interests and Priorities 157 -- Conclusion: A Fait Accompli 161 -- 6 The Inevitability of Terrorism, and American Unilateralism: -- Security Trumps Economics 164 -- The Inevitability of High-Impact Terrorism: Globalism and the -- Privatization of War 166 -- The Inevitability of Unilateralism: Domestic Determinants and -- Pressures 171 -- Lontents ix -- The Inevitability of Unilateralism: External Determinants and -- Pressures 176 -- Prioritizing Unilateral Arms Control and 'Discriminate Deterrence' 179 -- Prioritizing Pre-emption 181 -- 7 The Moral Foundations of Canadian Multilateralism: Distinction -- Trumps Security 185 -- SECTION I: CANADA'S DISHONEST MULTILATERALISM 185 -- Dishonest Commitments to Multilateral Security and Defence 186 -- Dishonest Commitments to Multilateral Aid and Development 188 -- Dishonest Evaluations of BMD and Multilateral Arms Control 191 -- SECTION II: CANADA'S UNPRINCIPLED (HYPER-) MULTILATERALISM -- IN IRAQ, 2003 193 -- Selective Opposition to Regime Change 193 -- Periodic (and Selective) Support for Multilateral Consensus 196 -- Canada's Subordination and Subservience to Hyper- -- Multilateralism 201 -- Sporadic Reliance on Public Opinion 204 -- The Myth of Domestic Political Constraints 205 -- Dishonest Denials of Canada's Contribution to Multilateral -- Intervention in Iraq 206 -- Canada's Uncompromising Compromise and the Illusion of -- Middle-Power Mediation 208 -- Conclusion 214 -- 8 Recalibrating Canada's Moral and Diplomatic Compass 216 -- The Mounting Costs of Privileging 'Distinction' over 'Security' 216 -- Terrorism, Unipolarity, and Canadian Values and Interests 220 -- Proliferation, Missile Defence, and Canadian Values and -- Interests 223 -- Canada-U.S.Relations: Revisiting First Principles after 9/11 227 -- Appendix A: American Multilateralism in Iraq, 2003 233 -- Appendix B: U.S.Legislation Related to 11 September 2001 250 -- Notes 257 -- Bibliography 307 -- Index 331

Library of Congress Subject Headings for this publication: United States Foreign relations 2001-United States Military policy, National security United States, Terrorism Political aspects United States, Globalization Political aspects United States, War on Terrorism, 2001-Security, International, Canada Military policy, âEtats-Unis Relations extâerieures 2001-Sâecuritâe nationale âEtats-Unis, Terrorisme Aspect politique âEtats-Unis, Sâecuritâe internationale, Canada Politique militaire.
catalogue key
10526876
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Frank P. Harvey is a professor in the Department of Political Science and the director of the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies at Dalhousie University.
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Donner Prize, CAN, 2005 : Nominated
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Reader
The threat of terrorism has become a fact of life for American citizens and, by extension, an important issue for current and future U.S. governments. International relations are inevitably affected by this situation, yet allies of the United States have of late been decrying the Bush administration's move toward unilateralism and its sceptical attitude toward multilateral approaches to security. In Smoke and Mirrors, Frank P. Harvey mounts a powerful case for American unilateralism by exposing the real costs, potential risks, and catastrophic failures of multilateral alternatives, that are rarely acknowledged by proponents. He addresses the relationship between globalization, terrorism, and unilateralism, and provides a systematic explanation for, and defence of, Washington's response to threats of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The reality of an increasingly fragile national security environment will impose tremendous pressure on Republican and Democratic leaders alike, and will compel American officials to prioritize safety, protection, and invulnerability above all else in an effort to become self-reliant in matters of security. Harvey develops his arguments with evidence from two significant case studies: the American ballistic missile defence program and the 2003 war in Iraq. He argues that, as the costs and risks of relying exclusively on multilateralism increase, the logical, legal, strategic, and moral reasons for embracing only multilateral approaches to security are becoming more tenuous. The implications for Canada and Europe are obvious. As the U.S. becomes more threatened, the pressures that drive American unilateralism will clash with the foreign, economic, and security policies of other powers, including traditional allies, themselves motivated by a competing set of unilateral self-interests. Smoke and Mirrorswill compel critics of the Bush administration to move beyond the assumption that American foreign policies are temporary in nature. Indeed, the tensions caused by terrorism and proliferation will continue to shape Washington's threat perceptions and responses for decades. The book challenges critics to demonstrate the successes A? as distinct from the promises A? of multilateral security and to prove that their preferred alternative has achieved the victories that would justify a sweeping rejection of unilateralism.
Description for Reader
The threat of terrorism has become a fact of life for American citizens and, by extension, an important issue for current and future U.S. governments. International relations are inevitably affected by this situation, yet allies of the United States have of late been decrying the Bush administration's move toward unilateralism and its sceptical attitude toward multilateral approaches to security.In Smoke and Mirrors, Frank P. Harvey mounts a powerful case for American unilateralism by exposing the real costs, potential risks, and catastrophic failures of multilateral alternatives, that are rarely acknowledged by proponents. He addresses the relationship between globalization, terrorism, and unilateralism, and provides a systematic explanation for, and defence of, Washington's response to threats of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The reality of an increasingly fragile national security environment will impose tremendous pressure on Republican and Democratic leaders alike, and will compel American officials to prioritize safety, protection, and invulnerability above all else in an effort to become self-reliant in matters of security.Harvey develops his arguments with evidence from two significant case studies: the American ballistic missile defence program and the 2003 war in Iraq. He argues that, as the costs and risks of relying exclusively on multilateralism increase, the logical, legal, strategic, and moral reasons for embracing only multilateral approaches to security are becoming more tenuous. The implications for Canada and Europe are obvious. As the U.S. becomes more threatened, the pressures that drive American unilateralism will clash with the foreign, economic, and security policies of other powers, including traditional allies, themselves motivated by a competing set of unilateral self-interests.Smoke and Mirrors will compel critics of the Bush administration to move beyond the assumption that American foreign policies are temporary in nature. Indeed, the tensions caused by terrorism and proliferation will continue to shape Washington's threat perceptions and responses for decades. The book challenges critics to demonstrate the successes ? as distinct from the promises ? of multilateral security and to prove that their preferred alternative has achieved the victories that would justify a sweeping rejection of unilateralism.
Main Description
The threat of terrorism has become a fact of life for American citizens and, by extension, an important issue for current and future U.S. governments. International relations are inevitably affected by this situation, yet allies of the United States have of late been decrying the Bush administration's move toward unilateralism and its sceptical attitude toward multilateral approaches to security. In Smoke and Mirrors , Frank P. Harvey mounts a powerful case for American unilateralism by exposing the real costs, potential risks, and catastrophic failures of multilateral alternatives, that are rarely acknowledged by proponents. He addresses the relationship between globalization, terrorism, and unilateralism, and provides a systematic explanation for, and defence of, Washington's response to threats of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The reality of an increasingly fragile national security environment will impose tremendous pressure on Republican and Democratic leaders alike, and will compel American officials to prioritize safety, protection, and invulnerability above all else in an effort to become self-reliant in matters of security. Harvey develops his arguments with evidence from two significant case studies: the American ballistic missile defence program and the 2003 war in Iraq. He argues that, as the costs and risks of relying exclusively on multilateralism increase, the logical, legal, strategic, and moral reasons for embracing only multilateral approaches to security are becoming more tenuous. The implications for Canada and Europe are obvious. As the U.S. becomes more threatened, the pressures that drive American unilateralism will clash with the foreign, economic, and security policies of other powers, including traditional allies, themselves motivated by a competing set of unilateral self-interests. Smoke and Mirrors will compel critics of the Bush administration to move beyond the assumption that American foreign policies are temporary in nature. Indeed, the tensions caused by terrorism and proliferation will continue to shape Washington's threat perceptions and responses for decades. The book challenges critics to demonstrate the successes - as distinct from the promises - of multilateral security and to prove that their preferred alternative has achieved the victories that would justify a sweeping rejection of unilateralism.
Unpaid Annotation
Frank P. Harvey mounts a powerful case for American unilateralism. He addresses the relationship between globalization, terrorism, and unilateralism, and provides a systematic explanation for, and defense of, Washington's response to threats of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.
Unpaid Annotation
The threat of terrorism has become a fact of life for American citizens and, by extension, an important issue for the current and any future U.S. government. International relations are inevitably affected by this fact, yet allies of the U.S. have of late been decrying the Bush Administration's move toward unilateralism and sceptical attitude towards multilateral approaches to security. In Smoke and Mirrors, Frank P. Harvey mounts a powerful case for American unilateralism by exposing the real costs, potential risks, and catastrophic failures of multilateral alternatives that are rarely acknowledged by proponents. He addresses the relationship between globalization, terrorism, and unilateralism, and provides a systematic explanation for, and defence of, Washington's response to threats of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The reality of an increasingly fragile national security environment will impose tremendous pressure on Republican and Democratic leaders alike. These long-term pressures will compel American officials to prioritize safety, protection, and invulnerability above all else in an effort to become largely self-reliant in matters of security. Harvey develops his arguments with evidence from two crucial case studies: the American ballistic missile defence program and the 2003 war in Iraq. Harvey argues that with the costs and risks of relying exclusively on multilateralism increasing, the logical, legal, strategic, and moral reasons for embracing only multilateral approaches to security are becoming more tenuous. The implications for Canada and Europe are obvious. As the U.S. becomes more threatened, the pressures that drive American unilateralism will clash with the foreign, economic, and security policies of other powers, including traditional allies, themselves motivated by a competing set of unilateral self-interests. Smoke and Mirrors will compel critics of the Bush administration to move beyond the assumption that American foreign policies are temporary in nature. Indeed, the tensions caused by terrorism and proliferation will continue to shape Washington's threat perceptions and responses for decades. Further, the book will challenge critics to demonstrate the successes (as distinct from the promises) of multilateral security and to prove that their preferred alternative has achieved the victories that would justify such a sweeping rejection of unilateralism.
Unpaid Annotation
The threat of terrorism is a fact of life for American citizens and an important issue for U.S. governments and has implications for both Canada and Europe. In Smoke and Mirrors, Frank P. Harvey mounts a case for American unilateralism by exposing the failure of multilateral alternatives. Using evidence from case studies of the ballistic missile defence program and the war in Iraq, Harvey challenges critics to demonstrate the successes of multilateral security and prove it has achieved the victories justifying a rejection of unilateralism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introduction: Transformation and Complexity: Predicting Global Security after 9/11p. 3
Objectives and Overviewp. 7
Outlinep. 8
Linking Globalism, Terrorism, and Proliferationp. 11
Globalism, Security, and Terrorism: Complexity and Confusionp. 13
Globalism and Securityp. 13
Globalism and Terrorismp. 15
Terrorism and Globalismp. 18
Globalism and Proliferation: Strategic Stability in Transitionp. 19
Strategic Stability: Continuity and Changep. 21
Globalism and the Diminishing Relevance of Vertical Proliferationp. 27
Summary and Policy Implicationsp. 29
Linking Globalism, Unilateralism, and Multilateralismp. 33
Conventional Wisdomp. 33
Unilateralist Responsep. 36
Multilateralist Reply and Unilateralist Rejoinderp. 42
Summary and Policy Implicationsp. 46
Unilateral-Multilateral Continuum(s): Measurement Errors and Correctivesp. 49
Crucial Case Studies: Gulf War II and Ballistic Missile Defencep. 62
Gulf War II: Unilateralism and Multilateralism in Practicep. 64
French and Russian Unilateralism (a.k.a. Dishonest Multilateralism)p. 65
Horse Trading: The Unilateral Self-Interests of Smaller Powersp. 68
American Multilateralism in Iraqp. 71
Unilateralism as a Prerequisite for Multilateralismp. 74
Multilateralism as an Impediment to Successful Coercive Diplomacyp. 77
European and American Differences: Illusions and Realitiesp. 79
WMD Proliferation: The Case for Unilateral Ballistic Missile Defencep. 82
Demise of Arms Control and Disarmamentp. 83
Automatic Proliferation by Russiap. 87
Automatic Proliferation by Chinap. 91
The Myth of an American First-Strike Advantagep. 96
Technological Limitations of BMD Interceptorsp. 98
Financial and Political Costsp. 113
Powerful Influence of the U.S. Military Industrial Complex (MIC)p. 120
Exaggerated Rogue Threats from Rational Rogue Leadersp. 123
Conclusion: Critical Biasesp. 130
WMD Proliferation: The Case against Multilateral Arms Control and Disarmamentp. 135
Burden(s) of Proofp. 135
Measuring NACD's Successes and Failuresp. 138
The Myth of Multilateral Alternatives to BMDp. 142
European Unilateral Self-Interests and Prioritiesp. 157
Conclusion: A Fait Accomplip. 161
The Inevitability of Terrorism, and American Unilateralism: Security Trumps Economicsp. 164
The Inevitability of High-Impact Terrorism: Globalism and the Privatization of Warp. 166
The Inevitability of Unilateralism: Domestic Determinants and Pressuresp. 171
The Inevitability of Unilateralism: External Determinants and Pressuresp. 176
Prioritizing Unilateral Arms Control and 'Discriminate Deterrence'p. 179
Prioritizing Pre-emptionp. 181
The Moral Foundations of Canadian Multilateralism: Distinction Trumps Securityp. 185
Canada's Dishonest Multilateralismp. 185
Dishonest Commitments to Multilateral Security and Defencep. 186
Dishonest Commitments to Multilateral Aid and Developmentp. 188
Dishonest Evaluations of BMD and Multilateral Arms Controlp. 191
Canada's Unprincipled (Hyper-) Multilateralism in Iraq, 2003p. 193
Selective Opposition to Regime Changep. 193
Periodic (and Selective) Support for Multilateral Consensusp. 196
Canada's Subordination and Subservience to Hyper-Multilateralismp. 201
Sporadic Reliance on Public Opinionp. 204
The Myth of Domestic Political Constraintsp. 205
Dishonest Denials of Canada's Contribution to Multilateral Intervention in Iraqp. 206
Canada's Uncompromising Compromise and the Illusion of Middle-Power Mediationp. 208
Conclusionp. 214
Recalibrating Canada's Moral and Diplomatic Compassp. 216
The Mounting Costs of Privileging 'Distinction' over 'Security'p. 216
Terrorism, Unipolarity, and Canadian Values and Interestsp. 220
Proliferation, Missile Defence, and Canadian Values and Interestsp. 223
Canada-U.S. Relations: Revisiting First Principles after 9/11p. 227
American Multilateralism in Iraq, 2003p. 233
U.S. Legislation Related to 11 September 2001p. 250
Notesp. 257
Bibliographyp. 307
Indexp. 331
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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